100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 01, 1983 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-07-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IS

1 $ 4
THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, July 1, 1983

Hungary Importing `Loafers' for Budapest Yeshiva

By MOSHE RON

The Jewish News Special
Israel Correspondent

TEL AVIV — According
to the Talmud, "loafers" are

BILL
MEYER
MUSIC
355-2721

PEOPLE'S
CHOICE
459-7287

INNO-
VATIONS
589-2478

men who do not work but
dedicate themselves to
study the whole day in the
synagogue for the spiritual
needs of the community.
In 1956, the last yeshiva
in Hungary was in the town
of Paksz. Then the revolu-
tion against the Communist
regime broke out. The
yeshiva scholars dispersed
all over the country and
many of them came to Is-
rael. Now there are pros-
pects that a new yeshiva
will open in Budapest, with
10 scholars to be "im-
ported." This was the condi-
tion set by Rabbi Ahron
Gedaljahu Hofman, an Is-
raeli citizen and inhabitant
of the Orthodox town Bnei
Brak, when he was offered
the post of Chief Rabbi of
Budapest, which has been
vacant since the death of
former Chief Rabbi Moshe

MARC
ANKERMAN

Disc Jockey
"The Best Music in Town"
Parties, Dances &
Special Occasions
546-5797-544-0454

LIGHTS - SOUND
EXPERIENCE

Kahane Weiss.
It is the first time that a
Jewish community of a
Communist country has
agreed to "import" a rabbi
from Israel. The Hungarian
Communist authorities
even accepted the condi-
tions of the rabbi to open a
yeshiva in Budapest. Rabbi
Hofman lives with his wife
Shoshana and their three
youngest daughters in Bnei
Brak.
They have nine children.
The mediator between
Rabbi Hofman and the
Hungarians was an
American Jew, Laszlo
Keller. He was born in
Hungary, has close com-
mercial ties with the
Hungarian authorities
and spends a few months
every year in Budapest.
When Rabbi Weiss died,
Keller was asked to find a
rabbi who would be ready to
move to Budapest and take
the office of Chief Rabbi.
Keller did not find a suita-
ble candidate in the United
States who was ready to live
in a Communist country.
The Hungarian authorities
offered a monthly salary of
$2,000.

vania, which once belonged
to Hungary, and speaks
Hungarian very well. He
consulted many rabbis,
among them the rabbi from
Satmar, Moshe Telbaum,
who advised him to accept
the office.
Rabbi Hofman went to
Budapest a few weeks ago.
He met the leaders of the
Jewish community, gave a
few lectures in the syna-
gogue and was well re-
ceived. He will be assisted
by a gabai and will receive a
big apartment. Everybody
lauded his Hungarian and
an agreement was signed
with him.
The chairman of the
Jewish community, Zvi
Fiksler, sent a special let-
ter to the chairman of the
Rabbinical Council in Tel
Aviv, Pinhas Sheinman,
and asked him officially
to release Rabbi Hofman
from his post in the Rab-
binical Council for the
period of one year, in
order to prevent Jewish
life in Budapest from
perishing.
The 45-year-old Rabbi

At last Rabbi Hofman
from Bnei Brak was chosen;
he is a Talmud sage, knows
several languages and has
good relations with people.
He has already fulfilled
some missions abroad. The
rabbi was born in Transyl-

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger on Mon-
day urged the U.S. and Is-
rael to use their present
warming relations to strive
for a deeper strategic
understanding. He said it
was dangerous for two coun-
tries that needed each other
to have eroller-coaster" re-
lationship of ups and downs.
Kissinger spoke at a
dinner given in his honor by
President Chaim Herzog,
who said the American dip-

JOIN OUR NEWJR. MEMBERSHIP*
AT HAMILTON PLACE AND...

S ti ll

HURRY! OFFER
ENDS SOON

• Applicant must be under 30 years of age. proof
required. Limited amount of memberships avail-
able.
• Depending on demand some restrictions may
apply.

Try out the club on us...
Call for a

FREE GUEST
PASS**

Hall

OVER

0

Prices will
never be lower.
Now there is a more
affordable way to join
Hamilton Place. Like our
new Junior Membership*
club for people under 30
years of age. Spend the
summer relaxing in
`Southfield's most luxurious
Health and Social Club.
The "SUPER SAVINGS
PLAN" means savings for
everyone ... why not call
now and see which plan is
right for you.

• Tennis • Pools • Nautilus
• Aerobics • Saunas
• Lockers • Jogging Tracks
• Sandy Beach
• Much more.

HAMILTON . PLACE
CALL NOW 646-8990

Presented by

Hall Real Estate Group

30333 Southfield Rd. (between 12 & 13 Mile Roads)

Salaries Jump

Hofman speaks six lan-
guages. He had studied in
several Hungarian
yeshivot. His wife intends to
teach Hebrew to Jewish
girls in Budapest.

According to a condition
requested by Rabbi Hof-
man, la Jewish youngsters
will be brought from the
U.S. to Budapest to study in
a yeshiva. The youngsters
will pay $500 per month and
in this way foreign currency
will come to Hungary. It is
hoped that the small
yeshiva will in the course of
time attract Jewish
youngsters from all over
Hungary. It will compete
with the Reform Rabbinical
Seminary in Hungary.

The small Orthodox
community in Budapest
produces some products for
religious Jews like wine,
alcoholic drinks and spices,
which are exported and
bring dollars into Hungary.
Today there are 60,000
Jews living in Hungary,
survivors of the million
Jews who lived in Hungary
before the Holocaust.

Kissinger Urges Understanding

Marriage Rate
Worries Rabbis

TEL AVIV (ZINS) —
"Permissiveness among Is-
raeli youth in general and
Tel Aviv youth in particular
are among the reasons for
the decline in the number of
couples getting married,"
Tel Aviv Chief Rabbi
Yedidia Frenkel said re-
cently at a meeting called
by the Religious Council to
discuss the "deteriorating
status of marriage."
Religious Council head
Pinhas Sheinman noted
that the number of couples
registering for marriage is
down 23 percent compared
with five years ago.
Marriage Bureau man-
ager Rabbi Yehuda Landau
said that the alarming de-
crease in marriage was ap-
parent throughout the
country and was caused,
among other things, by the
shortage of jobs. Emigra-
tion, the housing shortage
and the present difficult
economic situation were
other factors cited.

Wins Award

NEW YORK — The
American Jewish Commit-
tee has named Raya Zack as
the first winner of its Dis-
tinguished Service Award.
The award will be given an-
nually to an AJCommittee
employe.

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
Salaries of Knesset mem-
bers and leading govern-
ment officials were raised
67 percent April 1, in line
with national wage in-
creases.
Prime
Minister
Menahem Begin has a gross
salary of 121,000 shekels
($3,000) per month. The
Speaker of the Knesset is
paid the same as Begin and
other Knesset members are
paid IS 102,000 ($2,500).
The highest paid public
figure is the president of the
Israel Supreme Court — IS
168,000 ($4,000) per month.

TAU President

TEL AVIV — Moshe
Many, professor of surgery
at Tel Aviv University's
Sackler Faculty of Medicine
and chief of the Urology De-
partment of the Sheba Med-
ical Center, Tel Hashomer,
has been elected president
of Tel Aviv University. He
joined the staff of Tel Aviv
University in 1964 as assis-
tant dean of the faculty,
upon the establishment of
the Sackler Faculty of
Medicine.
Jack L. Cummings of
Canada was re-elected
chairman of the Board of
Governors of the university.

Agriculture Dean

JERUSALEM — Prof.
Raphael Goren has been
elected dean of the Hebrew
University's Faculty of Ag-
riculture in Rehovot for a
three-year period.

Caricatures

for your party

By

HENRY KISSINGER

lomat "achieved a place in
the history of Israel and the
Middle East by paving the
way towards the historic
developments which have
led to peace between Israel
and Egypt."

SAM FIELD

399-1320

Bloom Qi, de Bloom

Registered Electrologists

Come and let us remove your unwanted hair problem
and improve your appearance.

Ask For Shirfee or Debby.

559-1969

Appt. Only
NEW NUMBER
Near 12 Mile Rd. bet. Evergreen & Southfield

553-7111

BODY SERVI4 'E

BUMPING & PAINTING

All work guaranteed

Free Estimates

Reliable and Experienced since 1930
on all makes of cars

28829 Orchard Lake Rd., between 12 & 13 Mile
Farmington Hills, MI. 48018
Max Fleischer

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan