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February 05, 1982 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

24

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, February 5, 1982

The pleasure of your company
is respectfully requested at the

CHAT (18th)
Anniversary Dinner

of

AK1VA HEBREW DAY SCHOOL

Sunday, March 7th, 1982

Congregation Shaarey Zedek

27375 Bell Road
Southfield, Michigan

Dinner 7 P.M.

Cocktails 6 P.M.

Couvert $150.00 per couple

For reservations call 552 9690

-

Please Join Us As We Honor
the 18 Year Commitment of
Max, Frieda & Phillip Stollman

to Akiva Through the
Dedication of Our School

"THE STOLLMAN
EDUCATION CENTER"



' ...NONSWF

Concern Raised. Over Proposed
Changes in Information Act

By ROBEERT SEGAL

A Seven Arts Feature

mid-December,
In
President Reagan's job
rating, as reflected in the
Harris Survey, turned
negative for the first time
since he took office. In
mid-December also, an in-
creasing number of con-
cerned citizens started to
realize that some of the
President's proposals for
watering down the Freedom
of Information Act would
set up new roadblocks to
citizen rights to obtain gov-
ernment facts not now
bottled up by bureaucrats.
These two developments
are not unrelated. In his
zeal to get the government
off our backs, Reagan some-
times seems not to realize
that, by certain aspects of
his insistence on federal
change, his Administration
may be piling up loads
heavier than our backs can
bear.
If you have kept tabs on
the rents in tlae Regan
safety net for human
services, if you have toted
up the long list of protests
on the g wernment's
handling- of environ-
mental problems, its in-
sensitivity to the prob-
lems of mass transit and
other urban matter, its
end-runs around social
security, its determina-
tion to downgrade civil
rights gains, you may by
now have swum into the
mainstream of current
opinion.
Certainly, Washington
has not only the right, but
the obligation to keep the
nation secure against belli-
cose governments, spies,
hoods and terrorists. Cer-
tainly, the trials we have
endured in two World Wars,
the Korean War, and the
Vietnam War have proved
the necessity to keep our
guard up.
Arthur Schlesinger pro-
vides insights helpful in siz-
ing up the danger of hobbl-
ing access to some govern-
ment information we seek.
He warns against the rise of
a religion of secrecy in
Washington. He reminds us
of Madison's dictum: "A
people who mean to be their
own governors must arm
themselves with the power
which knowledge gives."

Volume Features
South African
Jewish Writers

IRVING NUSBAUM

General Chairman

Fiction and poetry' from
13 South African Jewish
writers is offered in "South
African Jewish Voices," the
second volume in Micah
Publications' Echad Series.
The selections cover the
country's racial problem
and the poverty that is bred
with it. The images are
vivid, particularly in the
poems, which reveal the
geography, sights and the
sounds of South Africa.
Among the 44 piepes are
works by Lionel Abrahams,
Nadine Gordirner, Bernard
Levinson and Helen Segal.

This leads us into consid-
eration of the Senate
judiciary subcommittee's
recommendations for mod-
ification of the Freedom of
Information Act, instituted
in 1966, modified in 1974,
and now the subject of
rigorous re-examination.
Paced by Sen. Orrin G.
Hatch of Utah, members of
the subcommittee have
tried to meet the demands of
FBI Director William H.
Webster to make it possible
fOr informers continue to
co-operate with govern-
ment.
But the request for
total immunity for in-
telligence agencies is
cause for anxiety. And if
CIA Director William J.
Casey has his way, all of
our intelligence agencies,
probing in both domestic
and foreign fields, will
gain total exclusion from
the act.
There are proposals also
to limit Freedom of Infor-
mation Act inquiries to one
a year. People operating the
bureau complain about the

mountains of work re-
quired; people seeking in-
formation are critical of the
long wait before informa-
tion is obtained.
Many media people
raised serious questions in
the course of the judiciary
subcommittee's hearings.
They pointed out that the
government should not be
allowed to clam up on mat
ters not really vital to nr
tional security.
The religion of secrecy
must not take precedence
over the First Amendment.
The sage who pointed out
that democracy has been
made possible because of
man's propensity toward
evil has passed from _ this
earthly scene; but his spirit
had every right to haunt the
hearing room.

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