100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 07, 1980 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1980-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Romanians Live Together as -Neighbors in Jerusalem

By CARL ALPERT

JERUSALEM — The
magnificent, large church
building of the Romanian
Orthodox Patriarchate
faces Shivtei Israel Street,
but its rear door on
HaHoma Hashlishit Streets
serves as the main exit and
entrance for the bearded,
black-gowned monks who
come and go for prayer serv-
ices or the many other reli-
gious activities which keep
the clerics occupied.
They are solemn-looking
individuals who appear to
carry on their shoulders the
veight of many transgres-
sions in a godless world. The
unpaved path from the
church door to the street
passes through a thickly
planted garden, over which
tower several lofty pine
trees. Each breeze sets the
boughs in swaying motion
and a heavy wind stimu-
lates the branches into
touching the house next
door.
The victim is an old stone
building occupied by a large
Orthodox family. The head
of the household, Rabbi
David Swartz, is also

bearded and like his
neighbors wears a black
gown, but there is no danger
of confusion. His long, curl-
ing earlocks and the
stringed fringes which fly
out from the sides of his
gown clearly identify what
is sometimes called a Mea
Shearim type.
The children — there
were nine at last count —
were constantly coming
and going. The girls, no
matter what their age, all
had long black stockings
and wore dresses with
sleeves to the wrists, even
in warm weather.
they
Occasionally
glanced up at the pine
boughs from next door, chaf-
ing the side of their home,
and as quickly averted their
gaze, as if they were looking
at something immodest, or
at least embarrassing.
Among themselves they
spoke Yiddish, rather than
Hebrew.
There were all the mak-
ings here of an explosive
confrontation. Differences
between religious ex-
tremists as the basis for a
row among neighbors have

been known to develop into
inter-communal riots, and
could even have interna-
tional political implica-
tions. In human history
wars have been known to
have broken out as a result
of lesser disputes.
We stopped and watched
as history was made before
our eyes. The father of nine,
the intense rabbi, walked
down his front steps, turned
right, and then stepped into
the (forbidden?) grounds of
the church.
He walked quickly up
to the burly figure of the
man whom we later iden-
tified as Vasile Cornila,
the Archimandrite and
Head of the Romanian
Orthodox Church in
Jerusalem. The latter
was more than a head tal-
ler than the rabbi, and
perhaps twice his weight.
The two engaged in ani-
mated conversation. They
gesticulated. The rabbi
pointed to the trees, to his
house; his comments were
obvious, though we were too
far away to hear the voices.
And so we approached
closer, and dared even to
step into the courtyard. To

Wallenberg Hearings Scheduled

LOS ANGELES (JTA) —
A group of international
personalities led by Simon
Wiesenthal will convene
formal hearings in Stoc-
kholm, Sweden Jan. 15-17
to hear testimony on the
fate of the lost hero of the
Holocaust, Raoul Wallen-
berg, it was announced by
Rabbi Abraham Cooper,
assistant to the Dean of the
Simon Wiesenthal Center
for Holocaust Studies at
Yeshiva University of Los
Angeles, upon his return
from consultations with the
Wallenberg family in Stoc-
kholm.

changed their story to
claim that he died in
prison in 1947. However,
there have been repeated
reports from eye wit-
nesses that Wallenberg
was alive many years
after that date.
"It is hoped that this hear-
ing will focus world opinion
on the plight of this great
humanitarian and encour-
age Soviet cooperation,"
Cooper explained. "in view
of the recent spate of neo-
Nazi- activity in Europe and
elsewhere, the deeds and le-
gacy of Raoul Wallenberg
have never been more re-

levant for humanity than
they are in 1980.
"Many young people in
France, Italy, Belgium,
England, South America
and the United States know
nothing of that tragic era
and are increasingly being
exposed to the haters of this
generation."
Cooper also announced
that the Wallenberg family
will attend the interna-
tional conference in Madrid,
which is to review com-
pliance with the Helsinki
Accords, to press for the in-
clusion of Raoul's fate in
that international forum.

U.S. Jews Urged to Invest
in WB Jewish Settlements

RAOUL WALLENBERG

The hearings will be
coordinated with the Inter-
national Sakharov Com-
mittee based in Copenha-
gen. The dates of the hear-
ings coincide with the 36th
anniversary of Wallen-
berg's disappearance in
Budapest, Hungary.
Wallenberg, a Swedish
Gentile educated at the
University of Michigan,
risked his life to save more
than 30,000 Jews in
Budapest during the closing
months of World War II. He
was jailed by the Soviets in
1945.
The Russians at first
denied any knowledge of
Wallenberg. Later they

NEW YORK (JTA) — Is-
raeli Agriculture Minister
Ariel Sharon called on
American Jews to invest in
Jewish settlements in
"Judea, Samaria, Gaza and
Galilee" to bolster Israel's
response to the dangers
that, he said, surround it.
For Jews to live in those
areas, "is safer and stronger
than any guarantee," he de-
clared.
Sharon, an outspoken ad-
vocate of massive Jewish
settlement in the occupied
territories, addressed some
450 people gathered at the
Roosevelt Hotel in New
York to inaugurate the "In-
ternational Conference for
P.E.A.C.E." The name is an
acronym for "Preventing
the Emergence of Another
Arab Country in Eretz Yis-
rael — Judea, Samaria and
Gaza."
Sharon called on
American Jewish com-
munities to adopt settle-
ments in those territories,
all of which except
Galilee, lie outside Is-
rael's 1967 borders, to
help them establish in-

dustries and to "send
volunteers, even for a
short time. I came here to
urge you to act, to do
things today, now," he
said.
Sharon told his audience,
composed largely of suppor-
ters of the ultra-nationalist
Tehiya faction in Israel,
Rabbi Meir Kahane and the
Jewish Defense League,
that Israel stands in serious
danger.
"Israel is the heart of the
Jewish people" and its re-
sponsibility is to defend and
protect Jews anywhere in
the world. Therefore, "if Is-
rael will be harmed, all
Jews will be harmed," he
said.
Sharon warned the U.S.
not to interfere in problems
and questions related to Is-
rael's security and exist-
ence.

A man should live with
his superiors as he does with
his fire: not too near, lest he
burn; nor too far off, lest he
freeze.
—Diogenes

Friday, November 7, 1980 33

BEAUTIFUL HAND KNIT

LAP ROBES AND AFGHANS

By EVELYN

our surprise, their voices is n .fyLre voisin, our
Toasty Warm for Those You Love
were not raised. They were neighbor, and the very word
up to 1/2 OFF FOR NOV.
seemed to sum up the whole
even smiling.
Call 356-3669 or 546-08
Obviously this was not story.
their first confrontation on
this vital issue, for even as
LIFE'S SPECIAL EVENTS
we stood there a team of
SHOULD BE RECORDED FOREVER
Arab laborers, with a
• • •
power-operated saw, ap-
peared on the scene and
HAVE YOUR SPECIAL OCCASION
went quickly to work. One
of the offending trees was
VIDEO TAPED
levelled completely, and
• Weddings • Bar Mitzvas • Private Parties
was sawed up into logs. The
• Anniversaries • Birthdays • Etc.
Arabs climbed the others,
See Our FULL-SERVICE Studio
and as the rabbi pointed,
they sawed off the offending
branches. The Archiman-
drite nodded, and even lent
Established 10 years
a hand at tugging the fallen
boughs aside.
22530 W. 8 Mile Rd. 35-Video
During a pause in the op-
or 358-4336
Southfield
erations I took the Jew
aside, and asked how long
he had been having trouble
with the church. He looked
at me in surprise. There had
been no trouble. They were
his neighbors, and his em-
phasis on the word implied a
special kind of relationship.
He had been there for
30 years, ever since his
arrival from his native
Romania, and so he had a
common language with
them. Rabbi. Swartz
looked surprised when I
commented on how un-
usual this was. He re-
peated, "They are my
neighbors."
I went in to see the Ar-
chimandrite. We spoke in
French. Had the Jew next
door complained a great
deal? Not at all! There had
been no complaints. A prob-
nc.
lem had been pointed out,
Farmington Hills
31313 Northwestern
and the two quickly reached
• Jewelry Designers & Manufacturers
agreement.
of Original Cy Unusual Creations
After all, said the Ar-
Authorized Appraisers • Estate Liquidators
chimandrite, Rabbi Swartz

LEGAL TAPES, INC.

'<nom) by the
GomParV
Wz Keep

CITIZEN

p

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW!

Beth Achim Men's Club

ANNUAL WINTER BALL

DINNER-DANCE

Wednesday, December 31, 1980 — 9:00 P.M.

CONG. BETH ACHIM'S
WASSERMAN HALL

21100

W. 12 Mile Road — Southfield, Mich. 48076

Music By

SAM BARNETT

and his Orchestra, with featured Vocalist

All Seats Reserved. Full Sit-Down Catered Dinner
Favors. Setups (B.Y.O.B.). If Wine, Kosher only.
Continental Breakfast

• All Seats Reserved • Full Sit-Down Catered Dinner
• Favors • Setups (B.Y.O.B.) If Wine, Kosher only
• Continental Breakfast • Enlarged Dance Floor

Donation $27.50 per person
For Reservation Call
557-8097
Morris Penner
355-0594
Joseph Silverstein
352-8670i
Cong. Beth Achim Office

Black Tie Optional

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan