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January 29, 1982 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1982-01-29

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▪ •

THE JEWISH NEWS 1Usps2755201

AfterApri / 267* ,„ What?

Incorporating The Detroit Jewish Chronicle commencing with the issue of July 20, 1951

Copyright © The Jewish News Publishing Co.

Member of American Association of English-Jewish Newspapers, National Editorial Association and
National Newspaper Association and its Capital Club.
Published every Friday by The Jewish News Publishing Co., 17515 W. Nine Mile, Suite 865, Southfield, Mich. 48075
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jewish News, 17515 W. Nine Mile, Suite 865, Southfield, Mich. 48075
Second-Class Postage Paid at Southfield, Michigan and Additional Mailing Offices. Subscription $15 a year.

PHILIP SLOMOVITZ

CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ
Business Manager

Editor and Publisher

ALAN HITSKY
News Editor

HEIDI PRESS
Associate News Editor

DREW LIEBERWITZ
Advertising Manager

Sabbath Scriptural Selections

This Sabbath, the sixth day of Shevat, 5742, the following scriptural selections will be read in our synagogues:
Pentateuchal portion, Exodus 10:1-13:16. Prophetical portion, Jeremiah 46:13-28.

Candlelighting, Friday, Jan. 29, 5:24 p.m.

VOL. LXXX, No. 22

Page Four

Friday, January 29, 1982

DEADENED HUMANISM

Two decades of indifference in the United Na-
tions Security Council's treatment of Israel may
have been halted for the present. The failure of
Israel's enemies to secure a supporting vote for
sanctions against the Jewish state is an
encouragement that perhaps there will be an
awakening to the facts on the issues that had
created venomous enmities with a dominance in
the Security Council.
The issue was over the Golan Heights. In an
earlier resolution, even Israel's best friend, the
United States, voted a reprimand with a threat
of sanctions. The latter did not materialize.
Nevertheless, the Golan remains a vital issue
based on misunderstandings. The Likud-.
dominated Israeli government headed by
Menahem Begin believed this to be the time for
asserting the applicability of the Golan to Is-
rael as a necessity for defending Israel's settle-
ments which were always under threats when
the Golan hills were under Syrian rule. The
fair-minded, responsible statesmen like Dr.
Joseph Sisco spoke of applicability by Israel's
annexation. The root of the evil must be defined,
else there be a running mess of distortions
aimed at assailing Israel.
There is a basic fact: Syria is bent on destroy-
ing Israel. Her chief ally is Yasir Arafat and the
PLO. They do not treat their aims with secrecy.
They have made pacts with the Soviet Union
and the target is Israel. Therefore, the obliga-
tion resting on Israel to go to extremes if neces-
sary for self-protection, for life in defiance of the
threat of death.
President Hafez al-Assad of Syria, in an
interview with the Ray al-Aam newspaper of
Kuwait made remarks which were declared to
be not for publication. Then some of the remarks
were made public in separate column by one of
the interviewers. The Assad remarks that were
intended for secrecy were, in translation from
the Arabic:
"We hope the (Saudi Arabian plans) will be
realized. But Point Seven is the only one that
was accepted by the United States and Israel,
and it is the one that Syria rejects because offi-
cial recognition of Israel is inconceivable. This
is because the Palestinian problem is not the
problem of the Palestinians alone; it is an Arab
problem and, primarily, a Syrian problem. Even
if the PLO were to recognize Israel, we in Syria
would not be able to recognize it."
This quotation is circled in the accompanying
complete Arabic text of the quoted interview. It
is presented here as evidence of the intention to
obliterate Israel. Enemies like Syria do not
limit themselves with reacquisition of lost terri-
tory. They look back to 1948 and would destroy
all of Israel. The tolerant (sic!) often speak of
readiness to permit a Tel Aviv state, thus reve-
aling the intention of creating the worst of
genocidal aims.
The enmities stemming from Damascus are
not limited to the genocidal aimed at Israel.
They include the antagonism to the United
States. The links between Syria and the Krem-
lin are matched by the partnership with Libya,
and the financial support it receives from Saudi
Arabia increases the venom.
This is what Israel must contend with. There-

fore, the realism of the Begin-Likud actions.
Jews especially must understand it in order
that mankind may be guided not to become a
supporter of Genocide.

I

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Bar Mitzva and Synagogue
Topics of New Youth Books

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Publication of children's books is gaining momentum. Jewish
Publication Society's "Ktonton" series by Sadie Rose Weilerstein
continued to thrill young readers and provides information as well as
adventure.
A number of the important publishing 'houses have begun to
include children's books on Jewish topics in their selected book lists.
Holt, Rinehart and Winston is among those who are expanding
the Jewish children's book shelf. So is SBS Publishers of Englewood,
N.J.
From the latter comes a uniquely exciting title, "Let's Go to
Synagogue." In story and accompanying descriptive pictures, much is
accomplished as an inducement to youngsters to attend services —
and especially to know what is transpiring in the process. The reader
will soon begin to ask why the book is reserved for the two-year-old-
and-up. The elder will learn from it.
Gail and David Olivestone, the husband-wife team of authors of
this booklet, did not miss a beat in describing the service in the text,
the full title of which is, "It's Shabat: Let's Go to Synagogue." The
illustrator is Arieh Zeldich. -
The child is led through a total experience — being introduced to
the Siddur, the cantor, the Torah reading, the rabbi's sermon, con-
cluding with the Shabat Shalom. The story leaves its mark, in text
and appropriate illustrations.
"Bar Mitzvah" (Holt, Rinehart and Winston) by Howard Green-
field, illustrations by Elaine Grove, is in similar style. It differs in'one
serious respect. The former is aimed at the very young and the text is
therefore abbreviated. Nevertheless, it and the pictures tell the
synagogue story. In "Bar Mitzvah," the author provides a total por-
trayal of the maturing of the young Jew, his reaching the age of
membership in the Jewish community. It is an essay devoted to a
major theme in Jewish life, providing the spiritual bridge to adult-
hood.
The Greenfield account of reaching the maturity status applies
also to the newly-affirmed ceremonies for girls, the Bat Mitzva.
As Son of the Covenant, which is the meaning of Bar Mitzva, the
young man of 13 enters his elders' ranks in a spirit of solemnity. And
there also is the social spirit, the rejoicing in which the communal
welcome is expressed. It is all outlined by Greenfield, who has an
enviable record as author of a number of books of Jewish applicability,
including the holidays.
The origin of the Bar Mitzva involvement is traced by Greenfield
in scholarly fashion. The age of 13, he indicates, has been assigned in
Midrash and Talmud. It is learned that at the age of 13 Abraham
destroyed his father's idols. At 13, Jacob and Esau, Isaac's twin sons,
the grandsons of Abraham, separated, with Jacob following his father
and Esau setting out to worship idols.
The author points out that more specific mention of the important
change in the young Jew's position in the community is found in the
Talmud. He points out that, "It is written in the Talmud that boys
begin to develop into men following their 13th birthday. Until
time it is the father's responsibility to raise his son; after that, it is‘,..„e
boy himself who must be called to account for his own acts."
In the process, Greenfield also defines Midrash and Talmud, and
while explaining Bar Mitzva and the youth's obligations, the author
has provided an informative account of Jewish obligations and iden-
tifications.
There are elders who, having failed to be inducted communally at
Bar Mitzva age, go through the ceremony later in life.
Thus, in both these volumes, there is emphasis on identification.
They are informative, instructive works, and provide means of as-
suming Jewish roles with dignity and joyfully.

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