100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 24, 1983 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, June 24, 1983

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

FIRESTONE

JEWELRY

Wholesale Diamonds & Jewelry
Remounting Jewelry & Watch Repair
SUITE 318 ADVANCE BLDG
23077 Greenfield at 9 Mile
(313) 557-1860

Andropov's Anti-Zionist Unit Signals Harsh Tactics

(Continued from Page 1)

sador Arthur Hartman pro-
testing contacts between a
U.S. diplomat, James
Glenn, and Soviet Jewish
activists.
Jewish neither in all its
personnel nor its program,
the anti-Zionist committee
will not try to improve the
status of Jews or Jewish cul-
ture in the USSR. Opposed
to Zionism, the committee,
so far, has shown no inten-
tion of recognizing other
forms of Jewish expression.
The rhetoric used by the
anti-Zionist committee
moreover has raised the
spectre of dual loyalty by
asking Soviet Jews, im-
plicitly, to choose between
Jewish sentiments and
Soviet patriotism. The
committee's appeal, at the
same time, encourages
non-Jews to watch Jews lest
they show any attachment
to Israel.

government continues to
pay inordinate attention to
the issue of Soviet Jewry.
Pravda, the Communist
Party's official organ, ran
the appeal on Page 4, and
the petition appeared
simultaneously in regional
newspapers, including
Leningradskaia Pravda and
Pravda Ukrainy. Carried
write the best prescription for
both by the central press,
closely monitored by West-
your sprinkler needs
ern observers, and in the
regional press, the appeal
was aimed at domestic and
foreign audiences, that is, at
Jeffrey Schreiber
publics in Leningrad and
968-0487
No Sabbath Calls
Kiev as well as New York,
and Washington.
By denigrating Israel and
extolling the .Soviet Union,
the appeal attempts to
the business overload specialist
eliminate Soviet Jewish
545 - 0131 monday-friday
interest in emigration. Hop-
rona s. kleinman
24631 kenosha, oak park, michigan 48237
ing to attract the interest of
2 bookkeeping
2 efficient
Jewish readers, the appeal
[a mailings
refrains from attacking
2 accurate
* * *
2 billings
2 able to meet your deadline
Jewish culture. It thus dis-
payrool
tinguishes itself from some
2 pick-up & dlivery
April 1 Appeal
2 all clerical
of the more crude Soviet
[a experienced
Outlines Policy
2 office organization
"anti-Zionist" articles and
2 specializing in helping
The wide media coverage
books with anti-Semitic
small businesses
given the April 1 appeal
overtones, published after
absolutely the lowest rates
suggests that the Soviet
1967. So disturbing are
these publications that an
embarrassed Soviet
spokesman has called them
"improper expositions."
In its opening section, the
appeal, using terms already
familiar to the Soviet pub-
lic, discusses Israeli and
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
Zionist involvement with
"the most agressive forces of
will
imperialism, bloody mas-
sacres . . . in Sabra and
"TRANSPLANT"
Shatila . . . violence and tor-
its Offices July 1, 1983 to
ture in Ansar and other con-
centration camps . . ." These
passages, modeled on others
18877 W. TEN MILE RD.
in the past, aim to convince
SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48075
Soviet Jews that Israel and
Zionism are evil.
The appeal defines
(313) 557-6644
Zionism as concentrating in
itself"extreme nationalism,
chauvinism . . . military
adventurism ... de-
magoguery . . . and
treachery." Taking advan-
tage of the current barrage
of anti-Israel reports in the
Soviet media, the appeal
suggests that any positive
views Jews might have of
Israel are mistaken, and
that emigration to Israel
would be a serious error.
The second segment of
the appeal disputes
Western claims that
anti-Semitism exists in
5111 1is
11111
!main
the Soviet Union, and
I or-4mm Kill= I am =se !MUM I= MN
c1.111111111i
IOU •■■ .smawn wail= OM
;
olur ,■.= 11111111MPrwommisomo
also tries to inspire Soviet
gm II
mg INN WISI lamp
r2. • am. so
sin
patriotism and faith in
_
ar ■ te-.
Soviet nationality policy
- III V
12
'4 10.4 4*
among Soviet Jews. It is
‘rimarier
"the ring-leaders of
Zionism" who strive to
convince world public
opinion that anti-Jewish
We Welcome Your Continued Support!
sentiment exists in the
USSR, when, in fact, this

appointed Moscow rabbi,
Yakov Fishman, sent a let-
ter to American Ambas-

Let the

RAIN DOCTOR

Help, inc.

*i v RE MOVIN G

7

4112111111111►

Fully.Adjustable Hospital Beds

COMPLETE SELECTION OF
HOME HEALTH CARE EQUIPMENT
IS AS NEAR AS YOUR TELEPHONE

Mobile
Commodes

Folding Wheel Chairs

AVAILABLE FOR SALE OR RENTAL

Full Selection S
of Canes '

24.Hr.
Emergency
Service
on Oxygen
Equipment

1!

Adjustable

Walkers

WE BILL MEDICARE, MEDICAID
OR BLUE CROSS FOR YOU

MEDICAL RENTALS 6-

and HOSPITAL SUPPLY, Inc.

21310 Coolidge, Oak Park, Mich. 48237, Phone (313) 399-6780

Free Delivery
Fully Set-Up

OPEN MON-FRI
8 a.m.-5 p.m.
SAT 8 a.m.-12 noon

is an obvious "fabrica-
tion," the appeal states.
Doubtless, the anti-
Zionism committee sees
deflating human rights
violations in the Soviet
Union as one of its goals.
of its goals.
Yet in this second part of
the appeal, heavy stress is
laid upon the duty of Soviet
citizens, including Soviet
Jews, to feel patriotism
toward the USSR. The ap-
peal refers to Western criti-
cism of the Soviet Union as
"slander/of/our Soviet
homeland" and falsification
of "the nationality policy of
the Soviet Communist
Party . . . in a particularly
coarse manner." This is a
call to Soviet pride, not an
effort to use reason or fact to
dispute Western accusa-
tions. Phrases such as "the
socialist Fatherland" and a
"new beautiful society —
communism," follow- there-
after.
The formula. "Jewish citi-
zens of the USSR" is used in
the appeal in place of the
traditional "citizens of the
USSR of Jewish national-
ity." This might be another
way of de-emphasizing the
separate ethnic status of
Jews, and of emphasizing
Soviet, over Jewish, iden-
tity. The" key statement in
this context is "Soviet citi-
zens — Jews — are an in-
separable part of the Soviet
people." In the context of
current policy this ostensi-
bly laudable statement
means that Soviet Jews will
be given no cultural rights,
and the Soviet regime may
refuse to permit Jewish
emigration.
The final section of the
April 1 appeal stresses that
all Soviet citizens of every
background and ethnic, ori-
gin must join in the struggle
against Zionism. By no
means is the task of detect-
ing and eliminating
Zionism to be left to Soviet
Jews. Rather, all Soviet
citizens must "take an
active part" in helping Jews
to shed any attachment to
Israel, and to merge into
Soviet society as a whole.

* * *
Background of
the Committee

The multinational char-
acter of the anti-Zionist
committee is underscored
by the fact that of the eight
members of the Presidium,
only six- definitely are
Jewish. Members of the
committee either have de-
fended the USSR before
Western audiences or have
held high-level positions in
Soviet journalism.
Lt. General David
Dragunsky serves as the
anti-Zionist committee's
chairman. A retired tank
commander, Dragunsky
was used by the Soviets in a
previous anti-Zionist cam-
paign in 1969-1971, dis-
cussed below. Samuil Zivs, a
law professor, who also par-
ticipated in the 1969-1971
anti-Zionist effort, serves as
the committee's first deputy
chairman.
In 1971. at a press confer-
ence held in Brussels a day
before the opening of the

.

First World Conference on
Soviet Jewry, Zivs stated
that Soviet Jews "are satis-
fied with the existence they
lead," and that only a few
wished to leave the USSR.
Author of "Human Rights:
Continuing the Discussion"
(1980), Samuil Zivs is a
well:known defender of the
Soviet Union's human
rights record in interna-
tional bodies, such as UN-
ESCO.
Only four of the six
other members of the
anti-Zionist committee's
presidium are definitely
Jewish. The Jewish
members are Mark
Krupkin, deputy director
of Novosti, a Soviet press
agency; Martin
Kabachnik, an aca-
demician; Genrikas
Zimanas, a deputy of the
Lithuanian SSR Supreme
Soviet; and Viktor
Pushkanov, a deputy of
the USSR Supreme
Soviet.
The other two presidium
members are Igor Beliayev,
a department head at the
literary-political journal
"Literaturnaia Gazeta,"
who is not Jewish, and Yuri
Kolesnikov, a member for
the Soviet Writers Union,
who may not be Jewish.
Skilled publicists, these
men can produce sophisti-
cated materials defending
the Soviet Union.
Coming from a variety of
backgrounds, members of
the anti-Zionist committee
will be able to comment on
Western statements on
human rights, the position
of Jews in the USSR or the
threat of Zionism to the
Soviet people as a whole.
Yuri Andropov, in his
first public address after as-
suming leadership of the
Communist Party, provided
the policy context for such
initiatives as the anti-
Zionist committee, which
aims to legitimize an almost
total cutoff in emigration
and sever bonds between
Soviet Jews and other
Jewish communities.
In remarks dealing
with the nationality ques-
tion, the Soviet leader
mentioned specifically
ethnic Germans, Poles,
Koreans, Kurds and
"other nationalities" who
lack nationality repub-
lics and who retain con-
nections with foreign
states. Like Soviet Jews,
under Leonid Brezhnev,
members of these groups
were permitted to emi-
grate based on ethnic ties
to foreign states. For in-
stance, Jews were issued
visas to Israel.
According to Andropov,
however, these nationali-
ties are "fully equal/with/
Soviet citizens . . . they are
peoples for whom the Soviet
Union has long ago become
their native land." In other
words, all ethnic groups will
be treated as part of the cor-
porate whole. This may
translate itself into barring
emigration for Jews, ethnic
Germans, Armenians and
members of other national-
ity groups.
(Continued on Page 10)

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan