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March 20, 1981 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

20 Friday, March 20, 198

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS



Caricatures

for your party

By

SAM FIELD

Call

3994320

Israelis Killed
Dismantling TNT

TEL AVIV (JTA) — An
Israeli officer and soldier
were killed while dismantl-
ing mines and explosive
charges in south Lebanon,
an army spokesman re-
ported.
He said the Israelis were
asked by Maj. Saad Had-
dad's Christian militia to
help remove the explosives
after a militiaman was
wounded earlier in the-day.

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not quite a brute.

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LAWRENCE M. ALLAN
President

GEMOLOGIST DIAMONTOLOGIST

Call to Conscience' Issued
at Annual AJC Meeting

NEW YORK (JTA) —
The American Jewish Con-
gress, in a sweeping state-
ment of principles and go-
als, has issued a "Call to
Conscience" that rejects
"both the politics of selfish-
ness and the politics of de-
spair" and urges a "fellow-
ship of commitment and ac-
tion" for a "world based on
justice and the rule of law."
The statement, issued at
the AJCongress' annual
meeting here, welcomed the
debate in which "Americans
are engaged in a profound
rethinking of many long
held policies and the very
purpose of government."
On the domestic scene,
the statement affirmed that
"government must continue
to be an active force for
enhancing social justice and
human dignity." On that
score it decried the growth
of "moral vigilantes whose
political agenda consists of
a dangerous imposition of
government control, in the
name of religion, over the
classrooms, free speech and
women's right of choice."
In foreign affairs, the
AJCongress statement
expressed "gratification"

Give Your Windows the Works

with the Administra-
tion's "announced inten-
tion to act decisively
against terrorism, both
domestic and interna-
tional," but rejected "the
suggestion that somehow
the campaign against
terrorism must be at the
expense of the campaign
for human rights."
The statement reaffired
"our commitment to the
survival and prosperity of
Israel," and called on the
Administration to "oppose
the reject" efforts to under-
mine the Camp David peace
process.
Al Friedman of Michigan
was a delegate to the meet- .
ings.

Israeli Cow
Sets Record

TEL AVIV (JTA) —
"Zabda," Kibutz Hefetz
Haim's prize cow, has set a
new Israel — and probably
world — record by increas-
ing her record daily milk
output of 50 kilos to 62
kilos (136 pounds) of milk
on a good day.
The Israel Dairy Associa-
tion was recently told that
Israel holds the world's re-
cord for average milk prod-
uction per cow with an av-
erage of 8,092 kilos of milk
each in 1980. Kibutz Hefetz
Haim holds the Israeli re-
cord, with an average of
9.658 kilos for each of its
315 milch cows.
Zabda last year produced
14,000 kilos. The kibutz
farmers say their success —
and that of their cows — is
due to the care they take
with the special diet they
provide.

Israel Featured
at Egyptian Fair

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JERUSALEM (JNI) —
Israel will participate for
the first time in Egypt's an-
nual industrial fair, to be
held in Cairo next week.
One of the attractions of
the fair will be an Israel
day, in which the Israeli
pavillion will be featured.
About 90 Israeli producers
of industrial, agricultural
and processed food products
will exhibit. Industry,
Trade and Tourism Minis-
ter Gideon Patt will attend
the fair on Israel Day, by in-
vitation of Egypt's deputy
prime minister.

Fire Kills 3

TEL AVIV (JTA) —
Three people died and four
were injured last week in a
fire which autted a shoe fac-
tory on the fourth floor of
workshop building in the
center of Haifa. Survivors
said a "massive blaze" broke
out without warning and
the dead workers were
trapped under the ceiling
which had collapsed.
Firemen said that about
300 people had been in the
building on Herzl Street at
the time. They were
evacuated safely while
firemen confined the blaze
to the fourth floor.

Jerusalem Scene of Clash
of Police, Ultra-Orthodox

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
About 15,000 ultra-
Orthodox Jews attacked
police on the Ramot Road
Saturday afternoon in a
continuation of distur-
bances that have plagued
the area on several success-
ive weekends.
Saturday's demonstra-
tion was led by Rabbi Yit-
zhak Weiss, chief rabbi of
the Eda Haredit, the um-
brella organization of the
ultra-Orthodox in the Mea
Shearim quarter. While
foreign and local television
crews filmed the disorders,
the demonstrators launched
sporadic assaults on the
ranks of mounted and foot
policemen, chanting "Shab-
bes, Shabbes." The police
drove them back with water
cannons.
The demonstrations are
to protest vehicular traffic
' on the Sabbath along the
Ramot Road where it passes
through the religious quar-
ter. Disturbances have oc-
curred regularly since the
road was opened in 1978
linking Jerusalem with the
northern suburb of Ramot.
In recent weeks how-
ever, they have become
confrontations between
religious zealots and the
police rather than with
Sabbath violators.
Some observers here link
the latest Ramot Road dis-
turbances to the visit of the
Belzer Rebbe, Yisochur Dov
Rokeach, to the U.S. where
his life was allegedly
threatened by members of
the rival Satmar Hasidic
sect. The Eda Haredit and
the Neturei Karta in
Jerusalem are closely iden-

tified with the Satmar
Hasidim.
In Nevi, York, the entire
block on Second Avenue in
midtown Manhattan where
the Consulate of Israel ,is lo-
cated was a sea of black hats
and long black coats last
week as some 4,000 ultra-
Orthodox Jews, mostly
members of the late Satmar
thia
from
Hasidim
Williamsburg section
Brooklyn, demonstrate!'
against the government of
Israel and demanded the re-
lease of ultra-Othodox Jews
arrested during violent
in
demonstrations
Jerusalem the previous
weekend.
The demonstration was
an unroarious denunciation
of Israel and Zionism. Many
of the Hasidim wore yellow
stars on their arms, symbol
of ignominy imposed on
Jews by the Nazis. Others
were dressed in prison uni-
forms and hundreds wore
sacks over their traditional
black garb, the Jewish sym-
bol of mourning.

About a block away,
some 200 ultra-Orthodox
women staged a demon-
stration of their own,
separate from the men
according to their tradi-
tion.
Previously, about 400
Satmar Hasidim milled
outside the building de-
nouncing Israel as _"Nazi"
and protesting a "pogrom"
by the Israeli police against
their people in Israel. The
Hasidim claim that 42
ultra-Orthodox Jews were
arrested and are still con-
fined in Jerusalem.

Thatcher Allows Ministers
to Meet Arafat, PLO Chiefs

LONDON (JTA) — Prime
Minister Margaret
Thatcher has publicly given
her fellow ministers carte
blanche to hold talks with
Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yasir
Arafat or with other PLO
representatives.
Mrs. Thatchees state-
ment, virtually confirming
that a British-PLO meeting
is inevitable, will trigger
strong protests by the
Jewish community. Gre-
ville Janner, MP, president
of the Board of Deputies of
British Jews, has called a
meeting of the communal
leadership to consider her
statement.
The Israeli Embassy has
commented angrily on the
disclosure that Benjamin
Strachan, the British Am-
bassador to Lebanon, had a
20-minute meeting with
Arafat in Beirut last week.
The Embassy accused
British diplomats of "con-
sorting with assassins."
Israel is already at
loggerheads with Britain
over her leadership of the
so-called European in-
itiative on the Middle
East. Despite wide-
spread public distrust of
the PLO, the most - inf-
luential British news-
papers, such as The

Times, The Guardian and
The Financial Times,
support the- European
call for involving the PLO
in Middle East peace

negotiations.

But they also recognize
that Israel's Labor Party
seems as strongly opposed
to PLO participation as is
the present Israeli govern-
ment.
Meanwhile, the London
PLO representative, Nabil
Ramlawi, has announce''
that he plans to open a PIA
office in Dublin, capital of
the Irish Republic.

Pro-Arab Group
Aims at Blacks

WASHINGTON — The
Palestine Congress of North
America held a policy
roundtable on "Domestic
Implications of the Mideast
Crisis and U.S. Policy" ear-
lier this month.
The pro-Arab group,
primarily aimed at black
legislative aides, was
endorsed by Walter Faun-
troy, the non-voting District
of Columbia delegate to
Congress. The roundtable,
which was closed to the
press, concentrated on rifts
between Israel, the Jews
and American blacks, ac-
cording to a story in the
Near East Report.

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