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August 21, 1981 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-08-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

30 Friday, August 21, 1981

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Detroit's Jewish Camping Facilities Encompass A Major Operation

(Continued from Page 29)
lage specialty program
utilize the spacious studio
with its wooden dance floor,
mirrored walls and adjoin-
ing dressing room. One wall
of the studio opens to an
outdoor amphitheater set in
a grove of trees.
Performances for the

entire camp take place in
the Allen Amphitheater.
Under the direction of
performing arts super-
visor Margie Gaines,
nearly 500 campers and
staff presented a Jewish
song and dance festival
at the amphitheater on
July 23. Dancer and

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choreographer Harriet
Berg, one of the camp's
artist-in-residence pro-
fessionals, and her per-
formers will hold a blue
grass-folk festival for the
camp this month.
The THA constructed a
ceramics studio about 11
years ago for teenagers in-
terested in creating their
own pottery. Run at
college-level by professional
staff, the studio has 12
wheels and complete
facilities for producing pots,
dishes and other vessels.
Campers helped build the
kiln, said Zaks.
Another popular building
in the Maas Recreation
Area is the environmental
education center. Young
visitors to the year-round
nature center are invited to
hold the live snakes and ob-
serve specimens of native
flora and fauna.. Zaks said
plans call for installing an
active beehive.
The food preparation cen-
ter, completed in 1977, is a
marvel of efficiency. The
combination kitchen and
storage facility is open six
days a week, from 6 a.m. to 1
a.m. Two shifts of cooks pre-
pare meals for everyone at
Ortonville and also provide
baked goods for Camp
Tamarack at Brighton. The
meals are delivered by
truck to nine residential vil-
lages within the
campgrounds, where coun-
selors and campers eat to-

An evening of fun
for the
City of Hope

GREATER DETROIT CHAPTER

69th Annual Dinner-Dance
Sunday, Sept. 20, 5:30 p.m.

Detroit Plaza Hotel

Main Ballroom

Starring
JACK CARTER
the Comedians' Comedian

Dancing to the Fenby-Carr Orchestra

Free Valet Parking — Black Tie Optional
$125 Minimum Contribution Per Plate

For Information, Call 353-2535 or 863-4649

Enjoy an Evening at Renaissance Center and
Help the City of Hope's Major Fund-Raising Activity

gether in their unit's dining
lodge.
Friedman Auditorium
is the site of perform-
ances and dining
facilities for groups of 200
or more during the non-
summer months. Shabat
services are conducted in
the building's chapel.
Perhaps the most exciting
building project in recent
years for the FAS and THA
is the new Bert and Toba
Smokier Pioneer Skills
Center. When completed,
there will be seven build-
ings re-creating a pioneer
village from yesteryear.
Visitors will see demonstra-
tions of Oldtime crafts and
skills in this year-round
outdoor education center.
Zaks said campers, as-
sisted by a THA employee,
recently erected a tower in
the -village that will be used
for operating a windmill. To
date, the village includes a
toll bridge, woodshop, log
cabin, animal barn and
maple sugar building (the
first batch of maple syrup
was produced in March of
this year). Planned for con-
struction are a smith shop,
summer kitchen and one-
room schoolhouse. A root
cellar on the grounds will
keep carrots, onions and
potatoes fresh year round,
said Zaks.
Burton estimated that
the Jewish community has
a truly major investment in
real estate and-buildings at
the various Tamarack Hills
Authority camping sites.
They are at Brighton, begun
in 1927; Ortoville, 1953;
Kennedy, 1963; and Agree
Outpost (in Ontario), 1969.
THA also oversees primi-
tive campgrounds in Michi-
gan: Mesick Base Camp and
the Mollie M. Burtman
Campgrounds at Mio.
He pointed out that
Federation's capital allo-
cations and grants at
these sites now total
cumulatively close to $2
million and that perhaps
a similar amount has
been contributed over
the years by a large
number of donors for
many of the individual
buildings, villages and
facilities. Camp
Tamarack is noted as the
largest year-round
Jewish camp in the na-
-
fion.
But more important than
these holdings, according to

Israel Lottery
Winner Sought

TEL AVIV (JTA) — The
management of the Payis
Israel national lottery is
waiting for an unknown
person to come to their office
and claim the largest prize
in the history of the lotto's
weekly gamble.
The ticket was correctly
filled in by a Ramat Gan
resident and carry-overs
from previous weeks when
there were no correct
entries brought the prize
money up to 2.4 million
Shekels (about $200,000).
The person paid 35
Shekels (about $3) for his
entry form.

both Zaks and Burton, are
the Jewish lives that are
touched and enriched by
taking part in the programs
offered at the THA
facilities.
Serving on the THA
committee are A. Arnold
Agree, Leonard Borman, N.
Brewster Broder, Leonard
R. Farber, Benjamin H.

Frank, Harvey A. Gordon,
Earl G. Grant, Robert
Kasle, Sol G. Kurtzman,
Milton K. Mahler, Stanley
H. Marx, Allan Nachman,
Dr. Irving Posner, Marvin
Rosenthal, Dr. Peter G.
Shifrin and Sidney J.
Winer.
For information, call the
FAS, 661-0600.

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