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March 27, 1981 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

W. German Anti-Semitism Strong

BONN (JTA1— A public
opinion poll showing that
anti-Semitism is still strong
in West Germany has been
confirmed by security serv-
ices which reported that
anti-Semitic incidents have
increased alarmingly in the
country over the past year.
According to a public
opinion poll conducted by
sociologist Badi Panahi, 50
percent of those surveyed
have negative feelings
about Jews and one-third
have very strong anti-
Semitic prejudices.
Just before this poll was
published in Stern maga-
zine, a government survey
published last week in Der
Spiegal news magazine
showed that 18 percent of
West German voters believe
"Germany had it better
under Hitler."
The poll published in
Stern said that 27 percent
of West Germans believe
some races are predis-
posed to be more im-
moral than others"; 14
percent believe "you
have to keep in mind that
Jews exercise a damag-
ing influence on Western
Christian culture"; 56
percent did not share this
view; 16 percent rejected
it "moderately," and 10.5
percent rejected it
"weakly."
According to Stern, de-
spite the disclosure of Nazi
murders and the telecasting
of such films as the
"Holocaust," anti-Jewish
prejudices have still not
died out.
Meanwhile, security
agencies reported 42 inci-
dents of vandalism against
Jewish cemeteries, monu-
ments and synagogues in
1980 compared to 35 in
1979.
There were 44 cases in
which Jewish activists were
threatened or plots were
uncovered to murder
Jewish leaders. Most of
these developments were
concentrated in recent
months.
In the Cologne suburb
of Deutz, 30 Jewish
gravestones were de-
stroyed and others
daubed with slogans
such as "Adolf (Hitler)
Lives." In the old Jewish
cemetery in Aschafen-

burg, 87 gravestones
were desecrated last No-
vember and partially de-
stroyed.
In August 1980, 152
gravestones were over-
turned and damaged in the
same cemetery and similar
crimes were committed in
more recent months in
Worms and Bad Hersfeld.
Large-scale damage to
Jewish gravestones were
reported from Frankfurt,
the city with the second
largest Jewish community
in West Germany.
Swastikas and Nazi slogans
were daubed on the stones.
A monument at the site of
the old synagogue in
Frankfurt and another
Jewish site in a public park
were defaced with anti-
Semitic slogans. Police re-
ported evidence of close
cooperation between Ger-
man and non-German ex-
tremist groups, the latter
notably Palestinians sup-
porting the Palestinian
Liberation Organization.
Security services were
increasingly concerned
with new evidence of
contacts between neo-
Nazis in West Germany
and El Fatah, the ter-

rorist arm of the PLO.
Many members of the
outla wed
"W.ehrsportgruppe
Hoffman," a neo-Nazi
paramilitary organiza-
tion masquarading as a
sports club, have re-
ceived training at PLO
camps in Lebanon.
The leader of the group,
Karl-Heinz Hoffman, vis-
ited Beirut several times in
recent months and was
hosted there by the PLO.
The government is reported
to be playing down these
facts for fear of harming its
relations with the Arab
countries.
Reacting to this wave of
anti-Semitic incidents and
to the government survey
which showed that 18 per-
cent of West Germans feel
that life was better under
Hitler, Heinz Galinski,
chairman of West Berlin's
Jewish community, urged
new laws to combat neo-
Nazism and rightwing ex-
tremism.
He noted in a radio inter-
view that his past warnings
about a rightwing revival
had been dismissed as
exaggerated.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, March 27, 1981

Youth Concert in Birmingham

A youth concert featuring
the "Movin' Theatre," a
dance troupe from Wayne
State University, will be
presented at the Birming-
ham Temple 1:30 p.m. Sun-
day by the Vivace Commit-
tee.

Tickets are available by
calling Evelyn Kreger,
544-8350, and at the door.

HARVEY URNOVITZ'S

Luncheon will be served by
the youth group of the tem-
ple at 12:30. There is a
charge.

It

Your Hosts:
Jack Baiter 1111
and
Al Winkler

HUNGARIAN
VILLAGE

APRIL 1 & 2, 7 p.m.

11 MUSICIANS
SINGERS
DANCERS

'12

CHICKEN PAPRIKASH or
VEAL PAPRIKASH or
STUFFED CABBAGE
TICKETS IN ADVANCE

843-5611

I-15 (Fisher) at SPRINGWELLS EXIT
All Credit Cards

5€9-1548

The New

P ICKLE

SARRE!.

DINNER SPECIALS

GOOD FROM MARCH 27 THRU APRIL 3

TUES. . .LIVER & ONIONS
$3.95
WED. . .MEAT LOAF
$3.95
THURS. .VIENNA SKIRT STEAK $4.95

ALL DINNERS INCLUDE: CUP OF SOUP, SALAD,
VEG., POT. & BREAD BASKET

CARRY-OUT SPECIALS

per pers.

Includes Dinner
Choice of 3 Entrees

SNEAKY TREATS

MTh Smithfield

12 MILE & EVERGREEN, Southfield
IN THE EVERGREEN PLAZA

Presents It's Annual

GYPSY
CONCERT

THE BEST LITTLE
DIET BAKERY IN
THE WHOLE WORLD

GOOD FROM MARCH 27 THRU APRIL 3

HOT PASTRAMI
NOVA LOX
WHOLE CHEESE CAKE

$ 499 lb.

$ 8 95 lb.

$795

HOURS: Mon. 11-3, Tues. thru Thurs. 11-9, Fri. 11-12, Sat. 10-12, Sun. 10-9

OUR ANTIPASTO SALAD IS SECOND TO NONE!

Exhibit on Earliest Colonial
Jews to Tour United States

qnTr r , i
an

CHILDREN'S NIGHTCLUB
WASHINGTON — After
The exhibit concentrates
setting attendance records on the families of the 23
during a three-month dis- original Jewish settlers in
play at the Daughters of New York and on early
American Revolution Jewish immigrants who
Museum in Washington, settled in other major met-
Etc.
D.C., the exhibition, "The ropolitan areas. Through
Dinner At 6 P.M.
Jewish Community in paintings, decorative art ob-
(Children's Dinners all $2.65)
Early America, 1654-1830," jects and documents, the
11005 Middlebelt at Plymouth
Show At 7 P.M.
which deals with the part Jewish communities in
All Adults Must Be Accompanied
American Jews played in Newport, New York,
Wonderland
Shopping
Center
Livonia
By Children 12 and Under
building colonial society, Philadelphia, Baltimore,
has been chosen as a high- Richmond, Norfolk, Savan-
522-5880
light of the Spoleto Festival, nah and Charleston are re-
U.S.A., in Charleston, S.C., presented.
May 22 to June 7. On June
Stern winter loves a
12, the exhibit will open at
INCLUDE HOME-MADE BREADSTICKS, ANTIPASTO SALAD & SPUMONI
Temple Beth-Or, Montgom- dirge-like sound.
40anonmeemumemommnamommimmomoniennennimenemonnmsomniminennmesommenmanemmimmomosionmennwormim
ery, Ala.
Ilt
Following its appearance

in Charleston and
Montgomery, the exhibition
is expected to be on view in
about a dozen American
cities, it was announced by
Rabbi Malcolm Stern,
chairman of the Exhibits
Committee of the American
Jewish Historical Society.

Honoring Mozart in Europe

PUPPET SHOW

DINNERS FROM $4 15

Vet0 it „
Wqffings

SATURDAY,
MARCH 28TH
AT 1:30 P.M.
We'll Give You
The Shirt
Off Our Back!

The first 6,000 Youngsters (14 and under)

attending the Wings

Shown at the recent Mozart Week festivities in
Salzburg, Austria are from left, Salzburg Lord Mayor
Josef Reschen; Richard Spaengler, president of the
International Foundation Mozarteum; and Marguer-
ite Kozenn Chajes, of the Detroit and Vienna Mozart
societies. The photograph was taken by Klaus
Hennch —.Zurich., -

FRI. & SAT.

vs Edmonton Oilers
game at 1:30 p.m., will receive a T-Shirt
compliments of Little Caesars
and the Detroit Red Wings.

%ma aro no me an Is ow mu MI

1

FREE

1

T-SHIRT DAY

memmeame emm am au ewe am mum en no um mon mom= one mem sem mom an ws ow ma au mu me war seer moor= imai we

4/



-I



37

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