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November 21, 1980 - Image 27

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1980-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

New Farm Machine Separates
Valuable Produce from Soil

BEIT DAGAN — A new
machine, developed by Dr.
Arthur Saltzman, of Israel's
Agricultural Research
Organization, and his assis-
tant, Amos Mizrahi, can
separate agricultural pro-
duce cultivated in the soil
(potatoes and flower bulbs)
from the chunks of earth
and stones that accompany
hem into the harvester.
After five years of ex-
perimental research and
development by Saltzman,
the organization has signed
a contract with an Ashkelon
engineering firm for the
commercial production of
the machine, and the first
models are already being
tested in the field.
The underlying principle
of the separation process is
the "fluidized bed." In this
process, elements bearing
different specific gravities

are immersed in a fluid. Air
is then passed through the
mixture. Those elements
with a higher specific
gravity than that of the
fluid float to_ the top while
those with a lower specific
gravity sink to the bottom.

Last year, the pro-
totypes were put into op-
eration at Kibutz Ramat
Hagolan and Moshav
Yodfat, cooperative set-
tlements in Israel. The re-
sults were excellent, sav-
ing time and manpower.
Last year's experi-
ments led to a contract
between the Agricultural
Research Organization
and the engineering firm
of Pachtaas Ashkelon for
the commercial produc-
tion of the separator,
with Saltzman responsi-
ble for ongoing research

I

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Story Behind Hanuka Gelt

NEW YORK — Have you
ever thought about why we
give and receive Hanuka
gelt on Hanuka? There
seems to be no mention of
gift-giving in the story of
the Maccabees. So how did
this custom begin? Some in-
teresting answers are found
in an article in World Over
Magazine, a publication of
the Board of Education of
Greater New York.
Hanuka has been cele-
brated for a very long time.
The main part of the holiday
has always been lighting
candles for eight days. Tra-
ditionally, when the candles
were burning, no work was
done. This was a time when
family and friends would
gather together to celebrate
the holiday and relax and
enjoy each others' company.
Often during this time
the story of the Maccabees
was told, and then both
children and adults would
play a complicated game of
riddles, where the number
value of the letters in the
answer to the riddle had to
add up to 44. This is the
same number of candles lit
during the eight days of
Hanuka.
During the Middle Ages
in the some communities,
other games began to be
played; among them, cards.
At first, the rabbis were op-
posed to this because the
lalmud does not approve of
,ambling. The rabbis then
decided, however, that on
happy occasions and holi-
days, such as weddings, the
New Moon, Purim, and
Hanuka, card playing was
permitted.
Soon another game be-
came very popular, espe-
cially in Germany and Po-
land. This game was played
often on Hanuka, and it, too
included winning and los-
ing. The game was called
`Dreidel' — the same game
we play today. The dreidel,
of course, is the four-sided
top, with a Hebrew letter on
each side. The Gimmel
means "take all." The Heh
stands for "half." The Nun
stands for "nothing" and the
Shin means "put in."

After the dreidel stops
spinning, whatever letter is
on top tells the player what
to do. So if the Shin is on top,
you put your coins or chips
in the pot; if you are lucky
enough to get a Gimmel,
you take all the coins in the
pot.
For a long time, only
adults played cards and
dreidel. Finally, in the
1700s, children began to
play dreidel. The children,
at first, did clot use any
coins. It's certainly less fun
if you cannot win or lose. To
solve this problem, children
were given coins or "gelt" so
they could properly play
dreidel. The children, of
course, were delighted.
From then on, they expected
a small amount of coins for
Hanuka.

Canadian Group,
Brings Falashas
to North America

MONTREAL (JTA) —
Three Ethiopian Jews, the
first Falashas to immigrate
directly to North America,
have arrived in Canada
where they will reside for a
time although they intend
to settle in Israel eventu-
ally. Their names were not
disclosed in order to protect
relatives living in Ethiopia.
The Falashas were ad-
mitted to Canada through
the efforts of the newly
formed Canadian Associa-
tion for Ethiopian Jewry,
chaired by Bruce Gottlieb
and because of the friendly
relations existing between
Canada and Ethiopia.
Gottlieb, a college professor
and Baruch Tegegne, an
Ethiopian Jew, both of
Montreal, said they intend
to help bring more Falashas
to Canada in the future if
possible.
The association, head-
quartered in Toronto, plans
to raise money to aid in the
rescue of the Falashas and
assist their integration in
Israel.

The only whole heart is
the one that has been
broken.

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21

NOVEMBER SPECIAL

and
development.
Saltzman made far-
reaching changes and
produced two new pro-
totypes, which have a
potential net output of 20
tons of potatoes per hour
and 15 tens of flower
bulbs.

If the machines, which
are being tested at Yodfat
and in the Bnai Shimon
regional council, live up to
expectations, they will in-
volve a savings of 70 'work-
ers: 20 in the separation
process and 50 in the field.
The Russian-born scien-
tist, who arrived in Israel in
1973, estimates that the
company will sell 40
machines in Israel alone
and that the possibilities
abroad are vast.

Friday, November 21 1

Mon's 1/2 carat
Diamond ring $2.600

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