100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 31, 1981 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

12 Friday, July 31, 1981

Canada Reform Jewry Doubles in 10 Years

Bloom
qe?-
gloom
Registered Electrologists

By BEN GALLOB

(Copyright 1981. JTA, Inc.)

Come in and let us remove your unwanted
hair problem and improve your appear-
ance.

Ask For Shirtee or Debby.

Appt. Only



358-5493

11 Agile between Evergreen & Southfield

In the tradition of

IRVING'S FURNITURE

Let me
personally
take care
of all your
needs

The number of Reform
Jews in Canada has doubled
in the past decade but such
Jews still account for only
around' eight percent of
Canadian Jewry, far below
their United States coun-
terpart, according to
Maurice Miller, the new
president of the Canadian
Council of Liberal Congre-
gations, the Canadian
region of the Union of
American Hebrew Congre-
gations. ,
Miller also told the Cana-
dian Jewish News that Re-
form affiliation by young
Jews — age 16 to 30 — tri-
pled in the past fouryears.
He said there are now 17 Re-
form congregations in
Canada, representing about
6,600 families or some
23,000 Jews.
In the past decade, 10 Re-
form synagogues have been

many young people left
Quebec. He said one. of
Montreal's three Reform
synagogues,. Temple Beth
Sholom, had to close be-
cause of dwindling mem-
bership.
Miller said there are no
Reform congregations, in
the Atlantic provinces.
However, the Toronto area
has a Reform community of
about 5,000 member
families. The west Canada
congregations, he said, are
young and relatively small,
with an average of 60 to 200
member families each, •
many' of them having reset-

,5icha
IRVING'S
FURNITURE

3065 ORCHARD LAKE ROAD IN KEEGO HARBOR
ACROSS FROM THE KEEGO THEATER • PHONE 681-3900

10 MINUTES FROM MAPLE & TELEGRAPH

OPEN MONDAY. THURSDAY E. FRIDAY FROM 9:30 AM to 8:30-PM
TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY, SATURDAY 9:30 AM to 5:30 PM

CLOSED SUNDAYS JULY & AUGUST -

By LORI GOODMAN

Joint Distribution Committee

AFULA — "Watching a
kibutznik age is like look-
ing through an open win-
dow. His loneliness, is
transparent to says" Eli
Dror, director of the ESHEL
Home for the Aged. "All the
kibutzniks can sense his iso-
lation and anxiety."
In the early 1970s con-
cerned members of kibut-
zim and moshavim in the
Jordan' Valley appealed to
the government to find a
place for their elderly who
had no families to look after
them or who were too physi-
cally or psychologically ill
to care for themselves.
"Although the kibbutzim

DIAMONDS ALL SIZES & SHAPES
AT MICHIGAN'S LOWEST PRICES
4ar

UM
SALE

- ends Aug. 8th

SAVE 40-50%

DIAMOND STUD EARRINGS AND PENDANTS

REG.

SALE

$ 125
160
225
325
420
650
1,000
2,000
3,400

$ 59
89
129
199
279
389
649
1,200
1,899

NEW YORK — The
American Jewish Congress
has praised Representative
William Lehman (D-Fla.)
forleading an effort in the

.06
.10
.15
.20
.25
.30
.50
1.00

$

160
220
250
350
450
550
860
2,095

(ST)

CreativeJev\elers

2'4173 Northwcstcril H ∎A ∎ .

Some of the old-timers
are from families who set-
tled this area generations
ago and literally built it up,
says Dror. "About one-third
came from European coun-
tries occupied by the Nazis."
In the two-story build-
ing, four residential
wings, each containing a
dining room and lounge,
house 80 infirm residents,
80 requiring nursing
care, 20 psycho-geriatric
cases, and 25 ambulatory
elderly. The average age
of the residents is 78. A
76-member interdiscipli-
nary staff consisting of
doctors, physical
therapists, occupational
therapists and nurses
look after the needs of the
residents.
In the future, Dror would
like to expand the services
of the home. "We desper-
ately need an additional 30
beds for those who require
more attention than the in-
firm but not as much super-
vision as the nursing
patients," he says.
In addition to its support
of homes for the aged,
ESHEL created and main-
tains a wide variety of
community services in all
parts of the country to en-
able the elderly to remain in
their' homes and com-
munities without being in-,
stitutionalized.

* * *

1 4Kt. Pendants

bti

Daily 10-6
Thurs. 10-8

and moshavim are self-
contained communities,
they could not provide the
companionship or medical
facilities needed by the
aging members of their
group," Dror stresses. And
that, he notes is why they
turned to ESHEL (Associa-
tion for the Planning and
Development of the Aged).
In 1974, the association
established a home in
Afula in cooperation with
the ,UJA-federation sup-
porad American Jewish
Joint Distribution Com-
mittee (JDC) and the Is-
rael Ministries of Health,
Labor and Social Affairs.
The home provides resi-
dential, medical and re-
habilitative services for 205
elderly citizens from Beit
Shean, Afula, Migdal
HaEmek and a dozen rural
municipalities in the Jor-
dan Valley and surrounding
area. The 15 municipalities,
representing a population of
130,000, provide supervi-
sion, para-professional staff
trainingsand financial sup-
port to the residence.
Representatives from the
home, the municipalities,
ESHEL, and the Ministries
of Health, Labor and Social
Affairs have formed an ad-
missions board which re-
views cases presented by
local health and welfare
agencies.

Sc uthticid

,

at 12 Mile Rd.. Franklin Plaza

MI 48034

$

89
119
149
199
249
319
599
1,299

356-2525

Visa
Mastercharge

tied from Montreal and To-
ronto.

Miller also reported there
is a shift to more traditional
observances in some Reform
congregations, attributing
that development to the
strong youth component of
Canadian Reform Judaism.
"There is a growing desire
among some young people
to keep some of the old tra-
dition," he reported. He said
that while prayer texts were
standardized, each _Cana-
dian congregation "can set
its own guidelines on how it
will conduct services."

AJCongress Applauds U.S.
Transfer of Funds friom UN

ESHEL Home for Aged Gives
Elderly Kibutzniks Special Care

Tell me what you're looking for . . . the exact furni-
ture, the name, the specific pieces. Let me see
what I can come up with . . . and how much money
I can save you.

SIZE
(TOTAL WT.)
.06
.10
.15
.25
.33
.50
.75
1.00
1.50

started, most of them in the
Toronto area. Three Reform
congregations on the
prairies — Winnipeg, Cal-
gary and Edmonton — were
established in the past two
years, as was the Baycrest
Terrace Temple in Toronto,
made up of 60 elderly resi-
dents of the Baycrest home.
Miller said other Re-
form synagogues less
than 10 years old are lo-
cated in Vancouver,
Windsor, Kitchener, and
other cities. He said that,
as president, he hoped to
visit every Canadian
community where a Re-
form congregation exists
"to find out how each is
getting along."
Miller said that while On-
tario and western Canada
Reform Judaism has been
growing, Reform member-
ship in Montreal was stag-
nant for several years and
declined after 1976 when

Dollmaking is a favorite activity for these two resi-
dents of the ESHEL Home for the Aged in Afula. The
finished products will be sold at an annual bazaar
held at the home.

House of Representatives to
eliminate a grant of
$500,000 to the United
States Decade for Women
Voluntary Fund and trans-
fer the money to the State
Department's Agency for
International Develop-
ment, where it will be used
for women in developing
countries.
Henry Siegman, execu-
tive director of the Jewish
Congress, wrote to Rep.
Lehman to express "deep
appreciation"'of the Miami
legis'lator's action:
"The UN Decade for
Women has been con-
taminated, since 1975, by
the equation of Zionism
with racism. It was
further compromised
during the 1980 Confer-
ence in Copenhagen with
the unconscionable and
grotesque elevation of
the terrorist Palestine
Liberation Organization.
"We applaud the with-
holding of funds from any
program associated with
the travesty that the UN
decade for Women has be-
come. Such action by our
government is a Clear, effec-
tive way to put the United
Nations on notice that the
American people strongly
object to the exploitation of
the international women's
movement by the PLO and
will not contenance it."

Bar-Ilan Center
Aids Diaspora

RAMAT-GAN — Small
Jewish communities in var-
ious parts of the world are
acquiring some of the prac-
tical knowledge and dedi-
cated personnel essential to
their continued existence
through Bar-Ilan Univer-
sity's Joseph H. Lookstein
Center for Jewish Educa-
tion in the Diaspora.
As- part of this prograni,
the Lookstein Center
(named after the univer-
sity's late chancellor, Rabbi
Joseph H. Lookstein) has
announced an agreement
with the World Sephardic.
Union for Sephardic young
people from abroad to be
trained for future commu-
nity roles through three
years' study scholarship
leading to degrees at Bar-
Ilan.

Money is the fringe bene-
fit of a job you like.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan