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February 20, 1981 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

28

Friday, February 20, 1981

THE DETROJI ,JEWISH,NET.

Righteous
Gentile Honored

DON'T BUY
A
CONDOMINIUM
UNTIL
YOU TALK
TO MARTY .. .

(See Page 55)

N

JERUSALEM — One of
the 12 Jews he hid from the
Nazis planted a tree in the
Avenue of the Righteous
Gentiles recently for Stanis-
law Sobczak.
Sobczak was present at
the ceremonies. He hid the
Jews in his attic and then in
his barn from November
1942 until August 1944 in
Nazi-occupied Poland.

Shaarit Haplaytah

SURVIVORS OF 1945
is pleaSed to announce a

Testimonial Dinner Dance

Catered by Kosher Jewel Catering
mikw ‘Km

Honoring

ABRAHAM
WEBERMAN

President of Shaarit Haplaytah
1974-1919

Saturday Night
February 28
8:00 P.M.
Temple Emanuel

14450 West 10 Mile Road, Oak Park, Michigan

Dancing Music By
Eric Rosenow and his Continentals
The Public is Invited
For Reservations Call

Mrs. Esther Halpern
353-9237
Simon Schwarzberg
557-1141

Mrs. Sol Kleinman
356-3383
Gedali Elbaum
548-7339
Ann Fisk
545-1244

Harry Praw
968-1686
Lola Pines
358-0715

Detroit Jewish Life in '20s Recalled by Local Historian

By ALLEN A. WARSEN

Not only were Jewish
students discriminated
against in Russian univer-
sities and gymnasia, but
they also were discrimi-
nated against in American
universities and high
schools.
Thus in 1898, as recorded
in "The Michigan Jewish
Year Book of 1925," Jewish
students at the Detroit Cen-
tral High School (now
Wayne State University)
were "denied membership
in the only debating organ-
ization existing in the
school at that time."
As a result, the Jewish
students organized a debat-
ing team that gradually
evolved into the Detroit
Jewish Philomatic Debat-
ing Club that was still via-
ble 27 years later.
The team's charter
members were Myer Co-
hen, Spencer S.
Fishbaine, Ira Frieden-
berg, Jacob Gordon, Saul
Hartz, Nathan Levin,
Saul Meister, Benjamin
Salzstein and Louis Wine.
The Young People's
Society of Temple Beth El
founded at the beginning of
this century as a social
organization also included
in its program philanthropy
and debating.
Its members, who
attended the various state
colleges and universities,
once a year got together as
guests of the temple and
celebrated their annual
most important event, the
so called Students' Day.
In 1925, the society's offi-
cers were: Foster Vehon,

THE DETROIT ZIONIST FEDERATION

and the

MIDRASHA COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES

under the sponsorship of DOR HEMSHECH
World Zionist Organization Young Leadership
ZIONIST INSTITUTE

HISTORY OF Zionism

with Betty Roth

Eight Monday evening meetings aimed at providing es-
sential background material in Zionism geared espe-
cially to young leadership.

Betty Roth is a PhD candidate in American Studies at
University of Michigan. She has worked as an assistant
to the noted historian, Dr. Jehuda Reinharz, and has
lectured widely on topics of Jewish interest.

MONDAY, MARCH 9

MONDAY, MAY 4

(omitting April 27, Pesach)

7:30 PM-9:30 PM, Room 16

MIDRASHA COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES

21550 W. TWELVE MILE ROAD, SOUTHFIELD, MI 48076
COURSE FEE: $15.00 (includes books and materials)

For advance registration, Call 352 7117

-

president; Jean Miller, vice
president; Elizabeth
Lieberman, secretary; and
Helen Langer, treasurer.
Young Israel of Detroit
was founded by Sabbath
observing young people.
Established in 1925, 75
years after the founding
of the Orthodox Congre-
gation Beth El, the prin-
cipal objective of Young
Israel was to create a
Jewish social and cul-
tural environment in ac-
cordance with Jewish
tradition and religious
precepts.
The organization's first
officers were: Irving Schlus-
sel, president; Naomi
Buchhalter (Mrs. Floch),
vice president; Anne Miller
(Mrs. Abramsohn), secre-
tary; and Hyman C. Miller,
treasurer.
It is well to note that for a
time the members of Young
Israel conducted their reli-
gious services and cultural
activities at the Kirby Cen-
ter, the Holbrook
Synagogue, and at Temple
Emanu-El at Taylor and
Wilson. Eventually, Young
Israel acquired its own
quarters and became one of
the community's foremost
Orthodox instituions.
The Maimonides Medical
Society founded in 1912 by
Drs. A.E. Bernstein, N.E.
Arnstam, J.B. Baruch,
Joseph Beisman, W.W.
Kahn and Joseph Shellfish
was aimed at the social and
scientific betterment of the
Jewish medical profession.
Its name was proposed
by the Hebrew scholar,
Dr. Baruch, in honor of
the great Jewish
philosopher and physi-
cian, Moshe Ben Maimon,
better known by the ac-
ronym Rambam (1135-
1204).
The
society's
first
president was Bernstein.
Some of the others were:

PLO Caught

JERUSALEM (JTA) — A
terrorist cell in the
Jerusalem area has been
uncovered by security
forces. An army spokesman
said the seven members of
the cell, linked to El Fatah,
have confessed to acts of
murder, sabotage and ar-
son.
Security forces who ar-
rested the suspects found a
hand grenade, a pistol, de-
tonators, chemicals used to
prepare explosives and a
radio.
Among the terrorist acts
confessed by the suspects
were the murder of an Is-
raeli soldier, Avrahani
Deutsch, near the Rockefel-
ler Museum three years
ago; the murder of Moshe
Yoskovitch, a resident of
Bnei Brak, near
Gethsemane two years ago;
and a hand grenade attack
on the Dolphin Restaurant
in East Jerusalem early this
year.
They are also suspected of
two other murders, arms
thefts and setting fire to
cars.

Israel will have 4.7 mil-
lion Jews by the year 2000,
and 1.2 million non-Jews.

Drs. Aronstam, M.E. Silver,
B. Friedlander, Louis Klein
and S. E. Barnett.
The benefits the society
brought to its members in-
cluded, inter alia, "the pro-
motion of good will and
friendship; the elimination
of strenuous rivalry and the
development of special
abilities in the members by
giving them encourage-
ment and support, and the
furthering of the ability to
write and discuss scientific
papers."
No wonder the society
had grown from six mem-
bers in 1912 to 100 in 1925.
Unique among the
community's organiza-
tions was the "Detroit
Jewish Open Forum."
Founded in 1924 for the
purpose of bringing to
Detroit Jewish scholars
and literati, its member-
ship was composed of
almost the entire local
Jewish intelligentsia.
Since these people played
important roles in com-
munal affairs, they should
be remembered and their
names recorded. They were:
Milton M. Alexander,
Shifra Bachrach, Joseph
Bernstein, Harry J. Brevis,
David A. Brown, Fred M.
Butzel, Mary Caplan, Isaac
Finkelstein, Rabbi Leon
Fram, Bernard Isaacs, Leon
B. Kay, A.J. Koffman,
Maurice Krause, Aaron
Kurland, Sara Landman,
Emanuel Paperno, David
W. Simons, Dora Tennen-
baund, Morris D. Waldman,
Samuel Weinberg and
Maurice H. Zackheim.
The Forum speakers too
were individuals of the
highest caliber. They in-
cluded Judge Jacob Panken
of New York, founder and

NEW HOURS

first president of the Ameri-
can ORT; Alexander M.
Dushkin, superintendent of
the Chicago Board of Jewish
Education; and Rabbi
Lewis Browne of Newark,
N.J., author of "Stranger
than Fiction."
"The Detroit Jewish
Workers Culture League"
was founded in 1923 for the
purpose of promoting Yid-
dish literature and–culture.
Following its estab-
lishment, the league or-
ganized literary and
dramatic clubs, a library
and choir.
The league conducted its
activities in the Jewish In-
stitute Building, High and
Hastings Streets.
The league officers at the
time of organization were
David Levy, secretary; H.
Blank, financial secretary;
I. Finkelstein, A. Victor, G.
Yanovitz, M. Finkel, Levy
and Blank, executive com-
mittee.
The league's guest lec-
turers and performers in-
cluded the poet H. Laiwik;
Peretz Hirshbaine, playw-
right and novelist; Schmiel
Niger, literary critic; E.
Karmer, artist; and mem-
bers of the Detroit Sym-
phony Orchestra.
This article is based on
"The Michigan Jewish Year
Book of 1925," an important
historical document.

WRITE:
The Jewish Idea
P.O. Box 633
Troy, MI 48099

NEW HOURS

Ah in etveter

SELECTED JEWELRY

(A)N1ITETE

11,111 SLR% ICE

13720 W. 9 Mile Rd., Oak Park, Mich.

Near Post Office

LI 7-5068

OPP. , WED. CLOSED SAT.



at Butzel Conference Center

Ortonville, Michigan

PURIM FAMILY WEEKEND

For Families
With Children
.
Up To the Age of Twelve

A Fantastic Experience

• toddler room
• new games
• indoor crafts

• outdoor sports
• scholar- in-residence
• hayride

FRIDAY, MARCH 20 (5 p.m.) — SUNDAY, MARCH 22

• Polar Bear Night Walk • Delicious Food
• Children's Megilla Reading/Costume Party/And Talent Show
• Wine and Cheese Party • Night Time Coverage
• Children's Shabbat Service •

MEET NEW FAMILIES IN A RELAXED SETTING

FRESH AIR SOCIETY

6600 W. MAPLE ROAD
WEST BLOOMFIELD, MICHIGAN 48033
(313) 661-0600

I'

L':

)i I; ;11.:

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