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May 09, 1980 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1980-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

frida

METROPOLITAN FOOT SURGEONS, P.C.

U.S. Jewry Is Still on the Move

By DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright 1980, JTA, Inc.)

(Editor's note: Colum-
nist David Schwartz died
April 29 at age 84.)
The other day the New
York Times had a big story
telling how American Jews
seemed to be moving in in-
creasing numbers to the
sunbelt — California, Geor-
gia, Arizona, Florida. One
town in California, which
five years ago had only one
synagogue, now has six
synagogues. The Jewish
population of Phoenix,
Ariz., gets a bit larger every
day and so on.
; There is no doubt about it.
Jews move around a good
bit and they like the sun-
shine, but Jews have been
moving about .a long time
and so have a lot of people
who are not Jews.
Take Georgia, for exam-.
ple. The Jewish population
is growing but the Jewish
population of Georgia began
with the first building of
that state. The first white
child born in Georgia,
Philip Minis, was a Jew.
The first governor of the
state of Georgia after the
end of the Revolutionary
War was a Jew — David
Emanuel. Emanuel County
in Georgia is named after
him.
Atlanta has for long
had a sizeable Jewish
population. Of course, it
has grown, but so has the
general population. Fifty
years or so ago, the popu-
lation of Atlanta was
under 100,000. Today it is
over a million.
I don't know what the
Jewish population of At-
lanta is — I would guess it's
around 25,000 today. The
town of Savannah, Ga., an-
other important city of that
state, had one of the first
Jewish mayors in the coun-
try and also one of the first
Jewish chiefs of police.
Florida has become a
great attraction especially
for the retired Jew, but way
back before the Civil War,
Florida had a Jewish
United States Senator,
David Yulee.
South Carolina in early
American days was some-
thing of a Jewish center.
The first man to die in the
cause of independence in
South Carolina was a Jew
and there is a tradition that
a whole company or at least
a great part of one company

'

.

of ,1776 fighters was re-
cruited from one street in
Charleston which was con-
sidered then a sort of ghetto.
By 'the way, the great
Alexander Hamilton had a
half-Jewish half-brother,
Peter Levine, who lived, in
Charleston. Peter and. Ale-
xander Hamilton were the
children of the same
mother, but not the same
father. The mother was first
married to the Jew, Levine,
but she 'later left him and
lived with a Scotsman
named Hamilton. Alexan-
der Hamilton was the
offspring of this last al-
liance.
Richmond, Va., in early
American days, had a con-
siderable Jewish popula-
tion. That's where Jefferson
made_his Jewish contacts.
Many prominent
northern Jews originally
came from the south. The
Straitsses, Oscar the
statesman and Nathan
the philanthropist, first
lived in the south. Ber-
nard Baruch was another
prominent American
who hailed from the
south, as did the Bran-
deises, whose original
home was Kentucky.
'People are always mov-
ing. Adam moved into the
Garden of Eden but later got
an eviction notice. The first
Jews to settle in America
came to Manhattan from
Brazil.
The Pilgrims who settled
around Boston originally
planned to go to Virginia
but when they came down
the New England coast,
their beer supply gave out,
so they decided to stop at
Boston and fill up. Colum-
bus himself, as we know,
was on his way originally to
China but when he came to
America he said, "This is
where George Washington
lives. I will stop here."
During the middle of the
19th Century, a fellow
named James Marshall had
a fever. He sent down to the
drug store to get some aspi-
rin, but they told him that
aspirin had not yet been in-
vented, so he decided to go to
California. Ma‘ybe the cli-
mate there would cure him.
Everybody of course knows
what happened then. One
time he happened to look at
the ground and saw some-
thing shining — and that
started the Gold Rush to
California.

BRUCE M. JACOB, D.P.M.
ROBERT T. KIRSCHENBAUM, D.P.M.

A Jewish tailor, named
Levi, said to himself,
"Why should I sit here
making pants? I will join
the Gold Rush and strike
it rich and I will never
need to pant again for
money. So he joined the
Gold Rush, but once you
have made a pair of pants
,you can't stop.
' He looked at all those in
the Gold Rush digging in
California for gold. "I could
make a pair of pants," he
said, "in which they will be
much more comfortable." So
he made a pair of jeans and
people even today are mov-
ing about wearing this
brand of 'jeans. They call
them Levis.

FOOT SPECIALISTS
FOOT SURGEONS

ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE
OPENING OF THEIR NEW OFFICE AT:

BIRCHWOOD MEDICAL PLAZA
26771 W. 12 MILE RD. SUITE 102
SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48034

(2 blocks west of Northwestern Hwy.)

By Appointment
354-2122

+RI

v 1 . 780 A ). AE cNIOLOS TOBACCO CO

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20 °GA

BBC Reporter Says U.S
Was Behind 242 Initiative

LONDON (ZINS) — The
British plan to push in the
United Nations for modifi-
cation of UN Resolution 242
actually originated in
Washington, according to
British Broadcasting corre-
spondent Michael Elkins.
He says that former Sec-
retary of State Cyrus Vance
asked the head of the Social
Science Department of Yale
University, Collin
Williams, to prepare a new
draft of 242, one that would
placate the Palestinians.
According to Elkins, the
Williams' draft was ap-
proved by both Vance and

.

National Security Adviser
Zbigniew Brzezinski.
Contacts were opened
with British Foreign Secre-
tary Carrington, with the
intention that London
would open secret talks
with the PLO. According to.
Elkins, these secret talks
led to a meeting in Vienna
last summer between Yasir
Arafat, head of the PLO,
Bruno Kreisky, Austrian
chancellor, and former
German Chancellor Willy
Brandt. American dip-
lomats also met secretly in
Vienna with the PLO, ac-
cording to Elkins.

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Warning the Surgeon General Has Determined
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