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January 14, 1983 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

62 Friday, January 14, 1983

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

WUJS Institute in Israel

Shown at the World Union of Jewish Students
Institute at Arad are a group of young professionals
from Michigan who are considering aliya. Standing
from left are: Michael Copeland, director of the insti-
tute, and Cathy Shuman, Paul Needleman and Magda
Mourad. Seated are: David Holzle, Karen Weinberg
and Eric Friedman.

New Testament Anti-Jewry
Topic of Indiana U. Parley

By BEN GALLOB

what he called the combina-
tion of anti-Semitism and
Most of the 40 Jewish and "extraordinary" literary
Christian scholars, con- force in the rhetoric of the
fronting the problems of Gospel of John.
anti-Semitism in the New
Prof. Bloom declared
Testament at a recent In- that the Gospel of John
diana University confer- took over and reversed
ence, rejected the view pre- certain elements from the
sented by one of America's Old Testament to assert
leading literary critics that, the priority and superior-
all efforts to overcome the ity of the Christian faith.
"assault" of the Gospel of
In disagreeing with that
John against Judaism and view, Prof. James A. San-
the "inherent hostility" be- ders of the Claremont
tween Christianity and School of Theology cited the
Judaism were hopeless.
remarkable revival of the
The conference, convened study of Hebrew Scriptures
by the National Jewish Re- by Christian scholars. He
source Center and the In- said much of what they had
diana University Jewish discovered not only broke
Studies department, was the negative images of the
the third in a series started Old Testament portrayed in
in 1978, and sought to the New Testament, but
explore the impact of the they also suggested
Holocaust on fundamental guidelines to recover the
thinking in the areas of fullness of the Jewish reli-
religion, literature and his- gion and to challenge the
tory. The conference theme distortions and stereotypes
was "Sacred Texts: in the New Testament.
Heremeneutics of Religious
Prof. Clark Williamson of
Literature in a Post- the Christian Theological
Holocaust Age."
Seminary, assailed the "ad-
The pessimistic view versos Judaeoa" tradition,
about the intractability of the negative portrayal of
Christian hostility was of- Judaism in the Gospel, and
fered by Prof. Harold Bloom afterward, to show how that
of Yale University. He drew tradition had both distorted
on his own work in literary basic Christian values and
criticism theory to detail been unfair to Jews.

(Copyright 1983, JTA, Inc.)

MK Urges Trial for Nazis

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim, speaking before the
Knesset, called on West
Germany last week to nul-
lify the acquittal of two Nazi
war criminals and to have
the two placed on trial
again.
Wilhelm Westerheide
and Yohanna Zelle, who
were tried in Dortmund on
charges of participation in
the murder of 9,000 Jews in
the Vladimir ghetto, were
recently acquitted. Nissim

spoke in reply to an urgent
motion to the agenda by an
Alignment member of the
Knesset, Prof. Shevah
Weiss.

Weiss said the fight
against the "deformation of
mankind, as it was ex-
pressed in Nazi crimes dur-
ing the Holocaust" had to be
fought constantly. He. said
"it is not merely a matter of
revenge, although that too
is legitimate in this con-
text."

Daniel Cullen, Nationally Acclaimed
Attorney, Jewish Community Leader

Daniel Cullen, who
earned acclaim nationally
in patent law and whose
role communally was in top
ranks congregationally and
in Zionist devotions, died
Jan. 11 in Encino, Calif. He
was 80.
For an entire half century
active in patent law, his
association here with Ber-
nard Cantor was since 1952.
Cantor describes him as a
"mensch in a Jewish total-
ity," taking note also not
only of his professional
skills but as much for his
devotion to synagogue and
its educational aims and for
his Zionist devotions.
While his major
synagogue interest was
with Cong. Shaarey Zedek,
he was in evidence in major
Zionist affairs and he was
often seen in front ranks in
behalf of the Zionist Organ-
ization of America and the
Jewish National Fund.

At the same time, he
also had a deep fraternal
interest and as a founder

Shaarey Zedek since 1936
and served as chairman of
its education committee and
helped organize kibutz re-
treats of the men's club. He -
also was affiliated with
musical activities in the
community.
Mr. Cullen also a member
of the Detroit Bar Associa-
tion, State Bar of Michigan,
American Patent Law
Association, American
Technion Society and
Hadassah Associates.

.

DANIEL CULLEN

of the Probus Club he in-
spired community inter-
ests in many forms.
Before coming to Detroit,
Mr. Cullen was a patent
examiner for five years in
the U.S. Patent Office in
Washington, D.C. In 1952,
he co-founded the patent
law firm with Cantor
known as Cullen, Sloman,
Cantor, Graver, Scott and
Rutherford.
He was a member of

Esther Untermeyer Dies

NEW YORK — Esther
Antin Untermeyer, a
former Municipal Court
judge in Toledo and an
active Zionist who cam-
paigned for the creation of
the state of Israel, died Jan.
4 at age 88.
Married to the poet Louis
Untermeyer, Mrs. Unter-
meyer was a co-founder of
the American League for
Free Palestine and was a
member of its executive
board and its treasurer in
the 1940s. She was divorced

from Untermeyer in 1945.
Mrs. Untermeyer was an
executive board member of
Herut Zionists of America,
and during a visit of
Menahem Begin here in
1980, he awarded her the
Jabotinsky Medal for "dis-
tinguished service to Israel
and the Jewish people."
After leaving the bench,
she practiced law briefly
and worked as a freelance
editor for New York pub-
lishers of books by young
Jewish authors.

Commenting on a Wall
Street Journal article de-
scribing King Hussein's
great-grandfather Sharif
Hussein as "pushed from his
throne in Western Arabia
after World War I by West-
ern powers because he
wouldn't accept a Jewish
homeland in Palestine," Dr.
M. Donald Coleman of
Mamaroneck, N.Y. wrote
the following letter which
was recently published by
the business daily:
"Sharif Hussein lost his
throne to Ibn Saud's forces
in their 1902-1924 conquest
of most of the Arabian
peninsula, to which they
then gave their family
name.
"Far from being pushed
out by Western powers, the
Hashemite family actually
appealed to Britain for help
in the struggle with the
Saudis. This aid was refused
on the ground that Chris-
tians should not be involved
in the Arab struggle over
the Holy City of Mecca.
"Yet the English favored
the Hashemites by giving
Sharif Hussein's son Fei-
sal a kingdom in Iraq and

Answers Student
Queries on Torah

FLORENCE GOLDFARB

of Tempe, Ariz., and Mrs.
Morris (Sybil) Fenkell; a
brother, Charles Frieden-
berg of Miami Beach; a sis-
ter, Mrs. Samuel (Mary)
Heyman of San Francisco,
Calif.; eight grandchildren
and five great-
grandchildren.

He is survived by his wife,
Sadye; a son, Dr. David of
Newton Center, Mass.; two
daughters, Mrs. Allen
(Eleanor) Botney of Encino
and Mrs. William (Marian)
Shulevitz of New York City;
and nine grandchildren.
Interment California.

M.E. His tort Lesson

Mrs. Goldfarb Memorialized
by Hadassah and the JNF
NY Hotline

Scores of Hadassah and
Jewish National Fund trib-
utes paid honor this week to
Florence Goldfarb, who died
Jan. 6 at age 82.
Mrs. Goldfarb had a re-
cord of more than 30 years
in Hadassah and JNF ac-
tivities here and in Miami
Beach, Fla.
On her 80th birthday, in
recognition of four decades
of services to Zionist causes,
a JNF garden in Israel, a
cluster of trees planted by
her grandchildren and an
inscription in the Golden
Book in Jerusalem, paid
tribute to Mrs. Goldfarb.
She was president of her
Hadassah chapter in Miami
Beach, after serving the De-
troit affiliate for many
years.
Mrs. Goldfarb leaves
three daughters, Mrs. Rae
Zamler, Mrs. Beatrice Adler

He was graduated from
Tufts University and
earned his JD degree at
George Washington Uni-
versity.

NEW YORK (JTA) —
"Torah Homework Hot-
line," a pilot project estab-
lished early in December to
help yeshiva and day school
students in their Jewish
studies, has been averaging
150 calls a week from stu-
dents with questions about
their homework.
The "hotline" was estab-
lished by a group of students
at Yeshiva University and
the university's affiliated
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary.
The "hotline" is open to
both elementary and high
school students from 7 to 9
p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays. High School
students may call (212)
960-5450. Elementary stu-
dents may call (212) 960-
5350.

"Over 65 years of traditional service in the Jewish community with dignity and understanding.

HEBREW MEMORIAL CHAPEL

by carving a kingdom out
of the Palestinian Man-
date (TransJordan) for
Abdulla, Hussein's other
son. The Hashemite his-
tory of being dispos-
sessed by the Saudis and
acting as proxies of the
British creates a political
burden for King Hussein.
"It is a grave mistake to
think that the Palestinian
problem is the only source of
tension in the Middle East.
This complex region hai
been and continues to be
torn by many other bitter
feuds."

Ben Benn Dies

NEW YORK — Ben
Benn, a still-life and land-
scape painter associated
with the Cubist school, died
Jan. 7 at age 98.
Ne Benjamin Rosenberg,
Mr. Benn had one-man
shows at the Jewish
Museum in New York and
the Hirshhorn Museum and
Sculpture Garden in Wash-
ington. He participated in
group shows at the Museum
of Modern Art and the Met-
ropolitan (New York)
Museum of Art.
His work appears in
many art museums. He re-
ceived the Schiedt Award of
the Pennsylvania Academy
of Fine Arts in 1951. He was
a member of the National
Academy of Design.

Louis Goodman

Louis J. Goodman, retired
life insurance underwriter,
died Jan. 7 at age 88.
Born in Russia, Mr.
Goodman was affiliated
with Mutual of New York
for more than 55 years. He
w4s a charter member of
Temple Israel and a
member of Bnai Brith,
Goodfellows, Hannah
Schloss Old Timers and
Mutual Life Underwriters.
He leaves his wife, Reva;
a daughter, Mrs. Lois
Rambo of Los Angeles,
Calif.; a brother, Jacob; a
sister, Mrs. Frank (Esther)
Barcus; two grandchildren
and one great-
granddaughter.

543.1622

SERVING ALL CEMETERIES

26640 GREENFIELD ROAD
OAK PARK, MICHIGAN 48237

Alan H. Dorfman
Funeral Director & Mgr.

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