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June 11, 1982 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-06-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Playing

Market

TEL AVIV .(ZINS) — The
newspaper Yediot Ahronot
reports that an estimated
one million Israelis are
playing the stock market as
a hedge against inflation.
The stock of a cooking oil
company rose 144 percent in
one month at the beginning
of the year. During the same
month, the U.S. dollar rose
seven percent against the
Israeli shekel. Another lure
for the stock market is that
profits are not taxed in Is-
rael.

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`Adult Education Would Halt
the Crisis in Jewish Learning'

By DR. MARGARET
SILVERMAN EICHNER

(Editor's note: This
statement is excerpted
from a speech made by
Dr. Eichner from the
bima at Cong. Bnai
Moshe in May on the oc-
casion of her daughter's
Bat Mitzva. Dr. Eichner
earned her PhD in
Holocaust studies and
teaches at several institu-
tions in the Detroit area.)
As we assess the results of
our efforts to give our chil
dren an essential and mean-
ingful Jewish education, we
cannot avoid being greatly
troubled. It is obvious that
Jewish teachers, rabbis,
and parents, as well as
Jewish children, are not
happy with the net
achievement of all of their
effort, energy, time, and
funds expended in the pur-
suit of this essential goal.
If we are not to develop a
growing sense of futility
and dismay (and, too often,
heartbreak) we must exam-
ine the difference between
those limiting aspects
inherent in the situation,
and those aspects which are
inherent in ourselves. That
is to say, on the one hand,
the lack of continuity and,
on the other, the lack of
Jewish atmosphere.
We become suddenly
aware that the years
which we spent in the
teaching of our children
are then followed by the
years of forgetting dur-
ing their youth and
adulthood. This happens
because there is precious
little in their environ-

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ment which stimulates
them to return to learn-
ing. Why should Jewish
youth continue to learn
when we clearly send
them two messages?
• Once you have had
your Bar/Bat Mitzva you
have completed your Jewish
education and
• Since I, as your parent,
no longer continue to learn,
learning is not important,
i.e. the role-model is absent.
Evidently there is no
point in blaming teachers
and schools; we cannot ex-
pect them to do the impossi-
ble for they are only as good
as we demand them to be.
This lack of continuity
and atmosphere can be
overcome only by imple-
menting our conviction
that Jewish education,
again, must become an
open-ended, life-long
process.
It is highly questionable
whether the fundamental
aspects of Judaism — God,
Israel, and Torah — can be
taught in the classroom to
children in such a manner
that will make them sig-
nificant to the individuals
as they grow into adulthood.
Much of the difficulty in
our curricula is due to the
attempt to teach our chil-
dren these sophisticated
ideas and doctrines in terms
outside of their childhood
experience. In trying this
almost impossible task we
bore and bewilder them and
cause them to look back
from adulthood upon this
sort of forced teaching as
meaningless and vague.
However, because we
envision this childhood
school experience as the
only Jewish education they
will receive, we attempt to
impact only their minds and
not their hearts. We teach
basic facts but fail to chal-
lenge their spirit.
At present we tend to
visit the sins of the par-
ents upon the children:
Because the adults do not
continue Jewish learning
we force on our children
a remedial adult Jewish
curriculum.
According to the rabbinic
scholars, the biblical verse,
"They shall go from
strength to strength" refers
to those "who go from the
synagogue to the house of
study — the bet hamid-
rash."
It is very significant to
note that the bet hamidrash
came into being before the
bet hasefer (the primary
school for children under
the age of 13), indicating
clearly, as Prof. Louis
Ginzberg has stated, that
"in olden times the opinion
prevailed that the fathers
were to be educated first
and then the children, not in
the reverse order."
The bet hamidrash left an
indelible impression on the
mind and heart of the Jew,
and its method and process
of adult Jewish education
has helped to perpetuate the
Jewish people to the present
day.
Let us • revive this

effective and ven-
erated institution. Let
us study together in one
centralized dwelling,
one, utilizing collective,
community funding. Let
us demand minimal and
unified standards and
excellence in our
teachers.
Above all, let us com-
municate to our children
that the least we demand of
them is not too much for us
to demand of ourselves.

NCYI to Hear
Dine, Cranston

NEW YORK — Senator
Alan Cranston (D-Calif.),
who led the fight in the Se-
nate against the AWACS
arms sale to Saudi Arabia,
and Thomas A. Dine, the
executive director of
AIPAC, will lead separate
sessions dealing with the
problems that Israel faces in
the Middle East and the
U.S. at the convention of the
National Council of Young
Israel, Thursday through
June 20 at the Homowack
Hotel in the Catskills.

Friday, June 11, 1982

TAU Degrees
to NY Students

TEL AVIV — The second
graduating class of the New
York State Program of Tel
Aviv University's Sackler
School of Medicine recently
received their medical de-
grees.
The 33 graduates also
passed the E.C.F.M.G.
(Educational Commissions
for Foreign Medical
Graduates) examination,
required for medical stu-
dents graduating from out-
side the United States to
practice in America.

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