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May 23, 1980 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1980-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

30 Friday, May 23, 1980

Wind Ensemble
Opens Auditions

Danny Raskin's

LISTENING
POST

By I.M. RAVEN

Guest Columnist

"We stand today on the
edge of a new frontier — the
frontier of the 1960s, a fron-
tier of unknown oppor-
tunities and perils, a fron-
tier of unfulfilled hopes and
threats." — John F. Ken-
nedy, July 1960.
Those same words could
be said of the 1980s. Leaders
change and so do the prob-
lems, but in many ways
time stands still. Was 1960
only yesterday and the day
before?
Lapel buttons in that de-
cade gave people a way of
expressing their views on a
variety of controversial is-
sues. They said "Burn Baby
Burn," "Hippy Power,"
"Suppose Theyr Gave a War
and Nobody Came." "I Am a
Human Being; Do Not Fold,
Spindle or Mutilate," and
"Ban the Bra."
For Kennedy and Jac-
kie it was Camelot. They
believed the glow from
the fire of energy, faith
and devotion could truly
light the world. That light
faded when Kennedy was
assasinated in Dallas.
Kids in the Haight-
Ashbury section of San
Francisco called themselves
"beautiful freaks." We
called them "hippies" or
"flower children."
Beatles John Lennon,
Paul McCartney, George
Harrison and Ringo Starr
cavorted in the "Yellow
Submarine." "Hippies" with
long hair, ragged blue jeans,
feathers, baubles and beads
held love-ins and listened to
rock and blues music in
Woodstock, N.Y. They wore
funny clothes, smoked pot
and made love.
Bob Dylan, rock poet of
the Now Generation, sang
"Like a Rolling Stone."
That's how a lot of kids felt
in the 1960s so they decided
to live together in com-
munes. And young rebels
got caught up in
psychedelia triggered by
music, sex' and drugs.
Kids went to pot and
other drugs, joined Hare
Krishna cults and staged
protests against war.
Two days after Kennedy
was murdered, Lee Os-
wald, who was arrested
for the shooting, was kil-
led by nightclub owner
Jack Ruby. OsWald was
shot in full view of mil-
lions of America-ns
watching TV.
That was Nov. 24, 1963.
In April 1968, civil rights
leader Martin Luther King,
Jr. was killed in Memphis
by ex-convict James Earl
Ray. In June, Sen. Robert
Kennedy was assassinated
by Sirhan Sirhan, a Jorda-
nian immigrant.
Kids continued to show
their rebellion against con-
vention by the outlandish
way they dressed. Then
came Twiggy in a miniskirt
and she set a new trend.
During the long, hot

summer of 1967, a race riot
broke out in Detroit and $44
million worth of property
crumbled. What was worse
were 42 deaths and 386 per-
sons injured after nine days
of burning and looting.
"Black is beautiful"
was the slogan of black
Americans learning to
respect their self-images
and heritage. Malcolm X
led the search for African
cultural roots.
President
Lyndon
Johnson rode horseback on
his Texas ranch. Julie
Nixon and David
Eisenhower got married.
Andy Warhol started a
pop-art revolution with
soup cans. Hollywood's sex
symbol was Raquel Welch.
Dan Rowan and Dick Mar-
tin's "Laugh-in" was the
most popular show on TV.
Jackie Kennedy married
Greek shipping tycoon Aris-
totle Onassis.
University of California
drop-out Jerry Rubin and
fellow militant Abbie
Hoffman organized the
"Yippie§" and held a mock
convention in Chicago.
Sen. Eugene McCarthy
campaigned for President
by challenging the war in
Vietnam and attracting a
devoted following of youths.
Tiny Tim squeaked "Tiptoe
Through the Tulips" and
Johnny Carson topped the
late night TV talk shows.
David Brinkley and Chet
Huntley were the decade's
top team of newscasters.
Chicago Mayor
Richard Dailey won na-
tional recognition during
the 1968 Democratic
Convention when his
police force beat up
young demonstrators.
Dr. Benjamin Spock, who
wrote the world's best-
selling baby book, coun-
seled young people on
how to evade the draft.
Jacqueline Susann's
"Valley of the Dolls" was a
best-seller and so was Betty
Friedan's "The Feminine
Mystique." The book
sparked the Women's Lib-
eration movement.
Richard Nixon beat
Hubert Humphrey for the
Presidency in 1968 and Vice
President Spiro Agnew
preached to anti-war pro-
testors. Cassius Clay won
the world heavyweight box-
ing championship.
There were more Doves
than Hawks during the war
in Vietnam and science fic-
tion came true in the space
age.
That was the 1960s.
There may never be a de-
cade like it. But it's too soon
to tell what the 1980s will
bring.

Prejudices, it is well
known, are most difficult to
eradicate from the heart
whose soil has never been
loosened or fertilized by
education; they grow there,
firm as weeds among stones.
—Charlotte Bronte

Auditions for the new
Sarin Symphonic Wind
Ensemble of Southfield for
gifted high school-age
musicians in southeastern
Michigan will be held June
7 and 8 at Southfield Parks
and Recreation Building.
For appointments for
auditions, call Marlow Bal-
langer, cultural arts direc-
tor, 354-4717.

celebrate your
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Reservations Accepted

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Mini•Vacations Minutes Away.

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HONEYMOONING

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t •

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