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January 30, 1981 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1981-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

36 Friday, January 30, 1981

El Al Strike Is Curtailed

TEL AVIV (JTA) — The
general strike that
paralyzed El AI last week
ended 48 hours later follow-
ing the reinstatement of six
maintenance workers'
committee members fired
earlier for staging an un-
authorized work stoppage.
El Al board chairman Av-
raham Shavit rescinded the
dismissal notices under the
threat of sympathy strikes
by 13 major trade unions
that would have brought Is-
rael's entire economy to a
halt.
While Israel's national
air carrier was operating
again, the brief strike cost
the financially beleaguered
company hundreds of
thousands of dollars in lost
revenue and its future re-
mained uncertain. Shavit
himself came under fire
from fellow board members
for giving in to the workers.
During the crisis, the El
Al board was seriously
considering shutting
down the airline and

reorganizing it on a
tighter basis that would
eliminate the multiplicity
of workers committees.
Shavit obtained labor's
agreement to a retrench-
ment plan to stem the com-
pany's losses. But it was re-
jected by Transport Minis-
ter Haim Landau who sent
word from his, hospital bed
— where he is recovering
from a leg amputation —
that he was not prepared to
grant El Al additional gov-
ernment funds under those
conditions.
As a result, the El Al em-
ployees have petitioned a
labor court to nullify- the
compromise agreement on
grounds that the govern-
ment's attitude made it a
"dead letter."

It is impossible to indulge
in habitual severity of opin-
ion upon our fellow-men
without injuring the ten-
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Mild Reaction From Israel Is Reported
on Reagan Stand on Settlements, PLO

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
The Foreign Ministry
spokesman in Jerusalem
tended to downplay Tues-
day the U.S. State Depart-
ment statement against the
settlements and about the
PLO
spokesman
The
suggested to take the
American statement as it is,
in other words, the spokes-
man said, it was only
natural for the new ad-
ministration to take a look
at its commitments around
the world.
As for the State Depart-
ment's comments on
Jerusalem and the settle-
ments, the spokesman said,
this appeared to be a con-
tinuation of American pol-
icy.
The spokesman did
take issue with the re-
marks about possible
moderate elements in the
PLO. In Israel's view, the
PLO is an extremist, ter-
rorist organization. The
existence of any moder-
ate elements in the PLO,
was still to be proven, he
said. Even if there are
such moderates, the main
question is to what extent
they influence the plo's
policy.
Israel believes that the
PLO is committed by its
covenant and its very na-
ture to the annihilation of
the state by any method, in-
cluding terrorism. Israel
had yet to detect any so-
called moderation, he said.
If someone else had, this did
not affect the PLO stand, he
added.
Israel believes that the
U.S. is committed to
President Reagan's re-
marks that the PLO is a ter-
rorist organization.
Secretary of State Ale-
xander Haig was qouted as
saying that "so long as the

PLO advocates views in-
compatible with the peace
progress, the U.S. will not
recognize or negotiate with
the PLO."
The Haig statement
and the remarks by State
Department spokesman
William Dyess omitted
any reference to the
PLO's acceptance of
United Nations Security
Council Resolution 242
and 338 and Israel's right
to exist — points that
characterized the Carter
Administration's policy
toward the PLO.
Asked to state whether
the Reagan Administra-
tion's position does include
those aspects of the Carter
policy, Dyess demurred. He
observed that he was pro-
viding a response to the
questions asked and that
the new Administration
needs time to formulate its
policies.
Dyess was asked whether
the structure of his state-
ment indicated that the Re-
agan Administration was
willing to deal with the PLO
apart from negotiating, but
on a pattern of the former
Ambassador to the UN An-
drew Young's conversation
with the PLO in New York
in July 1979.
"No, No," Dyess ex-
plained. "There is no tricky
language here." Hp said
"There is no hidden mean-
ing here — a loophole to go
through — to talk with
them."
He said that "current
American policy" is the
Reagan Administration
policy which gave rise to
questions that the
Mideast policy has al-
ready been formulated,
but Dyess denied this.
In another statement
touching on this point and
with reassurance to Israel,

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Dyess said the Administra-
tion is conducting a policy
review expected of a new
administration and added,
"in particular the U.S.
commitment to Israel and
other friendly states in the
area remain very firm and
we expect no significant
change with any country.
One of the many purposes of -
the review is to determine
ways in which we can better
support our friends."
Meanwhile, the Reagan
Administration said that it
is reviewing "the entire pol-
icy" of the U.S. toward the
Arab-Israeli conflict, in-
cluding the issue of Jewish
settlements on the West
Bank and the attitude
toward the PLO.
This disclosure was made
at the State Department in
response to questions as to
whether the Reagan Ad-
ministration was consider-
ing the announcement by
the Israeli government in
Jerusalem that it will build
10 more settlements on the
West Bank in the next five
months before Israel's par-
liamentary elections.
Dyess said that "While
we were aware of plans
which were previously
announced, we do not
consider the carrying out
of these plans to be help-
ful."
Dyess was questioned
about the statement made
by the U.S. Ambassador to
Saudi Arabia, John West, iri
a recent interview in which
he was reported to have said
that he feels "very strongly"
about "our failure to even
think to talk or listen to the
PLO or to engage in any
dialogue."
West, a former governor
of South Carolina who has
been in Saudi Arabia al-
most four years, said in the
interview that U.S. policy
toward the PLO "is very dif-
ficult to explain or justify to
Saudi Arabia or other
Arabs."
Asked if West was speak-
ing for the Reagan Ad-
ministration, Dyess replied,
"No, no. West clearly was
speaking personally and not
for this Administration."
Meanwhile, in reports
reaching here from
Cairo, Egyptian Foreign
Minister Kamal Hassan
Ali called for a dialogue
between the PLO and the
Reagan Administration.
Asked to comment on
Saudi Arabia's King
Khalid's statement to the
Islamic summit meeting in
Taif, Saudi Arabia, which
included a call for all Is-
lamic nations to unite in a
holy war against Israel to
recover Jerusalem, Dyess
noted that "from press re-
ports" the Khalid call would
include money, men and
even arms and that such
statements had been made
previously on other special
Islamic occasions.
"For our part," he said,
the U.S. position is for all to
avoid positions which 'com-
plicate' the peace search.
At his first press con-
ference on Wednesday

afternoon, Secretary of
State Haig was asked to
clarify the U.S. position
towards the PLO and
Jerusalem. He re-
sponded:
"First, President Reagan
has stated, every American
President since 1975 has
stated, we will neither rec-
ognize nor negotiate wit
the PLO so long as they re.
fuse to recognize the right of
the state of Israel to exist,
for so long as they refuse to
accept provisions of 242 and
the other United Nations
resolutions . . .
"With respect to Pales-
tine (Haig later corrected
himself. He was referring to
Jerusalem.) as an entity for
30 years, I think, the United
States has felt that this is a
matter that has interna-
tional implications and
should be a city that is not
divided by barbed wire or
- imposed unilateral re-
straints.
"We don't welcome un-
ilateral action that makes
this kind of an international
consensus impossible."

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