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April 03, 1981 - Image 57

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Students Gain Understanding of the Aged,
Judaism in Program at Prentis Manor

The warmth between
them is genuine.
Dora Stone, a resident of
the Jewish Home for Aged
— Prentis Manor, is sitting
in the day lounge, holding
hands with her teen-age vis-
itor Suzanne Claypool.
It's a joyful reunion for
the two, since Susie has
been unable to visit Mrs.
Stone for a few weeks.
"I've missed her," Mrs.
Stone said happily. "She
kissed me once and she
kissed me twice." And,
just to make it three,
Susie reached over to
giver her friend another
peck on the cheek.
Susie and eight of her fel-
low students at Southfield
High School each have a
special person to visit every
other Wednesday afternoon
as participants in the
Southfield Student Pro-
gram at Prentis Manor.
(Jewish Home for Aged is a
member agency of the
Jewish Welfare Federation.
Funding for the agency is
made possible in part
through contributions to
the Allied Jewish
Campaign-Israel Emer-
gency Fund.)
Now in its second year of
operation, the Southfield
Student Program provides
an opportunity for teen-
agers and older people to get
to know each other within a
structured setting. The stu-
dents also learn about aging t.
and problems of the elderly
through educational ses-
sions arranged by Prentis
Activities Director Sheri
Traison.
Southfield High School
teacher Joan Cowell helped
initiate the student pro-
gram through her involve-
ment with the city of South-
field's Parent-Youth Guid-
ance Commission, an organ-
ization that promotes
human understanding and
community involvement.
She recruits students
by talking to classes and
getting referrals from
other teachers. This
year's participants, in
addition to Susie, are
Carol Dailey, Claire

Reps. Aid Soviet Jew

WASHINGTON — Three
Michigan Congressmen are
among 58 who have joined a
campaign sponsored by
Bnai Brith to aid Abe Sto-
lar, an American citizen
who has . been refused per-
mission to emigrate from
the Soviet Union.
The three from Michigan
are Reps. William
Brodhead, James Blan-
chard and Howard Wolpe.
Meanwhile, the Russian
Immigrants Association in
Israel hopes to send a dele-
gation to Moscow shortly to
persuade the Soviet
authorities to increase the
number of exit visas being
granted and to allow direct
flights from Moscow to Is-
rael. They want to reduce
the number of dropouts
staying in Europe and going
elsewhere rather than to Is-

• HORIZONTALS
• VERTICALS
• WOVEN WOODS

rael.

Only 80 immigrants ar-
rived in Israel from the
Soviet Union last month,
while 85 percent of those
leaving the Soviet Union
stayed in Vienna await-
ing passage elsewhere.

It was announced in New
York that Vladimir Kislik,
a long-time refusenik from
Kiev, has been charged with
"malicious hooliganism." If
convicted, he could face a
maximum term of five
years' imprisonment.
Kislik, arrested March 19
as he was leaving a Purim
party and accused of al-
legedly "attacking a
woman," is being held in
Kiev's Lukyanovka Prison.
It is expected that the trial
will be held in about two
weeks.

customs.
"The students are look-
ing forward to joining the
Passover Seder at Pre-
ntis this year," said Ms.
Traison, adding that they
enjoy arranging get-
togethers with the resi-
dents without it being a
holiday occasion. Re-
cently, she said, the
teen-agers made a party
for the residents, bring-
ing in kosher food and
"everybody played
Pokeno."
The last 45 minutes of the
afternoon is for each stu-
dent to visit with his or her-
assigned resident. Ms.
Traison pairs up the teams.
The residents are selected
on the basis of several fac-
tors, mainly their interest
in participating in the pro-
gram. Over time, as the
teen-ager and resident get
to know each other, a spe-
cial relationship may de-
velop.
Ms. Traison gave the stu-
dents a sheet outlining
possible topics of conversa-
tion at the time she made
the pairing assignments.
She suggested asking the
residents about growing up
in their native lands (if an
immigrant), the first street
they lived on in Detroit,
their celebration of Shabat

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In top photograph, Prentis Manor resident Hilda
Gach gets a helping hand from her regular visitor,
Angela Hall. In the bottom photograph, Jacob Dunn,
also a resident of Prentis Manor, gestures to make his
point while conversing with visiting students Bob
Michael, seated, and Tom Hafey.





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and holidays and even how
they washed their clothes
years ago. However, the
students agreed that the
favorite topic of conversa-
tion is often the activities of
the residents' children and
grandchildren.
The Southfield Student
Program, according to Ms.
Traison, has taught the stu-
dents to be more under-
standing of old people and
better acquainted with the
Jewish culture. She said a
few of the students have
indicated an interest in be-
coming a health care profes-
sional as a result of their
experiences.
Charles S. Wolfe is the
executive director of the
Jewish Home for Aged, and
Cheryl Riskin is the ad-
ministrator of Prentis
Manor._

Garmo, Tom Hafey,
Angela Hall, Michelle
Lynn,
Alison
McDonough,
Bob
Michael and Laurie
Schultz.
The students assemble in
a meeting room at Prentis
during the first half hour of
their visit. Here, they view
films or hear speakers dis-
cuss such topics as the his-
tory of the Jewish Home- for
Aged, the background of the
elderly residents and activi-
ties for the institutionalized
aged. Occupational and
physical therapists are
among the health care pro-
fessionals who have talked
about careers in their field.
An interesting aspect to
the group is that only one of
the students Is Jewish. So
part of the educational
process that goes on is in
teaching the teen-agers
about • Jewish religion and

Friday, April 3, 1981

933-1490

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