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December 24, 1982 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-12-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, December 24, 1982 1

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

ipmeemsomma......1

Israel-Lebanon Talks Facing Moslem Opposition

(Continuedfrom Page 1)
looked good on paper but its
real test would be its trans-
lation, during negotiations,
from principles into de-
tailed arrangements and
provisions.
Sharon said the document
provided for a formal "end of
belligerency" between Is-
rael and Lebanon.
It comprised three main
sections: withdrawal, nor-
malization and security ar-
rangements. Other sources
told JTA that there is a
specific provision that all
three key elements will be
negotiated as one package
— a provision which Israel
regards as especially impor-
tant from the political
standpoint.
On withdrawal, the
document deals with
prospective IDF with-
drawal from Lebanon,
but the unstated under-
standing, of course, is
that this will come simul-
taneously with Syrian
and PLO withdrawal
from the areas of Leba-
non under their control.
Sharon told the Knesset
committee Tuesday that
he believed Syria was not
ready for at least a first-
stage withdrawal, lead-
ing to a separation of
forces between the Sy-
rians and the IDF. But Is-
rael would not agree to
execute a first-stage until
all subsequent stages
have been agreed upon
and scheduled.
Israeli officials believe
that the readiness of high
Lebanese figures to con-
clude the working paper
with Sharon (their precise
, identities have not been re-
vealed) itself attests to their
feeling that the Syrians are
indeed ready to accept' the
principle of simultaneous

withdrawal — despite the
formal Damascus position
demanding total IDF
evacuation before the Sy-
rian army begins to move
back.
On normalization, ac-
cording to Israeli sources,
the document provides for
the principle of borders open
for the passage of persons
and goods. But these
sources anticipate long and
tough negotiations on how
much normalization will be
applied, and how fast it will
be applied.
The working paper also
provides for a permanent
channel of communication
between the two govern-
ments, in the form of an Is-
raeli diplomatic office that
will remain in Beirut "until
full peace" when full-
fledged embassieS will be
established. Sharon indi-
cated to the Knesset com-
mittee that no similar offi-
cial Lebanese representa-
tion in Israel is con-
templated at this stage.
The Israeli Cabinet an-
nounced Sunday that Is-
rael has dropped its de-
mand that negotiations
with Lebanon be held
alternately in Jerusalem
and Beirut and stated
that "the venue of the
negotiations will be de-
termined in contacts be-
tween the governments
of Israel and Lebanon."
The announcement ap-
peared to remove a major
obstacle.
President Reagan in
Washington over the
weekend characterized the
armies of Israel, Syria and
the Palestine Liberation
Organization forces still in
Lebanon as "armies of occu-
pation," a description which
he seemed to apply most
emphatically to the Israeli

army. In addition, U.S. spe-
cial envoy Philip Habib de-
livered a letter from Reagan
to Premier Menahem Begin
last Thursday in which the
President forcefully urged
Israel to pull out of Lebanon
without further delay.
The contents of Reagan's
letter were not disclosed,
but informed sources said it
put the onus primarily on
Israel for the negotiations
impasse of the past few
weeks.
Habib and U.S. special
envoy Morris Draper, just
back from Beirut, confirmed
to Israeli officials that there
seemed to have been a major
advance.
After meeting with
Habib and Draper, Begin
convened his Cabinet to
announce the govern-
ment's change of position
on the issue of venue.
While some ministers
wanted to blur what they
saw as a backing down
by Israel, Begin insisted,
according to Cabinet
sources, that the an-
nouncement be made
straightforwardly and
clear.
He insisted that the na-
tional interest required that
Israel make the concession
so that agreements already
concluded informally with
Lebanon can be formalized
without delay.
Reagan's comments in
Washington indicated that
he was fast losing patience
over the lack of movement
in Lebanon. He told the
Washington Post in an
interview published Friday
that "the time has come now
for the foreign forces that
are there — Syria, Israel
and the remnant of the
PLO" to pull out of Lebanon.
"For these countries to
delay in getting out 'now

places them in the position
of being occupying armies,"
he said, according to the
Post.
He added, the Post re-
ported, that for Israel to be
in Lebanon on invitation or
when it was being attacked
from across the Lebanese
border was one thing, but
for them to be there now was
something else. "The
Lebanese government has
enough confidence in itself
that it has asked them (the
Israelis) to leave and to not
leave is, as I say, to make
themselves an occupying
force," the President was
quoted by the Post.
He sounded the same
theme in comments to
radio reporters Sunday.
"The main thing right
now that- we have AM-_
bassador Habib and
Draper working on in the
Middle East is to get what
now constitutes armies of
occupation — the PLO,
the Syrians and the Is-
raelis — out of Lebanon
and let the Gemayel gov-
ernment have the sover-
eignty of their own coun-
try," Reagan said.
The President also said
the withdrawal of the
foreign forces from Lebanon
was a first step in resolving
the Middle East conflict.
"Then we move on to the
peace process in solving the
Palestinian problem and

By BEN GALLOB

ta,u: a

Ir.,

The percentages of
vandalized synagogues,
reported in the newslet-
ter for other states, were:
32 percent in California,
32 percent in Florida, 38
percent in Illinois and 19
percent in Texas.
The Wiesenthal Center
newsletter reported that the
poll was commissioned "to
gain . a better perspective"
on how rabbis evaluated
"the seriousness of anti-
Semitic manifestations in
their communities." The
newsletter declared that
"during the past few years
there has been a noticeable
increase in anti-Semitic in-
cidents throughout the
United States."
Another finding, accord-
ing to the newsletter sum-
mary, was that California
"is the only state to report a
large number of attacks on
other Jewish institutions in
the last three years."
A polling firm official
was asked to elaborate
on the comment in the
newsletter summary
that, "given these statis-
tics, programs on anti-
Semitism are not as ex-

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tensive as they might be."
He confirmed that the
poll had sought to deter-
mine how many of the
rabbi respondents had
reported programs to
cope with anti-Semitic
vandalism.
The newsletter summary,
declared, on that point, that
"New York City synagogues
only had programs in 37
percent" of problem situa-
tions. The polling findings,
as described in the newslet-
ter summary, gave these
statistics for the other
states: programs in 70 per-
cent of California syna-
gogues; 60 percent in
Florida synagogues; 61 per-
cent in Illinois synagogues
and 57 percent in Texas
synagogues.

If. you are interested in such a position, you should:
• have contacts in the
Jewish community with families
who have children of camp age \
• have knowledge of camp life
• be interested in actively
representing the camp
For further information regarding the position and commission, or if
you would like tb receive one of our brochures, write or call collect:

•TED COLE—DIRECTOR
3995 Bathurst Street, Suite 206
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Staff applications are now being accepted for the 1983 season.

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High Traffic Toll

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
Last year, Israel had 385
traffic fatalities and
thousands of injuries in
traffic accidents.

Anger makes dull men
witty, but it keeps them
poor.

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Poll Hints Rabbis Fail to See
Extent of Synagogue Desecration

NEW YORK (JTA) —
Nearly 600 rabbis in five
states, polled recently on
the extent of anti-Semitic
vandalism against their
synagogues, generally indi-
cated caution in suggesting
such vandalism was a prob-
lem in their communities,
even in the face of specifics
to the contrary.
The poll was made by
Penn and Schoen Associ-
ates, a New York public re-
lations firm, on commission
from the Simon Wiesenthal
Center in Los Angeles.
A summary of the poll
was published in the fall/
winter issue of the Wie-
senthal Center's "Social Ac-
tion Update."
The summary declared
that "those who view van-
dalism against synagogues
as a phenomenon isolated in
one part of the country are
sadly mistaken." The news-
letter asserted that, in the
past three years, 57 percent
of New York City syna-
gogues had been van-
dalized, as were 49 percent
of synagogues throughout
New York state.

guaranteeing the security
of Israel's borders," Reagan
said.
On Tuesday, U.S. Ambas-
sador Samuel Lewis echoed
that sentiment while deny-
ing reports in Israel that the
U.S. wanted the Lebanese
situation resolved in the
context of any "Reagan In-
itiative."

I

I
I

Verl•talliSt. s S Y i i al 4.

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