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December 17, 1982 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, December 11, 1982 11

Sharon Blames U.S. for Impasse in Negotiations.

TEL AVIV (JTA) — De-
fense Minister Ariel Sharon
blamed the United States
for the impasse in negotia-
tions between Israel and
Lebanon.
Addressing a gathering of
West Bank settlers on
Tuesday, Sharon contended
that while the U.S. and Is-
rael had "identical inter-
ests," Washington was hin-
dering the peace process by
linking the Lebanon prob-
lem with implementation of
President Reagan's plan for
the West Bank.
The Reagan plan, an-
nounced Sept. 1, called for a
Palestinian entity associ-
ated with Jordan and urged
Israel to freeze its West
Bank settlement activities.
Sharon, for his part,
urged massive Jewish
settlement in the ter-
ritories, especially in the
mountainous areas
where the bulk of the
Arab population is con-
centrated. He stressed
that the West Bank would
not be annexed to Israel
but intimated that it
would not be necessary.
"If the rate of settlement
is increased, by the end of
the decade tens of
thousands and possibly
hundreds of thousands of
Jewish settlers will live
here," he said.
According to Sharon, Is-
rael and Lebanon are close
to an agreement on security
problems. But these, as well
as the question of a peace
agreement and normal rela-
tions can only be solved by
direct negotiations between
the two countries, he said.
He believed, however, that
shuttle diplomacy with the
U.S. acting as go-between
could achieve the with-
drawal of all foreign forces
from Lebanon.
American officials ac-
companying U.S. Secretary
of State George Shultz in
Rome reportedly said the
shuttle plan involving U.S.
envoys Philip Habib and
Morris Draper would be an
attempt to break the im-
passe in talks between Is-
rael and Lebanon over Is-
rael's insistence that they
be conducted in Jerusalem
and Beirut. The latest
Habib plan would remove
the question of venue, the
officials said.
Sharon told reporters
that he had not met with
U.S. officials in Washing-
ton during his latest trip be-
cause no such meetings had
been planned.
"I did not request any
meetings before leaving
for America and neither
did I request any meet-
ings during my stay in the
U.S.," he said. He said the
purpose of his short visit
to New York was to meet
with leaders of the
American Jewish com-
munity and explain some
of Israel's problems to
them.
Miles Pendleton, who
heads the Israel Desk at the
U.S. State Department, told
Israeli Deputy Foreign
Minister Yehuda Ben-Meir
in Jerusalem this week that
President Reagan wants to

ARIEL SHARON

speed up negotiations for a
settlement in Lebanon. But
it was not immediately
clear what the U.S. means
by a speedy settlement.
Following their meeting,
Ben-Meir told the Voice of
Israel Radio that Israel's
position remains that the
Palestine Liberation
Organization forces must
leave Lebanon first, to be
followed by simultaneous
withdrawals by the Syrian
and Israeli armies and a se-
curity agreement between
Israel and Lebanon that
would guarantee that their
borders would remain
peaceful "forever."
In Washington, a U.S.
spokesman stressed, "The
President has had a plan for
Lebanon for some time"
which "has three elements:
assuring Israel's security;
restoring Lebanon's sover-
eignty throughout the coun-
try; and the withdrawal of
all foreign forces."
However, he said, "Be-
yond that, in terms of
either substance or mod-
alities about what Am-
bassadors Habib abd
Draper are going to be
doing, we simply are not
going to be discussing it,
reverting to our previous
formalness. We think that
is the most effective way
of proceeding — through
quiet diplomacy."
While in the U.S. last
week, Sharon told a meet-
ing of the Conference of
Presidents of Major Ameri-
can Jewish Organizations
that Israel's demands for se-
curity arrangements in
Lebanon would include:
• No Arab army will
again be allowed into
Lebanese territory.
• Any other foreign forces
such as peace-keeping
troops must be from coun-
tries which recognize Israel.
• Lebanon will not permit
the military or political
presence of any terrorist
group on its soil.
• No artillery, rocket-
launchers or surface-to-air
missiles will be permitted in
the 45-50 kilometer zone
bordering on Israel.
• Israeli warning stations
will be operated in that zone
until a formal peace treaty
is signed.
Sharon warned that un-
less President Amin
Gemayel of Lebanon signs a
peace treaty with Israel he
will be the "President of the
Presidential Palace but not
of the country." He meant,
apparently, that Lebanon
would degenerate into war-
ring factions as was the

situation before the Israeli
campaign.
But Sharon insisted
that Israel was not put-
ting pressure on Leba-
non. "Nothing in our de-
mands go beyond the
normal security needs of
both countries," he said.
"There is nothing to be
ashamed of that we want
to have a peace treaty
with our neighbors, noth-
ing to be ashamed of that
we want to negotiate di-
rectly in our capital and
in their capital."
Sharon disclosed, accord-
ing to the source, that as of
Nov. 15 Israel formally
opened its border with
Lebanon with normal cus-
toms and passport controls
and that thousands of
Lebanese have crossed into
Israel for business or as
tourists. He did not say
where the border post is lo-
cated.
He claimed that commer-
cial normalization has al-
ready begun. He said $20
million worth of goods has
already entered Lebanon
from Israel, half of it being
Israeli exports and the rest
Lebanese imports from
other countries transhipped
via Israeli ports. Sharon
said Lebanese importer's
prefer to use Haifa to their
own ports.
Sharon said that between
January 1, 1965 and June 5,
1982, terrorists operating
from 'Lebanon caused over
7,000 casualties: 1,392 dead
and 6,239 wounded. He said
Israel had good relations
with the Lebanese in south
Lebanon long before June
1982.
He said these were not
only the Christians who
would not exist today
were it hot for Israel's
protection but. Moslems,
mainly Shiites, who also
suffered from the Pales-
tinian Liberation Organ-
ization. He said the
Shiites often prevented
the PLO from operating
against Israel from their
villages.

Beirut Massacre
Casualty Figures

Sharon said he could not
comment on the commission
of inquiry in Israel cur-
rently investigating the
massacres in the Shatila
and Sabra refugee camps in
west Beirut last September
because the matter is still
sub judice. However, he de-
clared, "I believe in Irael
justice."
He said that 479 persons
were killed in the Shatila

Israel Credit OK

TEL AVIV (ZINS) — The
international banking
community has become in-
creasingly concerned by
debts owed by Mexico,
Argentina, Brazil, Poland
and Romania. While Israel
has a large debt ($20 bil-
lion), 80 percent of it has
been borrowed from gov-
ernments and only 20 per-
cent from financial institu-.
tions.
Most of Israel's debt is
owed to the U.S., West
Germany, holders of Israel
Bonds and individual loans.

camp of whom 118 were
Lebanese, including 98
men, eight women and 12
children; 328 Palestinians,
including 313 men, seven
women and eight children;
seven Syrians; two Alge-
rians; three Pakistanis; and
21 Iranians — all of them
male.

Sharon said those figures
came from the Lebanese
Red Cross, the Interna-
tional Red Cross, the

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