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January 07, 1983 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1983-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

20 Friday, January 1, 1983

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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Histadrut to Continue to Bid
on Housing in the Territories

COMMERCIAL AND SOCIAL STATIONERY

OWAY

TEL AVIV (JTA) —
Three leftwing components
of the Histadrut — Mapam,
Sheli and the Communist
Party -- have strongly pro-
tested a Histadrut decision
to allow the labor federa-

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tion's construction com-
panies to continue to oper-
ate within the West Bank.
The labor federation's
holding company Hevrat
Ovdim decided Monday
after a lengthy debate, that
the Histadrut had on this
issue to be governed by eco-
nomic considerations, and
not by political philsophy.
It said the Histadrut
construction companies
would have to dismiss
workers if it did not win
bids for housing in the
administered territories.
. If the Histadrut's Sollel
Boneh and other corn-
panies did not build
there, other private com-
panies would do so.
The Hevrat Ovidim said
that the decision to build
should be taken on sensible
economic grounds, and not
to make a quick profit. Op-
ponents of continued Judea
and Samaria building said
that by accepting housing in
the territories, the Histad-
rut and its majority Labor
Party component were com-
promising their ideals.

Education is the appren-
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`Between You
. . . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA

(Copyright 1983, JTA, Inc.)

MILITARY INTELLIGENCE: No country in the
world, besides the U.S., conducts courses in training mili-
tary officers and instructors to combat bigotry, anti-
Semitism, and racial and religious discrimination.
The Defense Department maintains a special institute
in which a 16-week course on these subjects is given in a
repeated form three terms a year. The students are selected
by their commanding officers in the Army, Navy, Air Force,
Coast Guard and Marine Corps. They are then sent to the
institute which is located at the Patrick Air Force Base in
Florida to spend four months there as residents. After
graduating, they return to their service installations as-
signed as specialists in the field of human and racial rela-
tions.
The institute is officially known as the Defense Equal
Opportunity Management Institute.
The institute also conducts a one-year correspondence
course for non-residents. It is designed for Army and Navy
Reserve and National Guard personnel. The non-resident
students attend an initial two-week resident session at
Patrick, then complete five months of correspondence
work, attend a regional seminar, complete an additional six
months of correspondence and return to the institute for a
final two-week residence training period prior to gradua-
tion. Resident as well as non-resident graduates receive
academic credits.
The graduates are a great asset later in the work of
combating racial and religious prejudice in the armed
forces and in the civilian population.
THE JEWISH COMPONENT: A look at the 1983
curriculum of the institute provides a good idea of the
lectures there on contemporary and historical perspectives
of Jews in the United States as an ethnic group, their
culture and consciousness.
In addition to attending lessons given by faculty mem-
bers, the students are also required to do research on any
subject in the curriculum to prepare themselves to give a
lecture, during their 16-week study period, on a chosen
subject. The lecture by each student is followed by discus-
sion in the class and both the lecture and the discussion are
televised and taped. The student presentations during 1983
are listed as follows:
Anti-Semitism in America today, the U.S. position in
the Middle East, the U.S. position on human rights for
Soviet Jewry, contemporary arguments about the
Holocaust, American Jews and civil liberties, cultural
pluralism and the American JeAr in the 1980s, the black
Jew today, anti-Semitism — a world problem, terrorism —
a threat to human rights and contemporary problems of
Jewish military families.
The curriculum also deals with projects of the Anti-
Defamation League of Bnai Brith, American Jewish Com-
mittee and other Jewish organizations engaged in fighting
bigotry. There is also a lesson on "Skokie and the First
Amendment."

Israel Economy Down in '82

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Israel's economy performed
poorly in 1982, but Israelis
as a whole lived better, if
their rate of consumption is
a guide to the good life.
Year-end figures released
by the Central Bureau of
Statistics showed that in
1982, for the first time in 30
years, Israel's gross na-
tional product failed to in-
crease by so much as a dec-
imal point. But purchases of
consumer goods were up 16
percent.
The international bal-
ance of payments deficit —
the difference between Is-
rael's hard currency re-
serves and what it owes
overseas creditors — in-
creased by a half billion dol-
lars.
Real wages declined by
three percent on the av-
erage; the wages of civil
servants were eroded a
full six percent in value
by triple-digit inflation.
But, private consumption
of all consumables rose
five percent.

A treasury spokesman
said the economy was not all
that bad. He cited stability
in exports, employment and
increased investments.

Israel's economy is linked
to most Western economies
which are in almost con-
tinuous crisis, he said. But
for Israel, 1982 could turn
out to have been a "great
economic success story."

The Central Bureau also
provided some encouraging
data: Increased invest-
ments in machinery and
industrial equipment and a
slight decrease in the
number of unemployed.

Rabbis Group
Meets in N.Y.

NEW YORK — "Nuclear
Armaments An
Analysis," will be the theme
of the Rabbinical Council of
America's midwinter con-
ference Jan. 17-19 at the
Homowack Lodge, Spring
Glen, N.Y.

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