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July 10, 1981 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-07-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, July 10, 1981 25

Jewish Agencies Tackling Problems of Unemployment

By ESTHER ALLWEISS
TSCHIRHART

Jewish Welfare Federation

Staff at some of the social
service agencies affiliated
with the Jewish Welfare
Federation have been notic-
ing the effects of unem-
ployment within the Jewish
community.
Margaret Weiner, direc-
tor of professional services
at the Jewish Family Serv-
ice, said, "Jews generally
are not working on the line.
More likely they are profes-
sionals, middle manage-
ment, entrepreneurs. But
six, eight or 10 months after
the initial horrendous jin-
pact of massive layoffs, our
community feels it. It's like
shocks from an earthquake.
We'll get the second wave."
"People in the sctap steel
business, for example, are
being secondarily affected
by auto industry layoffs.
They've had to reduce their
sights. Small businessmen
are just not doing as much
business because their
clients aren't working," said
Samuel Lerner, executive
director of the Jewish Fam-
ily Service.
Lerner noted that
Jewish dentists and doc-
tors have been affected
by auto industry layoffs
as well. "The insurance
that industrial employees
carry on the job is lost
when their jobs are lost.
The people sometimes
can't afford to get medi-
cal and dental care on
their own so it hurts the
Jewish doctor and de-
ntist," he said.
Albert Ascher, execu-
tive director of the
Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice and Community
Workshop, said his
agency began noticing an
increase in Jewish un-
employment around
January 1980. It promp-
ted a backload of cases
for the agency, which is
designed to help people
find and keep suitable
employment.

"There is structural un-
employment in the auto in-
dustry — it will never be
what it once was," said
Ascher. "And once there is
structural unemployment
within an industry, the
non-Jewish unemployed
will be competing with Jews
for jobs in related or other
fields. So Jews are affected
by auto layoffs even if they
are not being directly laid
off on the assembly line," he
said.
He noted that affirmative
action policies in city and
state government can also
limit Jewish opportunities,
and some Jews employed in
the government sector have
been affected by layoffs.
In recent months, the
Jewish Vocational Serv-
ice has been assisting
new groups of unem-
ployed workers. Ascher
said many formerly
non-working wives are
looking for jobs to sup-
plement the principal
breadwinner's income.
"In addition, there has
been an alarming increase
in the breakup of the Jewish
family. More divorced
women, who no longer can
stay home with their chil-
dren, are having to seek
employment," said Ascher.
Russian Jewish immig-
rants are another group of
people experiencing in-
creased unemployment.
Many of the Russian Jews
have been laid off from the
original jobs JVS found for
them when they came here.
The jobs held by the non-
English speaking immig-
rants — factory work, light
assembly, labor — are di-
rectly affected by the de-
pressed economic climate in
Detroit, said 'Ascher.
Underemployment,
where an employee takes a
salary cut or demotion
rather than lose his job, also
is a problem for many in the
Jewish community, accord-
ing to Mrs. Weiner.
Ascher said other
workers are working
fewer hours than they

.

U.S.-PLO Contacts Revealed

LOS ANGELES — Dis-
cussions with the PLO on is-
sues ranging from the
safety of American dip-
lomats to the chances for
Middle East Peace have
been conducted by U.S. offi-
cials, despite official policy
prohibiting negotiations
with the terrorist organiza-
tion.
The Los Angeles Times
revealed this information it
had gained from sources in
- Washington and Lebanon.
(kw, According to the L.A.
Times, the discussions were
held with the PLO under
Presidents Nixon, Ford,
Carter and Reagan.

In its story datelined
Washington, the Times
said Henry" Kissinger,
secretary of state under
Presidents Nixon and
Ford, began the clades-
tine talks in 1974. It
added that the Carter
Administration made
two attempts to bring the
PLO into peace talks with

Israel, carrying on exten-
sive indirect talks with
PLO chief Yasir Arafat.
The Times also stated
that despite Reagan's de-
scription of the PLO as a
"gang of thugs," his ad-
ministration quietly con-
tinued low-level contacts
with the PLO through the
CIA and the U.S. Embassy
in Beirut.
The Times report also
said the CIA and the PLO
have exchanged informa-
tion.

Aliza Begin
Is Hospitalized

JERUSALEM — Mrs.
Aliza Begin, the premier's
wife, was reported in stable
condition Wednesday eve-
ning after being admitted to
a hospital Tuesday night
suffering with a bronchial
infection. Hospital sources
said she would have to
undergo tests and would be
in the Hadassah Medical
Center for about a week.

plentiful.
area will use the money for seling or finding a job.
For information on the
In some cases, JFS staff
"community outreach and
short term intervention will discuss with the client unemployment outreach
crisis counseling," said the possibility of relocation program, contact Esther
to another state where jobs Krystal at Jewish Family
Lerner.
in his specialty may be more Service, 559-1500.
With the hiring of social
worker Esther Krystal, who
began her duties with the
JFS outreach program on
June 18, Lerner said the
Fine China & Fine Stemware
agency has begun actively
seeking the unemployed,
In Stock
the underemployed and the
working poor in the Jewish
community.
"There may be people
out there who are having
on
an emotional crisis re-
Social worker Esther lated to their unemploy-
5-pc. Place
Krystal interviews a ment. We would like to
Settings
client as part of the new counsel and talk to them
Jewish Fanity Service
• Service Pieces
during this period of
outreach program for stress. We urge these
• Fine
unemployed workers people to call us for an
Stemware
and their families.
appointment," said
Patterns
* * *
Lerner.
Persons taking part in the
would prefer, or they are
employed in a position outreach program will be
assisted according to their
that doesn't fully utilize
particular circumstances,
their educational back-
said Lerner. For example,
BRIDAL REGISTRY
ground and past work
While supply lasts.
someone whose unemploy-
experience.
ment
benefits
have
run
out
Indivithib.ls and families
will learn which public
31205
have been turning to the
agencies can be of assis-
Jewish community agencies
Orchard
Lake Rd.
tance with financial aid,
for help in resolving prob-
138
HUNTERS
and whether or not Jewish
lems related to unemploy-
Family Service can provide
W. University
SQUARE
ment.
"We've had an increase in emergency assistance.
Farmington
Dr.
Lerner said JFS will refer
the number of persons
Rochester
Hills
unemployed clients to the
applying for our post-high
Jewish Vocational Service
school scholarships," said
if their specific problem is 1 ,05-5222
Barbara Nurenberg, assis-
tant exeuctive director at obtaining vocational coun-
the Jewish Vocational
Service. "Part of the in-
crease has to do with more
parents being unemployed,
and their children aren't
•ALL WATCHES 30-50% OFF
always able to find summer
jobs to earn money for col-
•ALL DIAMONDS 25-50% OFF
lege."
Mrs. Weiner said existing
•CROSS AND PARKER PEN SETS
problems within the family
25% OFF
unit (such as handling
teen-agers or marital diffi-
•ALL 14K-18K GOLD CHAINS _
culties) may intensify when
NOW $18.90 12.90 PER GRAM
there is an unemployed
breadwinner or when the
• ALL GIFTWARE 25% OFF
inflation squeeze forces a re-
luctant housewife to enter
•ALL CLOCKS 25% OFF
the job market. More and
more unemployed persons
VISA'
have been seeking counsel-
ing at the Jewish Family
OPEN THUR. EVE. 'TIL 9 P.M.
647-1470
Satisfaction
Service because they've lost
4085 W. MAPLE at TELEGRAPH
Guaranteed
layaways invited
the insurance formerly

BIRMINGHAM
available on the job that
would have enabled them to
obtain private psychiatric
services, said Mrs. Weiner.
Hard economic times,
particularly for working
divorced women with
children and for Russian
Jewish immigrants, have
put increased demands
upon the Hebrew Free
Loan Association, ac-
cording to executive sec-
retary Florence
Schwartz. She said some
persons are finding it dif-
AL STEINBERG
ficult to repay the
interest-free loans.
"We may have to call
people more and keep after
them. Still, we're not ex-
periencing any real
traumatic problems; the
majority are paying," she
said.
The United Foundation
has allocated $180,000 to
the United Community
Services of Metropolitan
29300 TELEGRAPH
Detroit. The Jewish Family
JUST
NORTH OF TEL-TWELVE MALL
Service and six other family
services in the tri-county

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