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July 01, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT-I IS

Butzel Health
and Fitness Spas

NCLC Shalom Fellowship Project Elicits
Christian Support of Israel, Jewish Causes

By BEN GALLOB

NEW YORK (JTA) — A
full-page advertisement
appeared in the Aug. 24,
1982 Keene, N.H. daily
"Sentinel," with an eye-
catching large-type head-
line: "The Untold Story of
the War in Lebanon: An
Eyewitness Account."

The ad, which contained a
strong endorsement of Is-
rael's invasion of Lebanon,
was sponsored by 12 Chris-
tian clergymen; four from
Keene, six from nearby
towns and two from Ver-
mont churches. One of the
Keene signers — an or-
ganizer of the advertise-
ment — was Rev. Frank
Eiklor, president of the
Shalom Fellowship.

The Shalom Fellowship is
one of about 100 Christian-
organized projects affiliated
with the National Christian
Leadership Conference for
Israel. They carry on pro-
grams of varying degrees of
intensity and scope, sup-
porting what they see as Is-
rael's biblical rights to sov-
ereignty, opposing Israel's

and Jewry's secular and
religious foes and staging
gatherings to persuade
other Christians to agree to
their views and to contrib-
ute funds to help Israel.

Rev. Eiklor, in re-
sponse to a letter from the
Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, spelled out in de-
tail the development of
his decision to dedicate a
large part of his life to
fighting for Israel and
against anti-Semitism.
The JTA wrote to Rev.
Eiklor after getting a let-
ter last February from
Gerald Ferman, execu-
tive director of the
Jewish Federation of the
North Shore, which has
offices at Marblehead,
Mass.

Ferman described Rev.
Eiklor as the sponsor of "a
unique radio ministry dedi-
cated to building bridges of
love with the Jewish people
and fighting anti-
Semitism." Ferman
enclosed clippings from
local newspapers about the
Shalom Fellowship.

The minister sent JTA a
Shalom Fellowship
brochure, carrying a mes-
sage about the Fellowship's
goals of "building bridges of
love to the Jew first and also
to the whole world." Accord-
ing to the brochure, Eiklor
was "a Gentile raised in an
anti-Semitic home," who
later spent 20 years direct-
ing a world-wide mission-
ary effort. cizq,
After his 1982 visit to
Lebanon, Eiklor made a
public statement that "as a
Christian, I am going to
rally Christians across
America and hopefully
across the world to stand by
Israel and I am going to
challenge them to do that
unconditionally."
He reported that his
taped talks were being
heard on stations in 10
cities, including Keene;
Nashua, N.J.; Boston;
New York; Lancaster,
Pa.; Indianapolis; Los
Angeles, Portland, Seat-
tle and Atlanta. He said
the 15-minute broadcasts
are aired daily,
Monday-Friday.

the JDC-Brookdale Insti-
tute of Gerontology in the
U.S. and the Hebrew Uni-
versity's Institute of Con-
temporary Jewry.
Dr. Jack Habib, head of
the Brookdale Institute,
said obtaining funds
from the government for
the elderly is not the
problem. It is rather,
where to allocate the
funds that seems to be
causing difficulties, he
said.
"The direction that the
government is going in now
is not clear." He added that
"There hasn't been a resolu-
tion of the relative em-
phasis to be placed on in-
stitutional solutions vs.
community solutions, nor
has there been any resolu-
tion with regard to the
organization of care. We do

Experienced Leadership

Decades of Israeli diplomatic and university ex-
perience were represented at the dedication of Elath
Hall at Hebrew University's Givat Ram campus.
Shown are, from left, Yaacov Tsur, Israel's former
man, former
ambassador to France; Avraham Har
ambassador to the U.S.; Eliahu Elath, former ambas-
sador to Britain and the U.S.; and former Hebrew
University Rector Prof. Nathan Rotenstreich. Har-
man and Elath are also former Hebrew University
presidents, and Harman has just been named chan-
cellor of the school.

• Personal Fitness Profile • Body Awareness
• Dynamic Stretching • Yoga • Kalosomatics
• Aerobic Dance • Swimnastics • Back Care
• Seminars • Tennis • Jogging • Walking
• Volleyball • Softball
• Horseback Riding (Full-Week Spa)
• Swimming • Sailing • Canoeing
• Skit Night • Square Dance • Israeli Dance
• Calorie Controlled Meals • Stress Reduction
• A Great Group Experience •
Directed By Ada Bandalene

ISRAEL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY,

ISRAEL Film Night

Israel: Twentieth Century Miracle

The transformation of Israel from an unproductive desert country into a world ranking exporter of
agricultural produce . . . Research programs resulted in reclamation of large tracts of land and
production of a great variety of farm products — some not seen in the area since biblical times . . .
Latest farming techniques (1982) . . . Closeup of kibbutz and moshav life . . .

Israel's Mediterranean Shores

A travelogue along the Israeli coast, shows many of Israel's popular resort towns, beaches and
spectaculat views.

kirk Douglas Reports from Technion

Israerspends the highest percentage of its gross national product on research and development of
any country in the world. The State of Israel would not have reached its current high level of
technological achievement without the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. Israel has no other
advantage over other nations in national resources, but they do have the human advantage —
acdemics and engineers. Israel's technological future is dependent on the Technion; upon
graduates already in industry and all those who will follow.

UNITED HEBREW SCHOOLS

21550 West 12 Mile Road, Southfield

Wednesday, July 13, 1983 at 7:45 p.m.

Advanced multi-function
technology steeped in style.
Water-tested to 300 feet. Black
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LAWRENCE M. ALLAN, President
gemologist & diamontologist
30400 TELEGRAPH • BIRMINGHAM
LOCATED AT 121/2 MILE
SUITES 104/134

Awarded Certificate by GIA in
Grading & Evaluation

Daily til 5:30,
Sat. til 4:30

AUTHORIZED DEALER

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WEEKEND SPA:

Friday, September 2-Sunday, September 4

AMERICAN SOCIETY for HUM

THE

For the
man of action.
Bold. Graphic.
Seiko "Sports 100."

SEIKO

CALL 661-0600

FOR BROCHURE AND APPLICATION

Detroit Chapter

not know what direction
that is going in and it is still
very controversial," Habib
said.
Akiva Lewinsky, the
Jewish Agency treasurer,
said there are hundreds of
immigrant families who
cannot leave absorption
centers because even with
maximum mortgate assis-
tance they cannot buy
apartments." He said
"among those affected are
elderly people."

642-5575

FOR WOMEN

Asked by the JTA
whether the Shalom Fel-
lowship collected funds for
Israel and Jewish causes, he
replied that "right now, we
do not collect funds • for Is-
rael because we're trying to
collect funds to keep us on
radio so we can engender
support for Israel." He
added that the Fellowship
"gives a monthly amount to
our North Shore Jewish
Federation which helps in
Israel."

Difficulties Predicted for Aging
World Jewish Population

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
The aging of the Jewish
population in Israel and
throughout the world will
pose new problems of care
for the elderly in the not too
distant future, a Hebrew
University professor and an
American gerontologist
said at a press conference
here last week.
According to U. 0.
Schmelz, professor of con-
temporary Jewry, -"the
proportion of Diaspora Jews
over the age 65 will increase
by five percent, to 20 per-
cent of the total population
by the year 2000. In Israel,
the number of Jews aged 65
or over will increase from
258,000 in 1975 to 456,000
by the end of the century,"
he said.
Schmelz's statistics came
from a recent joint study by

Friday, July 1, 1983

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