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December 10, 1982 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

18 Friday, December 10, 1982

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Slepak Returns From Exile

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TORONTO (JTA) — Vla-
dimir Slepak of Moscow,
known as the father of the
Jewish emigration effort in
the Soviet Union and one of
the leading Jewish refus-
niks, returned to his home
from exile in Siberia where
he had served a five-year
sentence for "malicious
hooliganism," Genya Intra-
tor, chairman of the Cana-
dian Committee for Soviet
Jewry, reported.
Slepak's wife, Maria, re-
ceived a three-year sus-
pended sentence, at the
same time her husband was
sentenced, for the same of-
fense. Her sentence was
suspended for medical rea-
sons, Ms. Intrator said.

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Although Ms. Slepak, did
not have to go to Siberia, she
nevertheless spent the five
years in exile with her hus
band near the Chinese bor-
der in Tzochto-Changil.
In a related develop-
ment, Jews emigrating
from the Soviet Union
continued to be just a
trickle during the last six
months while repression
of activists and discrimi-
nation of Jews continued
to increase in the USSR,
according to a State De-
partment report.
"The repression of Jewish
activists have paralleled
the repression of other dis-
senters," it was noted in the
13th semi-annual report by
the president of the Com-
mission on Security and
Cooperation in Europe on
the implementation of the
Helsinki Final Act.
The report, which covers
the period from June 1 to
November 30, was submit-
ted by Secretary of State
George Shultz to Rep. Dante
Fascell (D-Fla.) chairman of
the commission. It noted
that emigration figures for
Jews, ethnic Germans and
Armenians, the three
groups that have been
allowed to emigrate have
dropped sharply.

"Only 2,207 Jews were
allowed to emigrate in the
first nine months of 1982,"
the report said. "If projected
to the_ end of the year, this
would result in the emigra-
tion of less than 3,000 Jews
in 1982, compared to 51, 300
in 1979, when emigration
from the USSR reached its
zenith."
The report added that
"there are reports from a
number of areas in the
USSR that local offices of
visas and registration
(OVIR) officials have
been telling prospective
emigrants that 'Jewish
emigration is coming to
an end.' Many Soviet
Jews attribute this de-
cline to the deterioration
of East-West relations in
the past several years
and to Soviet fears of a
Jewish 'brain-drain.'
"Soviet Jewish sources
estimate that there still are
more than 300,000 Soviet
Jews who possess the letters
of invitation from Israel
necessary for application to
emigrate."
In addition, the report
noted that "the authorities
have treated Western
tourists who met with dissi-
dents, religious believers or
refusniks with unusually
heavy-handed crudeness
and have denied visas to
others whom they have sus-
pected of intending to do so."
The report also noted the
plight of Anatoly
Shcharansky, who is being
force fed because he went on
a hunger strike in prison to
protest the refusal to allow
him visitors and mail.
Jewish activist Aleksandr
Paritsky recanted on televi-
sion because he was
threatened with an exten-
sion of his term until 1990
despite his heart condition,
the report charged.
Meanwhile, the trial of

refusnik activists Feliks
Kochubievsky began last
week in a court in
Novosibirsk, it was re-
ported by the National
Conference on Soviet
Jewry.

The 52-year-old electrical
engineer, who was arrested
Sept. 12, has'been charged
with "circulation of fabrica-
tions known to be false
which - defame the Soviet
state and social system." He
faces a penalty of up to three
years imprisonment.
Kochubievsky of
Novosibirsk, has been the
target of KGB harassment
since he and his wife Valen-
tina applied for visas to
Isarel in 1978.
He was denied permission
to join his two sons there on
grounds of "regime consid-
erations." His subsequent
efforts to re-establish a
"USSR-Israel Friendship,
Society" exacerbated his al-
ready strained situation.
He was denounced by
the Soviet authorities as a
"counter-revolutionary,"
although at one time he
had been awarded the
Soviet Order of Merit for
Patriotic Work and had
earned his Kandidat of
Technical Sciences de-
gree.
In another development,
the National Conference
reported that Ida Milgrom,
the mother of prisoner of
conscience Anatoly
Shcharansky, has been hos-
pitalized in Moscow as a re-
sult of extreme emotional
stress.
It also was learned that
former prisoner of con-
science Ida Nudel, who was
refused her right to return
to her home in Moscow upon
completion of her sentence
of Siberian banishment and
had wandered from city to
city, has finally received
permission to settle near
Kishinev, the capital of the
Moldavian republic, accord-
ing to the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry (SSSJ) and
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews (UCSJ).
The two groups also re-
ported that two hunger
strikers have ended their
fasts, each after 40 days, but
without receiving exit
visas.
They are Moscow re-
fusnik International
Grand Master Boris
Gulko, the Soviet Union's
former national chess
champion, and Kharkov
activist Yuri Tar-
nopolsky. Gulko's chess
colleague and former
Moscow champion, Dr.
Anatoly Volovich, con-
tinues his hunger strike
for emigration.
Meanwhile, Jewish cul-
tural activist Boris Cher-
nobilsky has been permit-
ted to return to his home in
Moscow after completing a
one-year prison term.

.

In New York, Charlotte
Jacobson, chairman of the
Soviet Jewry Research
Bureau of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, re-
ported that only 137 Israeli
visas were issued to Jews in
November.

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