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December 25, 1981 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-12-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Boris Smolar's

`Between You
• • . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA

(Copyright 1981, JTA, Inc.)

MEET YOUR LEADER: Martin E. Citrin is the new
president of the Council of Jewish Federations.
Citrin is an unusual kind of a leader. He is bright,
intellectual, sensitive, articulate in a quiet way, has a wide
view on life, a good analytical mind, is not partial and
nothing is too much for him to do for others. He has the
ability to get to the heart of an issue, focus on the essence,
Id bring a rare wisdom of judgment.
The son of a Jewish immig-
rant from Russia himself in-
volved in Jewish activities,
•he was brought up in an at-
mosphere of Jewish ethical,
cultural and spiritual values.
This set the stage for him to
make Jewish interests a
priority in his life. The
Holocaust and the establish-
ment of Israel added new di-
mensions to his Jewish feel-
ings and obligations.
He is a product of the young
leadership of the Jewish Wel-
fare Federation of Detroit
where he resides, and where
he served as president of the
MARTIN CITRIN
Federation. He also served in
other leading positions in the Detroit Jewish community,
taking at the same time a deep interest in national Jewish
activities.
He considers himself an American Jew with a capital
"A" and a capital "J". This does not diminish his dedication
to the interests of the state of Israel. He has four children
and all of them have gone more than once to Israel. He plays
a major role in the governance of the Jewish Agency for
Israel as a member of its Board of Governors and a co-
chairman of its Commission on Jewish Education. He is
also a member of the Agency's Immigration and Absorption
Committee and of the Comptroller Committee.
On the American Jewish national scene he serves on
the board of the United Jewish Appeal, on the executive
committee of the Joint Distribution Committee, on the
board of the United Israel Appeal, and participates in other
national organizations. Prior to his election as president of
the Council of Jewish Federations he was a CJF vice
chairman. He also served as chairman of various CJF
committees, being a member of the CJF board and of the
executive committee.
VIEWS ON JEWISH OBLIGATIONS: Citrin con-
siders his election to the CJF presidency as a milestone in
his life.
His philosophy is that the American Jewish commu-
nity — the most affluent and influential Jewish community
in history, and the freest — has a responsibility to serve the
Jewish community not only in this country and in Israel,
but everywhere; also, that the CJF, as a unique instrument
of the Jewish federations, is big enough to care about all of
Jewish life in this country. To him, the CJF reflects the
single-minded discipline of the federations that all the
things they do are founded on the bedrock of Jewish tradi-
tions and ethical values.
Strengthening Jewish identity and Jewish education
are to him major obligations of the organized American
Jewish communities, as the Federations are. He advocates
higher priority for Jewish education in the federation allo-
cations. He considers Jewish education the best bulwark
against assimilation. He is also strongly against diluting
standards of communal services.
As to Israel, he considers the Jewish state as the

Jewish spiritual fountainhead and a central focus in
Jewish life. At the same time, he believes that Israel needs
the Diaspora. He is of the opinion that it is in the interests
of Israel that Jewish communities in the world should con-
dlikinually be strengthened.

Hanuka Greeting From Reagans

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
President and Mrs. Reagan
sent Hanuka greetings to
Premier and Mrs. Begin.
The message, which
Cabinet secretary Arye
Naor released to the press,
said:
"Nancy and I wish you
and Mrs. Begin a Hanuka
full of joy and happiness.
The light of the Hanuka
candles symbolizes the con-
tinuity of the Jewish people

and its culture, its decision
to be free and its constant
quest for peace.
The United States will
always be Israel's partner in
its efforts to bring the bless-
ing of peace to all the na-
tions of the Middle East.
"We hope for full recovery
from your injury." The lat-
ter referred to Begin's
broken hip for which he was
hospitalized earlier this
month.

Reconstructiomsts
to Issue New
Prayer Book

NEW YORK — A new
comprehensive prayerbook
designed "to meet the
changing needs of the
Jewish people" is being pre-
pared by the Jewish Recon-
structionist Foundation.
The prayerbook will re-
flect contemporary Jewish
thought and feelings in
keeping with the funda-
mental tenet of Reconstruc-
tionism. The use of exclu-
sively masculine terminol-
ogy will be eliminated in
order to reflect the Recon-
structionist commitment to
the full equality of women
in Jewish life.

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Friday, December 25, 1981

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On ALL Drycleaning

22185 Coolidge
at 9 Mile
Oak Park

INN IN

Plant
Trees for all
Occasions

Shevat 5742
January 25 to
February 23, 1982

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23043 Beech -
at 9 Mile
Southfield

Coupon must be presented with order — Expires Jan. 8
— — — — — — - wwwwwwwwwwwww w

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ewish
atonal
and
month

JNF SABBATH SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6
Tu B'SHEVAT, New Year of Trees, FEBRUARY 8

TASKS DURING JNF'S 81st YEAR

To avow full solidarity -with the State of Israel in its period of stress.
To focus attention on 80 years of Jewish National Fund activities in developing
the Land of Israel and securing the future of the State of Israel.
To stress the fact that JNF is a major contributor in improving and maintaining
the quality of Israel's.environment. JNF fights desolation, decay -, waste and
wilderness.
To reclaim more land for outposts in the most vulnerable areas.
To insure a Jewish stronghold in the Galilee, an area vital to the future security
and economic self-sufficiency of the State. The Galilee has only a 30% Jewish
population.
-
To help transform the Negev desert into vital Jewish communities so that
10,000 Israeli inhabitants in the Sinai settlements may be relocated, and their lives
rebuilt, along the new borders with Egypt.
To encourage inscriptions in the Honor Roll of the Jewish People — the
Golden Book in Jerusalem.
To place another thousand JNF Blue Boxes, the symbol of a nation reborn. in
Greater Detroit and Michigan Jewish homes.
To plant more trees in Israel. Israel needs more trees. Trees represent the
rekindled strength and lifeblood of the land.
To remind Jews to remember JNF in their Wills, thus not only linking their
names forever with the land of Israel, but their legacy helps ALL of Israel.

• We have before us a colossal task. The JNF isnow called upon to strengthen existing positions
and to prepare a new wave of land settlements in Negev and in the Galilee so vital for the future
of Israel.

A JNF Box
in every
Jewish home

We also ask you, your children and grandchildren to share in a unique and truly meaningful and
especially significant project — a gift from you to Israel through JNF as it enters its 81st year.

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

27308 Southfield Rd • Southfield, MI 48076 • 557-6644

KEREN KAYEME T H LEISRAEL •

13

All contributions to JNF are tax deductible

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