100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

October 08, 1982 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

12 Friday, October 8, 1982

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

"'ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA
DETROIT DISTRICT

PRESENTS

THE 9TH ANNUAL

BALFOUR CELEBRATION

AN EVENING OF MUSICAL EXCITEMENT.

FEATURING

THE INTERNATIONAL STAR

GEULA GILL

"A Geula Gill performance is more than just a
great evening of song and music . . . It is an event!"

Xtur pork Zfints

WINNER MICHAELS AWARD OF
YOUNG CONCERT ARTISTS

DANIEL PHILLIPS

"A big talent in the Great
Tradition."
. . Washington Post

SUNDAY, NOV. 7, 1982 - 7:30 P.M.
FORD AUDITORIUM

RESERVATIONS: ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA
— DETROIT DISTRICT —
18451 W. 10 MILE ROAD
PHONE: 569-1515

IRVING LAKER
President

DR. LESTER ZEFF
MAX SOSIN
Co-Chairmen

MRS. SIDNEY Z. LEIB
MRS. IRA G. KAUFMAN
MRS. I. WALTER SILVER
Women's Committee Chairpersons

IRVING LAKER
SIDNEY SILVERMAN
DR. JOEL I. HAMBURGER
•LEONARD HERMAN
Mai Silver Scholarship Chairmen

MRS. BERNARD WESTON
MRS. I. WALTER SILVER
(Golden Sponsor Chairpersons)

MRS. HELEN ATLER
MRS. ALAN FELDMAN
Sponsors Chairpersons

SIDNEY BRAND
SHERMAN SHAPIRO
Patrons Chairmen

MRS. RICHARD B. KRAMER
Publicity Chairperson •
-•
MRS. JACK R. GREENBERG
SEYMOUR RABOTNICK
Seating Chairpersons

REUBEN L. KATZ
MRS. JULIUS RING
MRS. BARBARA WEITZMAN
Communications Chairpersons

DR. & MRS. SIDNEY Z. LEIB
Kick Otf Committee Chairpersons

MRS. NORMA T. HUDOSH
Financial Secretary

MRS. BARBARA RABOTNICK
Correspondence

GENERAL CONCERT COMMITTEE*
MR. & MRS. NORMAN ALLAN
MR. & MRS. LEONARD BARUCH
MRS. SANFORD A. BENNETT
MRS. SIDNEY L. BRAND
MR. & MRS. ALBERT BURKE
JULIAN M. COHEN
HYMIE CUTLER
DR. & MRS. JOEL DREYER
DR. ALAN FELDMAN
WALTER L. FIELD
RABBI LEON FRAM
DR. & MRS. ALEX S. FRIEDLAENDER
DR. & MRS. SIDNEY FRIEDLAENDER
MRS. SARAH GORDON
RABBI IRWIN . GRONER
MR. & MRS. JAMES HACK
MRS. JOEL I. HAMBURGER
DR. & MRS. MAXWELL M. HOFFMAN
MR. & MRS. MORRIS M. JACOBS
JUDGE IRA G. KAUFMAN
DR. & MRS. LOUIS L. KAZDAN
MRS. PAULINE B. KLEIN
MRS. IRVING LAKER
DR. SIDNEY Z. LE113
MR. & MRS. EZEKIEL LEIKIN

MRS. SOL LIFSITZ
DR. & MRS. THEODORE MANDELL
DR. & MRS. HAROLD A. MAXMEN
MR. & MRS. MAX NOSANCHUK
MR. & MRS. LOUIS PANUSH
MR. JULIUS RING
MR. & MRS. GERALD M. ROGERS
MR. & MRS. IRVING ROSENBERG .
MRS. SHERMAN SHAPIRO
DR. & MRS. GERALD SHERMAN
MR. & MRS. HERZL B. SHUR
DR. I. WALTER SILVER
MR. & MRS. ALLAN H. SILVERMAN
MR. & MRS. ISADORE SILVERMAN
MRS. SIDNEY SILVERMAN
MR. & MRS. CARMI SLOMOVITZ
MR. & MRS. PHILIP SLOMOVITZ
DRS. SION & ELAINE SOLEYMANI
MRS. ESTHER SPERBER
HON. MICHAEL L. STACEY
DRS. LEON & DIANA WARSHAY
DR. BERNARD WESTON
MR. & MRS. DANIEL WOHL
*COMMITTEE IN
FORMATION

Thoughts on a Super
PAC and OPEC Oil

By MORRIS AMITAY

WASHINGTON — A
relatively new word in the
American political vob-
abulary is PAC — Political
Action Committee. There
are 3,000 of them in opera-
tion today and they will be
contributing more than
$100 million to Congres-
sional candidates for this
year's elections in Novem-
ber.
About half of the PACs
are corporate-sponsored
and the rest are related to
trade associations or are de-
scribed as "ideological." The
advantage of a PAC is that a
large number of like-
minded people can pool
their resources to make a
more significant contribu-
tion than one individual.
With campaign budgets
reaching new highs, (there
will be a large number of
$500,000 or more House
races) and with the $1,000
personal limitation on indi-
viduals, the allowable PAC
contribution of $5,000 per
election is much sought
after by candidates. So-
called "independent action"
PACs can spend unlimited
amounts to influence elec-
tions — as long as they are
not directly connected to
campaigns — and they are
spending record amounts.
Not, surprisingly, in
communities around the
country, PACs with a
Jewish orientation have
sprung up — particularly
in the past two years.
They serve as a focal
point for politically
active Jews to support
candidates who are sen-
sitive to the concerns of
the American Jewish
community.
Until now, these PACs
have been relatively small
and represent only a frac-
tion of the total support
American Jews contribute
to Congressional candi-
dates. As such, these PACs
perform an important role
because of their knowledge
and familiarity with local
races and personalities.
Due to their noncontrov-
ersial nature and low-key
efforts, they attract scant
attention. However, there is
now an attempt to create a
large nationwide PAC. So
far, most of its efforts have
been in seeking publicity
and a national fund-raising
base, with relatively little
support going to deserving
candidates.
This is a mistake. What
American Jews don't need is
a high-profile target for de-

tractors who will seize upon
this as another example of
"Jewish" influence on the
Congress. Think of the ex-
pectations that will be
raised — and unfulfilled by
such an organiza-
tion.
Almost every mem-
ber of Congress con-
siders himself or herself a
friend of the Jewish
community and of Israel.
Who will make judg-
ments for this Super-PAC
in the "book of political
life?"
In dealing with candi-
dates on issues, it is usually
more effective to operate in
terms. of individual rela-
tionships and personal con-
tact — rather than a large
centralized body. You can
get your message across
more forcefully and have
more impact in a face-to-
face setting.
The political strength of
the American Jewish com-
munity lies in its geo-
graphic distribution and
strong cohesive community
ties. One large New York-
based PAC cannot substi-
tute for scores of smaller
groups working to accom-
plish the same goals.

The large amounts. of
money being contributed
not to promote a single large
PAC would be better -spent
in direct support for deserv-
ing candidates running
Nov. 2. Surely the new Con-
gress will play a vital role in
shaping our nation's foreign
policy in the Middle East
during the next two years.
So with elections less than a
month away — this is the
last chance to give help to
candidates who support
your views.
* * *
According to a recent
news release by the
American Petroleum In-
stitute, "barring a major
foreign catastrophe such
as a severe conflict in the
Middle East, the next
energy crisis should not
happen." But it warns,
"There is no guarantee
that the next crisis will
not happen."
This warning under-
scores the fact that the
United States has not
achieved energy security
and that we must not be-
come complacent. But pro-
gress has been made in les-
sening our nation's depen-
dence on Arab OPEC oil as
the following figures illus-
trate:

Imports to U.S.
(Millions of Barrels Per Day)
June, 1982
1976
Arab OPEC
0.78
2.8
Other OPEC
1.28
3.3
Non-OPEC
3.15
1.2
TOTAL
5.21
7.3
Unfortunately,
our for the PLO.
NATO allies and Japan do.
depend much more on Arab
The United States' in-
OPEC oil than ourselves. creasing independence will
This helps explain their continue only if production
foreign policy stances on the domestically, and in non-
Middle East, including sup- OPEC countries, is
port and diplomatic status encouraged.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan