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March 04, 1983 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22 Friday, March 4, 1983

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Israel, Arabs Trade Charge
Over Incidents in Hebron

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Two Jews were detained by
police in Hebron Monday on
suspicion of attacking an
Arab vehicle in the center of
town with light weapons
early Monday. There
were no casualties. The sus-
pects were not immediately
identified.
They were the first ar-
rested after a series of at-
tacks on Arab targets in
Hebron, believed to be in
reprisal for the stonings of
Israeli vehicles.
A bomb exploded outside
a mosque in Hebron last
Friday, shortly before wor-
shippers ended their prayer
services. Unidentified
gunmen attacked several
Arab buildings near the
Jewish religious , suburb of
Kiryat Arba Saturday
night. A four-year-old Arab

girl was wounded.
Meanwhile, the acting
mayor of Hebron, Mus-
tapha- Natshe, accused
Jewish settlers in the ab-
duction of two Arab
teenagers from a nearby
high school. Natshe
claims the two teenagers
were kidnapped by four
men from a Jewish set-
tlement near Yatta.
The Israeli military
command said the youths
were arrested in Yatta after
they had thrown rocks at
the settlers' automobile.
The police have set up a
special investigating unit to
look into the incidents in
the Hebron area. Natshe
sent a telegram to Defense
Minister Moshe Arens this
week demanding an end to
"attacks. by Jews against
Hebron residents."

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Jockeying Begins on Israel Presidency

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JERUSALEM (JTA) —
With the Knesset's election
for the next president only
three weeks away (March
22) the political parties are
moving into high gear in
their efforts to select candi-
dates to replace retiring
President Yitzhak Navon.
Both Likud and Labor
have set up small commit-
tees of leading Knesseters
to work on this issue. Politi-

`Passover Feast'
Cookbook Printed

NEW YORK — "The
Passover Feast II," a
Passover cookbook pub-
lished by the West Orange
Chapter of American Miz-
rachi Women, offers the
Jewish homemaker expla-
nations of the Passover laws
and customs in addition to
more than 1,000 holiday re-
cipes which can be used dur-
ing the entire year.
A special chapter devoted
to the significance of
Passover and its dietary
rules includes an exposition
on the symbolism of the
Seder plate and its compo-
nents. The cookbook also of-
fers both "gebrochts" and
"not gebrochts" recipes
("gebrochts" refers to foods
that combine a grain flour
such as matzo meal with
certain liquids; these foods
are eaten by many families
only on the last day of
Passover).
Other features of the
cookbook include: a 63-page
section on meals and poul-
try; low-calorie, low-
cholesterol fish recipes; a
chapter devoted entirely to
breakfast and dairy dishes;
and desserts that run the
gamut from fresh fruits to
chocolate mousse and
homemade candy.
Proceeds from sales of the
cookbook benefit disadvan-
taged children in American
Mizrachi Women projects in
Israel.
"The Passover Feast II" is
available at $11 per copy
from Sandy Cantor, 6 Sub-
urban Dr., West Orange,
N.J. 07052. Checks accom-
panying orders should be
made payable to American
Mizrachi Women - West
Orange Chapter.
Following is a sample re-
cipe from "The Passover
Feast II":

Mock Pizza

BASIC CRUST
3 cups matzo fade!
21/2 cups boiling water
5 eggs
salt and pepper, to taste

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TOPPING
1 pkg. sliced American
cheese, 8 slices
1 can tomato and mushroom
sauce
garlic and onion powder
Pour boiling water over far-
fel to make soggy. Beat eggs
together with salt and pepper.
Pour over farfel; mix well. Di-
vide mixture onto 8 greased 5"
individual pizza pans (20 min-
utes) or 1 large pizza pan (30
minutes). Bake in 350 degree
oven until set. Then cover
each pizza with tomato and
mushroom sauce. Cut cheese
into strips; divide among
pizza. Sprinkle with garlic and
onion powder. Bake in oven
until cheese melts, about 8 to
10 minutes.

cal pundits say veteran Na-
tional Religious Party
leader Yosef Burg seams the
most widely-supported
potential candidate at this
point.
Within the coalition,
Herut, La-am Agudat Yis-
rael and the NRP are known
to be prepared to back Burg,
though Tami will oppose
him (because of the
longstanding feud between
Burg and Tami's leader
Aharon Abu Hatzeira).
Burg however, has not
yet confirmed his candi-
dacy. He has indicated
that he will do so only if
and when it becomes
clear that he would re-
ceive broad support not
only from coalition quar-
ters but from sections of
the opposition too.
So far, Labor has been re-
serving its position. Within
the party there are two men
who are seen as possible
candidates themselves:
Shlomo Hillel MK and
Chaim Herzog MK. Hillel
has the advantage of being a
Sephardi, and Herzog has

the advantage of being the
son of the late Chief Rabbi
Isaac Herzog (and thus
likely to be an acceptable
choice among the religious
parties). It is unlikely, how-
ever, that either of these
Labor men would win sup-
port from the coalition.
Coalition members would
consider it unacceptable for
a Labor opposition figure to
be elected president twice in
a row during Likud's in-
cumbency in government.
Tami is still pushing the
candidacy of Beersheba
Mayor Eliahu Nawi, and
Tami's Swiss Patron Nes-
sim Gaon was reported to
have canvassed Premier
Menahem Begin on Nawi's
behalf this week. Gaon
would also presumably sup-
port a Herzog candidacy,
since the two men are re-
lated by marriage.
Several Knesset mem-
bers of both opposition and
coalition factions are urging
Navon to reconsider. A
spokesman for the
President replied that his
decision was final.

The Two Jewish Inquiries

By RABBI MARCH
TANENBAUM

Two highly-publicized
Jewish public inquiries took
place recently — one in
Jerusalem and one in New
York. The Jerusalem in-
quiry on the massacres by
the Phalangists become an
instant international event
and despite the turmoil, it
was on one level a good
thing for Jews and Israel.

French Write Off
Terror Suspects

PARIS (JTA) — French
police officials back from
Madrid where they interro-
gated a number of arrested
Spanish neo-fascists do not
believe they were involved
in the terrorist attack
against the Paris Liberal
Synagogue on the Rue
Copernic which killed four
people in October 1980.
Police sources said the
Spanish authorities now
also doubt the arrested men
were involved in any ter-
rorist attacks outside Spain.
The French are just as
skeptical about the partici-
pation of the arrested five
West German neo-Nazis in
the attack on a Jewish res-
taurant in Paris last sum-
mer. A French investigat-
ing magistrate, Jean-Louis
Bruguiere and several
police officers are in London
where two of the arrested
terrorists are held.
One of the two, Walter
Kexel, looks somewhat
similar to a member of
the hit squad which last
Aug. 9 attacked a Jewish
restaurant in the old
Paris ghetto killing six
people and wounding 22,
but first reports say he
does not seem to have
been involved in the at-
tack.
The French Ministry of
Justice said, however, that
all clues will be followed
and all possible suspects
will be thoroughly investi-
gated.

The second public inquiry
surrounded the American
Commission on the
Holocaust, and it left much
to be desired.
The Jerusalem inquiry
made it abundantly clear
that democracy is alive and
well in Israel. No other gov-
ernment in modern history,
including the great Ameri-
can democracy, has sum-
moned to moral accounta-
bility its top leaders — from
government, the military,
and the intelligence corps.
There will be inevitable
turmoil as the political
jockeying goes on after
the Israel Cabinet voted
to accept the recom-
mendations of the com-
mission. But the message
to the world is unmistak-
able -- no Arab or Mus-
lim government would
have ever counte-
nanced such a thorough-
going expression of the
democratic process and
survived.
The American Commis-
sion on the Holocaust,
headed by the distinguished
Jewish leader, Justice Ar-
thur Goldberg, has notable
purposes, namely the exam-
ination of the response of
the world and in particular
the Jewish world to the
trauma of the Holocaust.
Unfortunately, if not
tragically, this inquiry has
been caught up in a crossfire
of tasteless publicity that
would seem to trivialize the
Holocaust itself. Two weeks
ago, the commission met
with Justice Goldberg and
made a serious attempt to
restore this effort to a level
of dignity which has in
many ways been the
hallmark of the Jerusalem
inquiry.

Crime Decline

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
Crime in Israel dropped
nearly 10 percent last year,
with home burglaries de-
clining 18 percent.

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