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October 01, 1982 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

18

Friday, October 1, 1982

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Search for His Jewish Past
Detailed by Author-Journalist

JO °

Paul Cowan is a reporter
who goes to the roots of the
themes he has dealt with in
news coverage as well as a
novelist. He proves his skill
in the mastery of the ,ex-
periences he describes in

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"An Orphan in History"
(Doubleday).
The subtitle of this book,
"Retrieving a Jewish Le-
gacy," is justified by the
deep study he has made of
Jewish historical events.
As a child, Cowan was
ignorant of his Jewish
background. His father
had broken ties with
Orthodox
Paul's
and
grandfather
changed the family name.
The family did not ob-
serve any of the tradi-
tional holidays.
"An Orphan in History"
represents the culmination
of Cowan's search for his
Jewish past. It is a combina-
tion of family history, auto-
biography and a statement
about Jewish authenticity
in the 1980s.

Use dispatch — Re-
member that the world only
took six days for its crea-
tion.

MEET THE
CANDIDATES

MONDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1982
at 7:30 p.m.

CONGREGATION SHAAREY ZEDEK
27375 Bell Road — Southfield

U.S. SENATE

Democrats

Republicans

Senator Donald W. Riegle, Jr.

Philip E. Ruppe

17th CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

Sander Levin ,

Jerry Rosen

18th CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

Allen J. Sipher

Congressman William S. Broomfield
will not attend due to prior
commitment

The Candidates have been requested to address the following

issues:
* PRESIDENT REAGAN'S MIDDLE EAST PLAN
* ECONOMIC AND MILITARY ASSISTANCE TO ISRAEL
* ARMS SALES TO ARAB COUNTRIES -
* BUDGET PRIORITIES AS THEY AFFECT THE ELDERLY
AND SPECIAL NEED GROUPS

SPONSORING ORGANIZATIONS:

B'nai B'rith Metropolitan Detroit Council
Congregation Shaarey Zedek
Greater Detroit Chapter of Hadassah
Zionist Organization of America-Detroit District

Boris Smolar's

Between You
. . . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA

(Copyright 1982, JTA, Inc.)
-
COMMUNITY MOODS: Is there a split developing
within American Jewry with regard to Israel's present
policy and tactics in Lebanon? Is there such a rift develop-
ing also in connection with President Reagan's announced
proposals on Israel-Arab issues?
Elements in this country not friendly to Israel are
seeking to spread an impression that there is a basic divi-
sion of views in the American Jewish community. How-
ever, this was refuted at parallel conferences of the two
most important central bodies of the Jewish communities
— the Council of Jewish Federations and the National
Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council.
Speakers at closed sessions of both conferences, reflect-
ing the moods in their communities, critically evaluated
some of Reagan's proposals. Criticism was also voiced of
Premier Menahem Begin for the sharp tone he used in his
letter of reply to Reagan. The consensus was, however, that
there is no rift in the communities on issues of importance
to Israel and that organized American Jewry is basically
backing Israel.
It was recognized that the Jewish community in this
country is not monolithic, being based on voluntarism and
pluralism. But it was emphasized that a consensus reached
is not automatic, and is arrived at by thoughtful and judici-
ous internal consideration of the issues. "Such delibera-
tions should not be perceived as representing a divided
community," the NJCRAC stressed in a consensus report.
It urged that this should be interpreted to the Jewish com-
munity and to those who report on Jewish opinion. It of-
fered to assist the communities in their interpretive efforts
by providing speakers.
REAGAN'S APPROACH QUESTIONED: There
was sympathetic understanding at both conferences —
which were held in New York with Jewish community
leaders from various parts of the country attending — of
President Reagan's purpose in trying to get Jordan and the
Palestinian Arabs to the negotiating table with Israel.
However, concern was expressed about Reagan's approach.
It was pointed out that the the Camp David pact, which
brought Egypt and Israel together, was aimed at develop-
ing a phased process that allows for discussion of more
limited issues at first, and postponed negotiation of issues
that are now intractable to a later time when conditions, as
a result of this process, may be more conducive to the
resolution of such problems. President Reagan has, how-
ever, put on the table in his plan transcending issues which
have polarized the parties. In the opinion of the NJCRAC
experts, a more limited agreement could lead to the suc-
cessful negotiation of a comprehensive peace agreement
within five years.
While Israel has, in fact, said "yes" to the proposal by
Reagan to sit at a negotiating table with Jordan and the
Palestinian Arabs — but not with the participation of the
Palestine Liberation Organization — the rulers of all Arab
countries lost no time saying "no" at their summit confer-
ence in Fez, Morocco. They sharply rejected Reagan's in-
itiative by refusing explicit recognition of Israel; by re-
questing a divided Jerusalem; by insisting that the PLO be
considered the sole Palestinian representative; by requir-
ing the establishment of an independent Palestinian state
on the West Bank and Gaza; and by demanding that Israel
should return to the pre-1967 borders, which President
Reagan considers as vulnerable to Israel's security.
The test of President Reagan's initiative was whether
Jordan and the Palestinian Arabs will come to the negotiat-
ing table without any pre-conditions, as Israel would. By
reaffirming the PLO as the sole Palestinian representative,
the Arab summit in Fez blocked the participation of Jordan
and other Palestinian Arabs in the negotiations. Unlike
the late Egyptian President Anwar Sadat who bravely de-
cided to recognize Israel — and was later assassinated for it
— the King of Jordan is not so brave, especially after the
assassination of Bashir Gemayel, the president-elect of
Lebanon, who was a moderate Christian Arab, inclined to
concluding peace with Israel.

Captive IDF Soldiers Shot

TEL AVIV (JTA) — The
Israel army magazine,
Bamahane, reported in last
week's issue that the three
soldiers who were first re-
ported missing after their
tank was hit in west Beirut
last week, and later de-
clared dead, had been taken
away and shot by uniden-
tified persons.
They had first been be-
lieved to have burned inside

the overturned tank, but a
tank crew survivor, who
was injured, later reported
that they had been alive
when he crawled away for
help. A search party later
found their bodies, shot at
close range, hidden in a cel-
lar.

If the theory is not cor-
rect, the practice cannot be
right.

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