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February 20, 1981 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

24

Friday, February 20, 1981

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Arab Intelligentsia Impact Debated

HURRY! BEFORE
TIME RUNS OUT

MARCH 1
1981

NCCJ Chief
Issues Warning
on Hate Groups

NEW YORK — Dr. David
Hyatt, president of the Na-
tional Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews, told the
organization's national
board of trustees of the re-
' surgence and the potential
danger of hate groups in
America and called upon
them to help "awaken the
conscience of America to its
crying human relations
needs."
Dr. Hyatt addressed the
trustees at the group's an-
nual meeting at the
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, and
noted the rise in anti-
Semitic and anti-black inci-
dents during 1980.
Hyatt cited 1980 inci-
dents such as the shooting of
National Urban League
President Vernon Jordan;
the vandalism of
synagogues and Jewish
cemeteries; the bombing of
a Paris synagogue that kil-
led four persons; the offhand
anti-Semitic remarks by the
president of the Southern
Baptist Convention which
drew heated controversy;
the murder of six black
males in upstate New York;
the bizarre case of the dead
and missing black children
in the South; and the plight
of the Hispanic community
in America, as issues of
paramount concern for
everyone.

SAVE UP TO

HAMILTON
PLACE DUES There's never been a
better time to join
GO UP
Hamilton Place
MARCH 1ST than NOW!

Now before rates go up
March 1st. Now while
you can SAVE UP TO

5 425.

..

Jewish Agenda
Council Meets

.

Hamilton Place, the com-
plete Social and Fitness
Club in Southfield. Relax
in the indoor pool, jog
around the indoor track,
exercise on Nautilus
Equipment. Dine with
your friends at Cafe
Rouge, now under the
direction of the Hamilton
Place and Golden
Mushroom Chef Milos.
Join now and have the
best summer of your life.
Hurry before time runs
out.

TEL AVIV (JNI) — Seven
members of the Knesset
Arab Education sub-
committee expressed pes-
simism concerning the
mood and absorption of the
Middle East's burgeoning
Arab intelligentsia during a
seminar at Tel Aviv Uni-
versity's Shiloah Institute
for Middle East Studies.
According to the insti-
tute, the number of univer-
sity students in Arab coun-
tries increased by 250 per-
cent since 1972, to total over
one million. Of the 70,000
Palestinians studying
throughout the world, two-
thirds are being educated in
the Middle East.
The institute estimates

GOLDEN
MUSHROOM
COMES TO
HAMILTON
PLACE

'

Golden Mushroom
owner. Reid Ashton,
and internationally
acclaimed Chef Milos.
will also be directing
food services
at Hamilton Place. Join
Now and taste the
difference.

30333 Southfield Rd.
(Between 12 and 13 Mile Rds.)
Call 646-8990 Between
9:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m.

HAMILTON PLACE

NEW YORK — The Na-
tional Council of New
Jewish Agenda met in
January in New York and
reaffirmed the organiza-
tion's commitment to "the
validity and vitality of pro-
gressive Jewish values at a
time when many have lost
faith that the goals of justice
and peace are attainable."
The council announced
that Agenda expects to
enlist several thousand
members during its first
year and to form at least 25
chapters nationwide. Af-
filiates will be linked
through a newsletter and
the national council.
At the founding confer-
ence in December, the 700
participants proposed some
40 task forces on issues such
as the environment, anti-
Semitism, Israel, the arts
and world hunger.

that five percent of the
world Arab population, or 2
million, will receive aca-
demic certification by the
year 2000. In 1975, 0.5 per-
cent had obtained degrees.
"But the Arab coun-
tries can't absorb all
these academicians,"
stated Dr. Chagay
Ehrlich. Its premature
to say they could turn the
tables, but they could
contribute to regional
destabilization."
disproportionate
"A
number of Israeli Arabs
learn professions where
they won't be dependent on
the establishment for a job,
creating few job openings,"
stated Shiloah director Eli
Reches. Israeli Arab
graduates (25,000 currently
enrolled in secondary
schools and 4,000 in higher
education) also have diffi-
culty finding employment
"due to prejudice which is
usually unjustified," he con-
tinued.
Jews tend to blur the line
between civil rights and na-
tional aspirations of Israeli
Arabs, added MK Shmuel
Toledano. He disagreed
with Reches' demographic
conclusion that 23 percent
of Israel's population will be
Arab within 20 years say-
ing, "When their cultural
level increases, Arab family
growth will decline."

SBA Policy Hit

WASHINGTON — The
Small Business Adminis-
tration (SBA) has been
urged to adopt regulations
ending the presumption
that racial minorities are
automatically eligible for
assistance and requiring in-
stead that all small
businesses which seek SBA
assistance prove they are
"socially disadvantaged."
The proposal was contained
in a formal comment on the
SBA's proposed new regula-
tions submitted by the
American Jewish Congress
in behalf of itself and the
American Jewish Commit-
tee, Anti-Defamation
League of Bnai Brith and
Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council of New York.

Dispute Over
`Moonies' Hits
Catskill Town

ACCORD, N.Y. — The
purchase of a summer camp
site by the Unification
Church of Rev. Sun Myung
Moon has angered residents
and incited violence in this
town at the base of the
Catskill Mountains.
Opponents of the camp
say that church members
disturb the peace and
harass their neighbors and
that people have turned up
at homes in the area asking
for help after having been
"recruited" to the camp
under false pretenses.
Church officials deny the
charges and note that the
U.S. Justice Department
plans to investigate a long
list of alleged instances of
arson, vandalism and
harassment by members of
the community.

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