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May 21, 1982 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

WITH
TREES

JEWISH

NATIONAL FUND

27308 SOUTHFIELD
SFLD, MI. 48076
557-6644

Monday thru Thursday,
9 AM to 5 PM
Friday 9 AM to 4 PM

Wallenberg
Tribute Planned

(Continued from Page 1)
Fifth Avenue Synagogue
in New York and profes-
sor of Jewish studies at
City University of New
York. He had also been
president of the New
York Bodid of Rabbis
and of the Rabbinical
Council of America.
Dr. Rackman was
awarded the AJCommit-
tee's third annual Akibah
Award at the meeting. The
award, named for Akibah
Ben-Joseph, a First Cen-
tury Jewish scholar, is
given each year for a major
contribution to Jewish life.
Anti-Semitism continues
to be a major problem for the
American Jewish commu-
nity, according to a group of
AJCommittee experts.
While overt anti-Semitism
has been placed beyond the
pale of decent conduct, there
is no basis for compla-
cency, they noted.
In addition, a major factor
in igniting the flame of
anti-Semitism is the con-
tinual efforts in the United

FT. COLLINS, Colo.
(JTA) — A statewide series
of lectures slated in August
and September will pay
tribute to Raoul Wallen-
berg, a young Swedish dip-
lomat credited with rescu-
ing thousands of Hunga-
rians during World War II.
Dr. Carl Levine, Colorado
State University emeritus
professor of English, will
conduct the series through a
Colorado Humanities Pro-
gram grant. The project is
sponsored by KCSU-FM,
the public radio station at
CSU.
The city council has pro-
claimed Aug. 4 "Wallenberg
Day."

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
An Israeli Druze, restricted
to his village, lost an appeal
to the Supreme Court when
it refused to order the ban
lifted so that he could travel

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IIIIIIII

5

Orthodox Scholar Calls for Jewish Unity

Nations to "delegitimize Is-
rael."
Hyman Bookbinder,
reflecting the concerns of
his position as AJCom-
mittee's representative in
Washington, asserted
that "although the fight
against crude, vulgar,
explicit anti-Semitism in
America has been essen-
tially won, the fight
against the more subtle,
insidious allegations
against American Jews
and their goals has only
begun."
He cautioned that "when
Jewish advocacy of a public
policy cannot be refuted by
facts or logic, as in the
AWACS debate last year,
Jewish motives will be im-
pugned and the ugly charge
of dual loyalty will be
raised."
Nevertheless, he de-
clared, "We must reject the
advice of those who ask us to
desist from public debate or
advocacy on controversial
subjects lest that lead to
anti-Semitism. To do so is to

Israel Bars Druze Testimony
at UN Human Rights Unit

KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL

Friday, May 21, 1982

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to Geneva to testify_before
the United Nations Human
Rights Commission on the
condition of Arabs in occu7
pied territories.
Salman Natour, a Druze
author, was ordered con-
fined to his village of
Daliyat Al Carmel, near
Haifa, for a period of six
months. The administrative
restriction, issued 10 days
ago, was signed by the mili-
tary commander of the
northern region. Natour is
secretary of the Committee
of Solidarity With the "Arab
People of the Golan."
During the 40-day Israeli
army blockade of Druze vil-
lages on the Golan Heights,
lifted late last month,
Natour transmitted infor-
mation from the four vil-
lages involved in contra-
vention of military orders.
He is also a member of
the Hadash Communist
Party and of the ,Druze
Initiative Committee
which actively opposes
the drafting of Israeli
Druze into the armed
forces.
The court gave no reason
for rejecting Natour's ap-
peal but issued an order giv-
ing the military authorities
11 days to show cause why
the restriction on Natour
should not be lifted.
In a related development,
Attorney General Yitzhak
Zamir administered an ob-
lique rebuke to the army
and police by implying that
the 40-day blockade im-
posed on four Druze villages
on the Golan Heights ear-
lier this year was an exces-
sive measure to impel the
Druze to accept Israeli iden-
tity cards.
Zamir is investigating
charges made by former
Supreme Court Justice
Haim Cohen's Association
for Civil Rights in Israel
that the army violated the
civil rights of the Golan
Druze.

lose the battle against
anti-Semitism even before
we begin.
"Rather, with confidence,
we must show how the
Jewish interest and the
American interest are not
in conflict."
Meanwhile, a West
German expert said open
and aggressive ex-
pressions of anti-
Semitism do not exist in
today's West Germany
but there are signs and
indications of both old
and new anti-Jewish feel-
ings among the Germans,
partly disguised as anti-
Zionism.
Dr.
Dietrich
Goldschmidt, a director of
the Max Planck Institute
for Education and Human
Development in West Be-
rlin, said that "the Anti-
Zionist position in West
Germany was taken both by
rightwing radicals and
leftwing political activists
supporting the Arab cause
in general and the PLO in
particular."
Moshe Arens, Israel's
Ambassador to the U.S.,
called for increased U.S. aid

to Israel in view of the "eco-
nomic burden" that Israel
has assumed as a result of
its final withdrawal from
Sinai.
Arens said the with-
drawal cost Israel about $21
billion. "So far, the U.S.
government did not assume
its fair share of this eco-
nomic burden taken by Is-
rael," the envoy said. He
added that the U.S. has an
"obligation" to share Is-
rael's burden in view of the
role it played in achieving
the peace between Israel
and Egypt.
Arens said that Israel's
greatest concession in
signing the Camp David
agreement was not re-
turning Sinai to Egypt
but the agreement to
grant an autonomy to the
Palestinians in Judea,
Samaria and the Gaza
District.
"Although I do not believe
that autonomy for the
Palestinians would lead to
the establishment of a
Palestinian state, the risk is
there," Arens declared. "We
took the risk for the sake of
peace," he said.

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