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March 11, 1983 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

20 Friday, March 11, 1983

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Gap Between Ashkenazim,
Sephardim Closes in Israel

For Appointments Call

BILL McDONALD

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
An Israeli sociologist and
educator declared that Is-
rael was "heading" toward
closing the social gap be-
tween Jews of European
origin and those who came
from Arab and Asian coun-
tries.
"But we are not there
yet," Dr. Chaim Adler told

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Boris Smolar's

some 1,000 persons attend-
ing the 35th convention of
the National Council of
Jewish Women (NCJW).
The four-day convention
also marked the beginning
of the 90th anniversary of
the NCJW, the oldest
Jewish women's volunteer
organization in the U.S.
Barbara Mandel, of
Cleveland, was installed
to a two-year term as
NCJW president, suc-
ceeding Shirley Leviton
who ended her four-
years as president.
Adler, who is director of
the NCJW's Institute for
Innovation and Education
at the School of Education of
the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem, said indications
of the closing of the social
gap are that the differences
in family size between
Ashkenazic and Sephardic
Jews have disappeared and
that the disparities in edu-
cation are "shrinking."
He said he hoped that Is-
raeli Ashkenazim • and
Sephardim will soon
achieve the same situation
as Jews from Eastern
Europe and Germany have
in the U.S. where the gap
that once existed between
them is no longer there.
But Adler said, there is a
new "urgency" because the
ethnic split in Israel has
been introduced into the
country's political disput-
ers.
The institution headed
by Adler was established
by the NCJW to develop,
implement and evaluate
programs for the disad-
vantaged in Israel.
At a dinner last Friday
night, Jeane Kirkpatrick,
the U.S. Ambassador to the
UN, said that the UN reso-
lution equating Zionism
with racism has been used
to deny Israel the "legiti-
mate rights of self-defense."
She said the "obnoxious
phrase Zionism is racism"
symbolized' the agreement
of African countries to sup-
port the Arabs against Is-
rael in return for Arab sup-
port against South Africa.
Kirkpatrick said the UN
political system protects
some countries against cen-
sure while subjecting
others. "Israel is the princi-
pal example," to continuing
censure.
She charged that there
is a "terrible double
standard" on human
rights in the UN in which
nations of the Soviet bloc,
Africa, except South Af-
rica, and Asia are pro-
tected from criticism
while Latin American
countries and "especially
Israel" have no such pro-
tection.
On the domestic scene,
Leviton noted that when
President Reagan calls
1983 the. year of the Bible,
"can we believe that Ameri-
can democracy rests on the
principle of separation of
church and state?"
She also scored the Re-
agan Administration's pro-
grams on such traditional
NCJW concerns as women,
children and youth and the
elderly.

.

`Between You
. . . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA

(Copyright 1983, JTA, Inc.)

ARAB OIL-YESTERDAY, TODAY: The rift now -
developing in the ranks of the rulers of Arab oil-countries
— a rift caused by the diminishing importance of Arab oil
for the United States and other industrial lands — is being
closely watched by leading Jewish organizations in this
country.
Vivid in the minds of American Jewry is the attempt of
the Arab oil countries, led by Saudi Arabia, to put over on
the American people the nefarious "explanation" that the
15-fold hike in the price of their oil is a retaliation for the
support the U.S. government is giving to Israel.
Large masses of unemployed Americans who lost their
jobs because of the slackening of American industry would
have also fallen into this Arab trap. So could many Ameri-
cans affected by the inflation.
The danger to American Jewry became even greater
when the ugly "explanation" of the Arab rulers found sup-
port among some of the American oil companies dealing.
with Arab oil. Jewish leaders were jittery. They acted
speedily and vigorously and succeeded in nipping the Arab
effort in the bud. Of great help in this direction was the
common sense displayed by many thinking Americans who
recognized the true motives of the Arab rulers — the greed
to become billionaires in a short period of time, the ambi-
tion to gain political power in the world by using their oil as
a powerful weapons, and the intention to utilize this
weapon as a tool against countries aiding Israel.
Addressing a gathering of the U.S. Foreign Policy
Association during a visit to this country, the Saudi oil
minister, Sheik Yamani, impertinently declared that
Saudi Arabia was doing the United States a "favor" by
pumping more oil from its wells to provide the much-
needed oil for America's industry and military require-
ments. He tied the continuation of this "favor" to a request
that the U.S. should, in return, use pressure on Israel and
also provide its most advanced weaponry to Saudi Arabia.
CHANGING CONDITIONS: This was more than 10
years ago. Today the situation is by far not the same. Today
the countries depending on importation of oil — especially
the United States — do not have to rely primarily on Arab
oil. There is strong competition today in the world oil mar-
ket. Mexico, Nigeria, Britain, Norway and other oil-
producing countries are all selling oil at prices much
lower than the Arab countries of the OPEC "cartel," not to
speak of the fact that progress has been made during the
last years in developing alternatives for oil — natural gas,
coal, hydro-and-nuclear power and solar power.
The changes that had taken place in the world oil and
energy markets during the last five years have been
greater and more rapid than originally foreseen. They
greatly increased energy efficiency and strengthened the
trends toward substituting Arab oil with other "non-
conventional" sources of energy for oil. They also stimu-
lated a vast increase in exploration for oil and gas outside
Arab countries. In effect, non-Arab oil began to displace
Arab oil.
The world still needs Saudi'oil and will need it for some
time, but not to the same extent as in the Arab blackmail
years. A point is now being approached at which world
economy can look forward to function without Saudi oil.
The revenues of Arab oil countries totaled about $200 bil-
lion last year; however, in the last 10 weeks the U.S. import
of OPEC oil plunged 25 percent. This created a deficit in
Saudi's balance of payments. What was unthinkable 10
years ago is not impossible in the very near future. Conser-
vation in consuming countries, coupled with the growth of
output from new fields, has reduced significantly U.S. and
world dependence on Arab oil.
THE JEWISH POLICY: American Jewish organiza-
tions are still on the alert. They continue very actively to
watch developments on the energy scene.
This is especially done by the constituent groups of the
National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council.
The American Jewish Committee maintains a special de-
partment collecting and issuing important tactical and
analytical information on Arab oil developments, based on
studies by experts. The studies all reveal the diminishing
importance of Middle East oil.
The NJCRAC has now called on its national con-
stituent agencies 'to closely monitor legislative and ad-
ministrative developments in the field of alternative
energy to replace Arab oil. In its guidelines for 1983 it urges
its • affiliated organizations to demand that government
authorities take strong measures — through mandating of
conservation practices, tax incentives and disincentives,
and other means — to raise energy efficiency standards in
housing and other buildings, in motor vehicles, industrial
machinery, appliances. It also advocates government assis-
tance in converting existing machinery and equipment to
the use of fuels other than oil.

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