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March 04, 1983 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE JEWISH NEWS

(USPS 275-520)

AT THE BAROFJUSTICe

Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle commencing with the issue of July 20, 1951

Copyright © The Jewish News PUblishing Co.

Member of American Association of English-Jewish Newspapers, National Editorial Association and
National Newspaper Association and its Capital Club.
Published every Friday by The Jewish News Publishing Co., 17515 W. Nine Mile, Suite 865, Southfield, Mich. 48075
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jewish News, 17515 W. Nine Mile, Suite 865, Southfield, Mich. 48075
Second-Class Postage Paid at Southfield, Michigan and Additional Mailing Offices. Subscription $15 a year.

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ
Business Manager

Editor and Publisher

ALAN HITSKY
News Editor

HEIDI PRESS
Associate News Editor

DREW LIEBERWITZ
Advertising Manager

Sabbath Scriptural Selections

CO MMISSION

This Sabbath, the 20th day of Adar, 5743, the following scriptural selections will be read in our synagogues:

OF INQU IRY
it tro THE
BetRuT

Pentateuchal portion, Exodus 30:11-34:35, Numbers 19:1-22. Prophetical portion, Ezekiel 36:16-38.

Candlelighting, Friday, March 4, 6:09 p.m.

VOL. LXXXIII, No. 1

Page Four

miNs0c 0

Friday, March 4, 1983

DIPLOMATIC DIGNITIE S

White House proclamations have begun to
draw more attention than either the United Na-
tions or the capitals of the Arab world. Out of
them, "peace" often emerges as a debatable and
puzzling term, and diplomatic dignities are art-
fully juggled.

A major item on the agenda is the Jorda-
nian factor in the search for peace, and the em-
phasis is on King Hussein. The problem is with
an approach that deviates from the first peace
move in the Middle East — that which ema-
nated from Anwar Sadat's Jerusalem visit and
the subsequent Camp David negotiations and
decisions.

It is in relation to the latter that the Middle
East situation should be tested. In the Sadat
instance there were negotiated proceedings and
they were not preconditioned. It is different
with Jordan and King Hussein. His representa-
tives have already indicated that any approach
to peace must be preceded by the immediate
withdrawal of Israeli troops from Lebanon and
the abandonment of settlements in Judea and
Samaria, which is termed the West Bank in the
commonly emphasized references to an area
that was originally part of territory assigned to
the Jewish state and was occupied by Jordan in
the 1948 Israel War of Independence, destined
to be liberated by Israel in the 1967 Six-Day
War.

as in recent instances, attitudes toward Israel
and the peace processes were stymied by hat-
reds for Israel's leaders, primarily the prime
minister.
There is an emerging leadership whose op-
erations have a dignity all their own. This was
demonstrated by the tributes to the retiring Is-
raeli envoy in the U.S. and. the examples he may
be setting for his confreres in the Israel gov-
ernment.

In a critical analysis of the current situa-
tion in the Middle East, with some challenged
approaches to it by the Reagan Administration,
Suzanne Garment had this to say about the
retired Israel ambassador:
"These have been tough times for U.S.-
Israeli relations — somewhat less tough be-
cause of the presence in Washington of Israel's,
ambassador, Moshe Arens, leaving for
Jerusalem now to become defense minister. One
of Mr. Arens' virtues was that he represented
his government wholeheartedly instead of by
arranging, by gesture and nuance, to spend half
his time apologizing for it. The Israelis would do
well to try for the same quality next time
around."

_ Here is an exemplary policy that must wel-
come respect for fellow diplomats. It is not al-
ways an easy road. Anti-Israel prejudices have
been evidenced in the highest quarters. They
The settlements involve serious considera- did not meet acceptance. This applies to those
tions regarding the right of people to settle who defend Israel. The 51 U.S. Senators who are
peacefully in territories for which there are au- sponsoring a resolution calling for direct peace
tonomy plans. In the planning for peace, the talks with Israel, gives emphasis to support for
autonomy question, already introduced in the a self-respecting Israeli position that adheres to
Camp David agreements, must play a major the need for peace deliberations without condi-
tions. The fact that 14 Republicans joined 37
role. The mistreatment of the issue has added to
Democrats
in sponsoring the proposed Senator-
the miseries of painful charges that interrupt
ial action is a happy counterpart to the obstacles
peace talk.
to Israel's quest for peace.
In the matter of Israel's -withdrawal from
The means for approaching peace, without
Lebanon, something surely prayed for by Is-
conditions and devoid of prejudices, obviating
raelis and their friends everywhere, there is an
injustice that must not be permitted to retain a "guarantees," is much clearer than the muddied
interpretations heard so often in public dis-
continuing influence. President Ronald Reagan
cussions.
Erasing indignities and threats,
may be as guilty as many others who keep de-
adhering
to
the realities that are akin to a
manding Israel's withdrawal while playing ig-
norant of the original sin — the Syrian occupa- willingness for antagonists to meet humanely,
for talks as neighbors seeking a civilized accord,
tional position in a tortured Lebanon and the
presence there of the criminal PLO forces. The must include an avoidance of inconsistencies by
singling out of Israel for a withdrawal role the White House in adding diviseness among
The road to peace can thus be made less
without similar demands for those who caused nations.
difficult.
the Lebanese miseries since 1976 is an unfair
treatment of the issue.

POLITICAL 'PLEDGES'

The great need is to assure the establish-
ment of a sovereign Lebanese authority and in
that process peace with Israel is vital. When the
President of the United States speaks of
"guarantees," he must not be incautious. Israel
rejects any attempt by others to provide mili-
tary defense for her territorial borders and the
emphasis from this country must be in the form
of a cooperative spirit that rejects preconditions,
that demands face-to-face talk with antagonists
and asks for a firmness that will not tolerate
wishy-washy rhetoric.
It is hardly to the credit of diplomats that,

A nationally syndicated columnist this
week paid her respects to three past Presidents
of the United States for having endorsed recog-
nition for "the Palestinians" in American rela-
tions, with a comment that they found it im-
possible or difficult to do so while in office.
What about the campaign pledges that are
constantly made while office-seeking, and then
shelving them into obscurity while in office?
Perhaps the latter question is more vital at
this time when the race for Presidential nomi-
nations has already commenced for the 1984
race.

aukJTA

Bierman's `Righteous Gentile'
Updates Wallenberg Story

Rated among the most thoroughly researched works on Raoul
Wallenberg, "Righteous Gentile" by John Bierman has just been
issued as a paperback by Bantam Books.
First issued in September 1981 as a hard-cover book by Viking, it
was reviewed in The Jewish News Oct. 9, 1981. In that review,
Bierman's studies of the Wallenberg case were thus commended:
"The Wallenberg case has been on
the agenda since his arrest by the Rus-
sians in Budapest on Jan. 17, 1945. He
has not been heard from since. The
Soviet Union has claimed he died as its
prisoner, and reports that he has been
seen alive revived the demand for his
release.
"Bierman was a television corres-
pondent for the British Broadcasting
Corporation in Israel and he learned
about Wallenberg at that time.
"In the two years of his becoming
acquainted with the story of the great
hero, Bierman produced a most im-
pressive work. His 'Righteous Gentile'
-----
has more facts about the personal life
RAOUL WALLENBERG
of the unusual person than anything
M,W777.'
that had been written previously.
"The delay in action in behalf of the
man who rescued so many — Gideon
Hausner who prosecuted Adolf
Eichmann said Wallenberg saved
30,000; some figures run up to 100,000
— should not have been ignored and
history therefore robbed of immediacy
in treating a very great occurrence."
In the Bantam paperback, Bier-
man updated the Wallenberg saga. In
a postscript, he gives an account of the
deep interest in the Wallenberg case
shown in this country. He gives an ac-
count of the Congressional honor, dec-
laring Raoul Wallenberg an honorary
U.S. citizen, a tribute with only one
precedent,
the similar designation
JOHN BIERMAN
given Winston Churchill.
Bierman mentions the Congressional vote, only two members of
the House of Representatives having voted against awarding the
honorary citizenship to Wallenberg.
He gives a full account of the signing of the honorary citizenship
award by President Ronald Reagan at the White House, on Oct. 5,
1981, in the presence of Wallenberg's half-sister and half-brother,
Mrs. Lagergren and Mr. Von Dardel.
Bierman also quotes from Reagan's speech at that ceremony in
the Rose Garden of the White House.
It should be noted, as Bierman does in the postscript, that the
Congressional honor to Wallenberg occurred only a matter of days
after the publication of his "Righteous Gentile."
So much renewed interest is being shown on an international
scale in the Wallenberg case that the Bierman book is being credited
with much of the concern and a great deal of the protesting sentiment
against the Russian silence on the demands for Wallenberg's release.
The assumption, based on recent reports from returnees from Russian
prisons, continues to emphasize the assumption that the great war
hero is still alive.

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