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November 27, 1981 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

28 Friday, November 21 % 1981

HURTIG WINDOW INTERIORS

24725 COOUDGE wool from Darter Davison Market, Oak Park

Tel: 541-3640

DISCOUNTS ON ALL WINDOW COVERINGS ARE THE
SAME AS ANYWHERE ELSE

Verticals
1" Blinds

Up to

5w° OFr
OFF

Shades

Our Service Is Superior• Deliveries Quick & Efficient

FREE ESTIMATES and DECORATING ADVICE IN HOME

SISTERHOOD OF
CONG. SHAAREY ZEDEK
TOWN HALL SERIES 1981-82

PRESENTS

DR. PAUL PEARSALL

Chief, Problems of Daily
Living Clinic; Sinai Hospital

Speaking On

"STRESS & DISTRESS:
CRISIS & GROWTH"

Morris Adler Hall

Cong. Shaarey Zedek

Wed., Dec. 2, 1981

7:30 P.M.

Admission Charge: $4.00 per person
Tickets available at door!

For Information. Call:

Anita Millman 855-1611
Gail Goodstein 661-4430

Shcharansky Transferred to Chistipol

NEW YORK (JTA) —
Prisoner of conscience
Anatoly Shcharansky has
been sentenced by a labor
camp court to three years of
strict regime in Chistipol
Prison, one of the harshest
such institutions in the
Soviet Gulag, and has al-
ready been transferred
there, his wife Avital told
the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry I SSSJ) and the
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews UCSJ).
Chistipol is some 550
miles east of Moscow.
The internal "trial" took
place upon Shcharansky's
release from 10 months in
solitary confinement in the
Perm labor camp where his
health had deteriorated to a
point where he collapsed
early last summer.
The authorities con-
cealed the trial from his
aged mother in Moscow
for a month until they
notified her a few days
ago, the SSSJ and UCSJ
reported.
Yosef Mendelevich, the
recently released POC who
had been with Shcharansky
in Chistipol before both
were moved to Perm in
1980, told SSSJ and UCSJ
that "for three years
Anatoly will be completely
isolated from the outside
world, with no meetings
with his family, and able to
write only one letter every
two months. His food ration
will be diminished to 1,700

THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE OF TEMPLE BETH EL

Telegraph at 14 Mile

Josephine I. Bloom, chairperson

Presents

The
Rosner
Trio

• KIM ROSNER,DOELKER, Flute
• CINDY ROSNER KELLY, Clarinet
• COLLETTE SALON ROSNER, Piano

Compositions by

-

Julius Chajes, Richard Wagner,
E. Avon, Bohuslav Martini!,
George Gershwin, Andrew Arvin;
J.S. Bach with Prof. Jason Tickton, Organist
TUES. EVE, DEC. 1, 1981 at 8:00

Program sponsored by the program committee of
Temple Beth El and the Jason Tickton Music Fund
No Admission Charge • Everyone Invited • Refreshments 7:30

A tour of the temple and a pipe organ demonstration will follow
the program.

Prof. Jason Tickton will lecture briefly about the works to be
performed and the new Temple Beth El organ ...

calories a day."
Mendelevich said that
Chistipol "houses what the
Soviets call the 'most
dangerous' inmates, those
who demand to be acknowl-
edged es political prisoners.
Every prisoner is compelled
to work the whole day and is
punished if he refuses.
"Perm — only by com-
parison — was better than
Chistipol. There, Anatoly
could meet with his friends,
when he was not in solitary,
and could write letters. Now
he will be punished for
every small infraction of the
regulations, for the regime
in Chistipol is especially se-
vere."
In Washington, Theo-
dore Mann, chairman of
the National Conference
for Soviet Jewry (NCSJ)
said Jews in the Soviet
Union, whose situation
can be called "drastic"
are "being held,hostage"
pending an improvement
of the "cool" relations be-
tween the U.S. and the
USSR.
Mann, at a luncheon with
reporters at the NCSJ office
in Washington, said he ex-
pected the condition of
Soviet Jews, which was de-
scribed as in an "emer-
gency" situation, would get
worse in the next few
months before it, hopefully,
improved in 1982.
He said an improvement
is expected to come about as
a result of the renewal of
U.S.-Soviet trade relations.
Mann stressed that
American foreign policy
cannot be based on its effect
on Soviet Jewry. But he said
President Reagan has as-
sured him that the situation
of Soviet Jews will be dis-
cussed when the U.S. and
the Soviet Union begin
trade talks, probably next
year.
At the same time, Jerry

Goodman, the NCSJ's
executive director,
stressed that the fate of
Soiriet Jewry should not
have to be tied to U.S.-
Soviet relations, noting
that it has not always
been so.
Goodman noted that
there has been almost a 90
percent decrease in emigra-
tion since 1979 when 51,320
Jews left the Soviet Union.
In 1980, the figure was
21,471. Last month, only
368 Jews left .the USSR.
Goodman called this an
"apparent end of emigra-
tion, at least for the time be-
ing."
He said that there can no
longer even be talk of family
reunifications since the
Soiiets have instituted a
policy where only first de-
gree relatives_in Israel
could send affidavits needed
for Soviet Jews to emigrate.
First degree relatives are
now defined as parents,
brothers or sisters. Childreh
and grandparents are ruled

out, he said.
He said that since the
major decline in emigration
visa approvals, many Jews
who would like to emigrate
are now afraid even to apply
for visas.
. At the same time,
Goodman said there is an
assault on Jewish iden-
tification in the Soviet
- Union with the home
study groups being
broken up, participants
jailed and all Judaic
books are being confis-
cated,. He said that
Soviet Jews who study
Jewish culture usually
decide to emigrate be-
cause they realize there is
no future for Jewish life
in the Soviet Union.
In Paris, the Eurdpean
Inter-Parliamentary Con-
ference for Soviet Jewry
wants to send a fact-finding
mission to the Soviet Union
to seek on the spot solutions
likely to facilitate Jewish
emigration from the soviet
Union.


Women's Plea Will Focus
on Soviet Jewish Prisoners

The Women's Plea for
Soviet Jewry, slated for 8
p.m. Dec. 10 at the main
Jewish Community Center,
will focus on Ida Nudel and
Abe Stolar, two Soviet
Jewish prisoners of con-
science.
Stolar was born in
Chicago, Ill., and his par-
ents took him and his sister
back to the -Soviet Union in
the 1930s. His father disap- -
peared and his mother and
sister were arrested, and
sent to Siberia, where they
died.
Stolar married in 1956
gnd the couple have a son,
Michael. In June 1975,_ as
the Stolars were about to
board the plane to leave the

Soviet Union, passport con-
trol confiscated their visas.
In 1976, Mrs. Stolar was
granted citizenship by the
state of Israel. The family
has since been trying to
emigrate.
Miss Nudel, who was
sentenced to a labor
camp in Siberia, has been
tryind to be reunited with
her sister Elena Fridman
in Israel for more than six
years.
Congressman William
Brodhead will address the
program. The public is in-
vited free of charge. Bus
transportation will leave
the Jimmy Prentis Morris
Branch of the Center at 7.
There is no charge.

Israeli Development Town Seeks Einigres

NEW YORK — Garin
Karnei Shomron, a new
religious neighborhood un-
der development in central
Israel, is embarking on a
major effort to attract im-

migrant families from
North America.
' The garin will be one of
three neighborhoods lo-
cated in Karnei ShOmron,
an expanding development

'Noble Prize' for Kishon

PARIS — Israeli writer
Ephraim Kishon has been
awarded the 1981 "Noble
Prize" for humor. The prize
is given by the Association
for the Promotion of Humor
in International Affairs.
The group cited Kishon-
for "brilliantly avoiding
making his name a house-
- hold word" despite the sale
of 10 million copies of his
books in 28 different lan-
guages.
In his acceptance address,
"Is There Such a Thing as
an Israeli Sense of Humor,
and Why Not," Kishon re-
flected on the writer's craft.
"When you have sold half a
million books," he said, "you
are probably of the new left.
When you have sold a mil-
lion, you are probably a lib-
eral. Over a million and you
begin to lose interest in so-
cial justice Slid favor the
right. Above 20 million arid



town established four years
ago in Samaria. Karnei
Shomron is located on the
lifer Saba, - Shehem road,
about 40 minutes from Tel
Aviv.
Nat Rosenwasser, the
neighborhood's founder and
a former New Yorker, be-
lieves some 500 families
will settle in the garin
within three years.
Rosenwasser is currently
visiting North America, in-
terviewing interested
families and community
groups on living pos-
sibilities in .Garin Karnei
Shomron.

Emigre Manual

k

-

EPHRAIM KISHON
you are probably a Com-
munist."
Kishon, who was born in
Hungary but has spent most
of his life in Israel, de-
scribed his., homeland as a
place where "half an hour's
drive in either direction will
take you to the beach or into
captivity."

NEW YORK (JTA) —
The National Council of
Jewish Women has pub-
lished a 140-page manual to
assist federation staff mem-
bers and their constituent
agencies and volunteers in
providingresettlement help
to the continuing inflow of
Russian Jewish settlers, ac-
cording to Shirley Leviton,
NCJW president.

Never argue )vith a fool —
people might not know the
difference.

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