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March 25, 1983 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-
THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

32 Friday, March 25, 1983

New Cookbook Has Timeliness for Passover

STRICTLY KOSHER MEAT MARKET

13831 W. 9 Mile Rd., Oak Park 543-7092

WILL BE CLOSED MARCH 28
WE WILL REOPEN APRIL 7.

WE WISH ALL OUR
FRIENDS & CUSTOMERS
A HAPPY, KOSHER PESACH.

What "Natural" factors
attributable to good Jewish
cooking are applicable to
kashrut?
Jane Kinderlehrer pro-
vides the answers in her
cookbook, "Cooking Kosher:
the Natural Way"
(Jonathan David Pub-
lishers).
Appearing in time for
Passover, this 350-page
cookbook contains hun-
dreds of recipes, all tested
by her and having the qual-
ity of notable recom-
mendations.
The fact that 17 pages
are devoted to Passover
recipes lend the quality

CHUCK
& BUD'S FRUIT MKT. & DELI
13745 West 9 Mile (corner of Westhampton)

Hours weekdays 8-7, Sun. 7:30-5

543-8780

HAPPY PASSOVER

Mendelson

JUMBO EGGS •

JUMBO VVALNUTS -

u.s..,

IDAHO POTATOES

19Cdozen

,

,.

1
$19
, 10 lb. bag

Cooking

ONIONS

29c3

lb. bag

California

CARROTS

23 C 1 lb. pkg.

WE WILL CARRY PASSOVER MILK &
OTHER PASSOVER DAIRY PRODUCTS
OPEN SUN., MARCH 27, 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.
CLOSED TUESDAY MARCH 29 FOR PASSOVER

,

Specials Good Through March 28

Pure, 100% natural yogurt
Kosher Certified by the
Metropolitan Kashruth Council
Product of the C.F. Burger Creamery

of holiday timeliness to
this volume.
For the strict observers of
kashrut, the values pro-
vided in the Kinderlehrer
volume his special signifi-
cance in this introductory
essay by Dr. Robert S. Men-
delsohn:
"Just because certain
foods are kosher does not
necessarily mean they are
healthy to eat. The laws of
kashrut — like those of
Shabat, circumcision and
others — cannot always be
justified on the grounds that
they produce health. Obser-
vance of Jewish law, tradi-
tion and ethics may indeed
lead to good health, but this
is not the explicit, primary
aim.
"Indeed, everyone knows
that kosher junk food
is ubiquitous in modern
Jewish society. Chemical
compounds serve to blur the
traditional milk-meat dis-
tinctions to such an extent
that recently a non-Jewish
guest at a major kosher
Catskill resort ate for three
days before she discovered,
by accident, that the rich
food on the overloaded ta-
bles was kosher.
"Our
modern
authorities, physicians,
have totally failed to lead
us in the direction of good
nutrition. Our traditional
authorities, rabbis, have
likewise failed to protect
us' from the 'better living
through chemistry' men-
tality of the American
food industry.
"Occasional voices are
heard in the wilderness,
such as those of Toronto
Rabbi Gedaliah Felder who,
in a recent article (Torah
U'Madah, 1975) dealing
with chemical substances in
food, stated that while these
may not be trafe or un-
kosher per se, they may
yet be dangerous to life
and, for this reason, should
be prohibited even though
present in only tiny
amounts. Rabbi Felder con-
cluded that if the rabbis fail
to disqualify these danger-
ous contaminated food sub-
stances, they are guilty of
misleading the people.
"Yet, the Jewish people
indeed are being misled.
Otherwise, how could Rab-
binic sanction be given to
infant formulas

granddaddy of all the junk
food? How could genera-
tions of Jewish babies be
deprived of human milk?
How could antibiotic-
contaminated meat and
estrogen-saturated fowl,
and poisonous additives and
preservatives be allowed to
endanger the health and
lives of Torah-observant
Jews?
"The failure of modern
Jewish law to cope with the
abuses of modern American
nutrition has produced atti-
tudes of cynicism and con-
tempt among many young
Jews who see as their only
alternative turning to other
life styles that offer healthy
discipline in food prepara-
tion, selection and inges-
tion.
"Thus,\ Jane Kinder-
lehrer's book appears at
a crucial time. While the
Bible appropriately sits
in the living room, 'Cook-
ing Kosher: The Natural
Way' belongs in every
Jewish kitchen. As a mat-
ter of fact, I would
recommend 'Cooking
Kosher: The Natural
Way' as a gift for every
Bar Mitzva boy, every
Bat Mitzva girl, and for
every Jewish bride and
groom. This book may
well be an essential in-
gredient in our eternal
quest. for Jewish — and
biological — survival."
Testifying to the values
provided for the current
holiday .period are the fol-
lowing Passover selections
extracted from "Cooking
Kosher: The Natural Way":

LARGE MATZA BREI
8 whole wheat matzot
3 to 4 cups boiling water
4 eggs, lightly beaten
Salt and pepper to taste
Butter or oil for frying (about 4
tbsps.)

Break the matzot into 2-inch
squares. Place in a large bowl
or pot. Pour boiling water over
the matza pieces and drain
immediately through a colan-
der. (The pieces should be
only slightly moistened, so
they will absorb the egg.) Re-
turn the matza to the bowl or
large pot. Add the beaten eggs
and seasoning. Toss with a
fork until all pieces are coated.
Heat the butter in a heavy 10-
to 12-inch skillet until bubbly
but not browned. Pour the
matza mixture into the butter
and fry over medium heat.
When the underside begins to
brown, turn the entire matza
brei with a spatula. If it breaks,
turn in sections. Turn until all
sides are golden.
* * *

Pit

M

' 1 , k;

ti I

* * *

Mrs. Kinderlehrer- is
LOW-FAT
enior editor of Prevention
LOW-CALORIE
magazine and author of
PASSOVER KISHKE
2 stalks celery, with leaves " Confessions of a Sneaky
1 large carrot, cut Into pieces 0 rganic Cook," "How to
1 large onion, quartered
eel Young Longer," and
1 egg
The
Art of Cooking -With
1 /4 cup peanut oil
ove-
and Wheat Germ."
1 /2 teaspoon salt (optional)
A former president of the
1 /4 cup poppy seeds
ehigh Valley Writers'
1 1 /4 cups whole wheat cake
uild, Mrs. Kinderlehrer
meal
1 tsp. paprika
orked for six years at the
ew York Times, where she
Whip the vegetables, egg,
oil, salt, and poppy seeds in a r an the shoppers' columns.
blender. Combine this mixture
In addition to her popular
with the cake meal and pap-
monthly column for Preven-
rika. Spoon half of this mixture t
ion magazine, which is
onto a sheet of parchment
d
edicated to nutrition and
paper. Shape into a roll similar
ood health, Mrs. Kinder-
to a traditional kishke. Roll it
ehrer has written numer-
securely, then twist the ends
us articles for national
of the paper. Repeat with the
other half of the mixture.
agazines.

,

4E7 WT. 8 OZ. (2211'

Put the rolls on a cookie
sheet or in a baking dish and
bake in a preheated 350 degree
oven for 1 hour. This kishke
can be frozen before or after
baking. Serves 8 to 10.
* * *
KNAIDLACH
4 eggs, separated
1 /2 cup white matza meal and 1h
cup whole wheat matza meal
1 tsp. salt (optional)
Dash of ground ginger
Dash of cinnamon
Boiling soup or salted water
Beat the gg whites un til
stiff. Continue beating while
you gradually add the yolks,
the matza meal, and the sea-
sonings. Refrigerate for at
least 15 minutes. Wet your
hands, then form the mixture
into balls, handling very
lightly. Drop into boiling soup
or salted water. Cover and
cook until the matza balls rise
to the top — about 20 minutes.
Makes 12 to 16 knaldiach.
* * *
SCRAMBLED
MATZA BREI
3 whole wheat matzot
water
2 tbsps. butter or oil
2 eggs
2 tbsps. water or milk
1 /4 tsp. salt
Break the matzot into bite-
sized pieces. Place in a bowl
and cover with water for a few
seconds; pour the water off
quickly. Press excess water
out of the matza pieces. Melt
the butter in a skillet, add the
matza pieces, andfry lightly. In
a bowl, beat the eggs; add the
water or milk and salt. Pour
this over the pieces of matza
and fry, stirring constantly
until the eggs are set. Serves 2
or 3.
* * *
ORANGE CAKE
9 eggs, separated
3 /4 cup honey
Y4 cup flour made from whole
wheat matza (takes about 4
matzot)
3 /4 cup potato starch
2 tsps. cinnamon
1/2 can (6 ounces) orange juice
concentrate, undiluted
1 tbsp. grated orange peel
1 cup shredded carrot
Y2 cup finely chopped walnuts
1/2 cup raisins
In a large bowl, beat the egg
whites until stiff; set aside. In
another bowl, beat the egg
yolks until thick; gradually
beat in the honey. Combine the
dry ingredients and add to the
egg yolk-honey mixture alter-
nately with the orange juice
concentrate. Stir in the orange
peel, carrot, nuts, and raisins.
Fold the egg yolk mixture
gently into the beaten whites.
Turn into an ungreased 10-
inch tube pan.
Bake in a preheated 325-
degree oven for 55 to 60 min-
utes, until the cake is golden
brown. Invert the pan on a wire
rack; let the cake cool com-
pletely. Serves 12 to 16.

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