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July 09, 1982 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-07-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

62 Friday, July 9, 1982

U.S. Communists Linking Fights
Against Capitalism, Anti-Semitism

linking it with the Com-
munists on-going attacks on
capitalism:.
"A united struggle
against racism, anti-
Semitism and all forms of
reaction and bigotry are
necessary ingredients of a
victorious all-people's front
against the monopoly
capital-Reagan offensive
against the people.
"It is a challenge to all
Americans . because a
people divided cannot ef-
fectively fight against
budget cuts, tax in-

A U.S. Communist Party
call for action against grow-
ing anti-Semitism and re-
lated racist manifestations
is linked with the Com-
munists' traditional attack
on the U.S. free-enterprise
system.
The Communist call is
written by Gus Hall, long-
time leader of the U.S
Communist Party. In his
Daily World article, "The
Rise of Anti-Semitism,
U.S.A.," released July 1,
Hall emphasizes legislation
countering bigotry, but

STRAIGHT DOWN THE MIDDLE ...

creases, fare hikes, infla-
tion and unemployment.
A people divided cannot
be effective fighters
against the ravages of
Reaganomics. A people
divided and diverted are
not the most effective
fighters against the war
policies of the Reagan
Administration.
"There is, of course, the
necessity of struggle
against the specific acts and
slander of anti-Semitic in-
cidents. The New Jersey,
Arizona, California, Mary-
land, Oregon, Rhode Island
and New York laws are im-

portant weapons against
prejudice, bigotry and ra-
cism.
"However, such laws and
legislation will not, by
themselves, have the de-
sired basic and long range
effects.
"What is needed is a com-
bination of struggles
against specific acts and a
continuing, relentless and
vigilant campaign of con-
stant exposure, constant
education on the roots and
causes of these viruses
inherent in the capitalist
system of exploitation and
oppression . . ."

Teen Is Contest Finalist

-

Tami Joy Lifton, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
Lifton of Southfield, has
been selected to be a state
finalist in the 1982 Miss
United Teenager Pageant
to be held July 22 at Adrian
College.
Miss Lifton, 18, was
graduted from Birmingham
Groves High School and will
attend Michigan State Uni-
versity in the fall.

TAMI LIFTON

Dora Aronsson Dies at 92

Dora Aronsson, who with
her late husband, Maurice
Aronsson, shared a score of
communal interests in the
Jewish community and in
interdenominational
spheres, died July 4 at age
92.
A native Detroiter, Mrs.
Aronsson was a member of
Franklin Hills Country
Club and Cong. Shaarey
Zedek. She was a life
member of Hadassah and
Women's American ORT.
She leaves a son, Herbert;
a daughter, Mrs. Sam (Mar-
gie) Shell; a brother, Max
Abramsohn of Florida; a sis-
ter, Mrs. Sadie Shapiro;

DORA ARONSSON

eight grandchildren and
one great-grandchild.

Leon Blum's Widow Dies

PARIS (JTA) — Mrs.
Jeanne Blum, widow of
Leon Blum, the pre-war
French Socialist leader who
became France's first
Jewish prime minister, died
last week at her country
home at Jouy-en-Jossas.
Mrs. Blum was Leon
Blum's third wife. She ob-
tained authorization from
the Vichy authorities to
marry him while he was
under arrest in Chazeron
following the Nazi defeat of

France.
In 1943, she was allowed
to join him at the Buchen-
wald concentration camp
where Blum was deported.
Mrs. Blum was last seen
in public a year ago when,
following the election vic-
tory of President Francois
Mitterrand's Socialist
Party, the new French
Prime Minister, Pierre
Mauroy, called at her home
to pay tribute to her late
husband.

Hebrew U. Honors Its Fallen Attorney Martin Butzel, 76
Butzel, who for stitute, Detroit Grand
While Maintaining Routine half Martin
a century carried on the Opera Association and was

JERUSALEM — "I ask
you to rise in silent tribute
to the five Hebrew Univer-
sity students who have fal-
len in battle in Operation
Peace for Galilee."
It is with this sentence
that Hebrew University
President Avraham Har-
man has been opening
ceremonies which have
been held at the university
in recent days. These
events, such as inaugura-
tions of chairs or dedi-
caitons of buildings, usually
involve visitors from
abroad, and the university
administration decided to
proceed with them as
planned despite the out-
break of the war.
"Indeed," Harman has as-
serted at these ceremonies,
"we are not departing from
our regular customs in the
wake of the recent events.
We must continue with our
normal pursuits as a uni-
versity, because those who
fell died to defend values
that are worth defending.

THE JEWISH NEWS

Moreover, it is our task at
the university to ensure
that this society, this coun-
try and this people will al-
ways be worth defending."
Studies at the Hebrew
University have pro-
ceeded as scheduled de-
spite the mobilization of
1,000 students. At the
same time, the university
administration decided
shortly after the war
broke out to take all
possible measures to
minimize the difficulties
mobilized students may
encounter in completing
the academic year
Arrangements similar to
those which were in effect
following the Yom Kippur
War have been introduced.
Thus, every mobilized stu-
dent will be able to write his
end-of-year exams at spe-
cial sittings. Full considera-
tion will be given to
mobilized students regard-
ing the submission of term
papers and other compul-
sory material.

TELLS IT LIKE IT IS!



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A student reads the names of Hebrew University
students and faculty who have fallen in battle on the
war memorial at the Givat Ram campus of the univer-
sity.

law practice begun by his
prominent father, Leo M.
Butzel, died July 2 at age
76.
Joining the firm in 1931,
Mr. Butzel specialized in
labor, corporate and civil
law. He was a member of the
boards of Temple Beth El,
Children's Hospital, Detroit
Round Table of the National
Conference of Christians
and Jews, International In-

Two Terrorist
Leaders Shot

TEL AVIV (JTA) — A
military spokesman re-
ported that two terrorist
leaders were killed in fight-
ing on the beach north of
Sidon last week.
The terrorists were iden-
tified as Azmi Zarir, com-
mander of the Abu Yussuf
Al Nager battalion of El
Fatah and his deputy, Jac-
kie Auesti.
Zarir is believed to have
planned and participated in
the terrorist attack on the
Savoy Hotel near the Tel
Aviv beachfront in 1975 and
the coastal road massacre in
March 1978.
He and Auesti escaped
from their command post
in Tyre on the first day of
fighting in Lebanon,
June 6, and had been hid-
ing out and forcing local
villagers to feed them, an
Israeli military spokes-
man said.
He said that since Zarir's
death, many terrorists have
surrendered to Israeli
forces.

Happy is he who performs
a good deed: for he may tip
the scales for himself and
the world.
—Kiddushin 40:2

a past president of the De-
troit Chapter of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee and
a past national vice
president.
He is survived by his wife,
Rosalie; three sons, Leo M.
II, John E. and Albert K.; a
sister, Mrs. Leonard T.
(Sally) Lewis; and five
grandchildren.

Gabriel Moscow

Gabriel Moscow, a retired
attorney, died July 4 at age
66.
A native Detroiter, Mr.
Moscow retired in 1981. He
was graduated from Wayne
State University's law
school in 1950.
He was a member of Per-
fection Lodge of the Masons,
Keidan Lodge of Bnai Brith,
the Michigan and Detroit
Bar Associations and the
Accountants Guild. He
previously was a conferee
with the Internal Revenue
Service.
Mr. Moscow leaves his
wife, Lillian; a son, Ronald
of Mesa, Ariz.; two daugh-
ters, Mrs. Gary (Barbara)
Pesselnick of Canoga Park,
Calif., and Shirley of
Chicago, Ill.; a sister, Mrs.
Hyman (So_phie) Yaker -
Paso, Tex.; and three g.
children.

A. Pollak

Alexander Pollak, owner
and founder of Creations by
Pollak draperies in Far-
mington Hills, died July 5
at age 67.
Born in Czechoslovakia,
Mr. Pollak leaves his wife,
Madge; a son, Dr. Laurence;
a daughter, Mrs. Steven
(Debra) Zimberg; two
brothers, Armin and Hugo,
a sister, Mrs. Theodore
(Elaine) Schoenfeld; and
two grandchildren.

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