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February 01, 1980 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1980-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, Feirmary 1, 1980 73

Rejectionists Forget Years of Peace-making

By SOLLY PRESS
JOHANNESBURG
(JTA) — Arab rejectionism
seems to be still a function
of the hate/fear syndrome
vis-a-vis modernistic,
democratic Israel, whom
the rejectionists regard as a
"threat" to their own to-
talitarian failings and as a
"bad" example for the Arab
masses.
For a generation Israel
has been depicted by the
Asian Arabs as more
dangerous than the super-
powers and their rivalries.
The last thing the rejec-
tionists would like to be re-
minded of is the fact that, a
mere two generations ago,
they were the ones to wel-
come Zionism and Zionists

Bar-Ilan Guides
Israel Rabbis in
Communal Work

NEW YORK — Under
the direction of the Bar-Ilan
University — Brookdale
Program for Senior Citizens
in Israel, a first-time drive
has been launched to bring
local rabbis out of the
synagogue to confront the
problems of Israeli society.
The entry of community
rabbis into a project to meet
the psychological and emo-
tional needs of Israel's
rapidly-growing aging
population will be the first
phase of this ongoing pro-
gram.
One of the first projects of
the program will be to pro-
vide an ongoing relation-
ship between community
rabbis and aging patients in
Israeli hospitals.
The new group program
to help senior adults con-
ducted by the Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity — Brookdale pro-
gram is co-sponsored by:
The Rabbinical Council of
America, Israel Region; De-
partment of Torah Culture
of the Ministry of Education
and Culture; and Ministry
of Religious Affairs.

Israel Volunteers
Focus of Study

NEW YORK — "Volun-
teerism in Israel" by Harry
M. Rosen, will be published
early in February in Israel
by the American Jewish
Committee. The study was
made possible by the Jacob
Blaustein Institute for the
Advancement of Human
Rights.
It is the first of a projected
series of Israel-Diaspora
studies designed to stimu-
late discussion and interac-
tion between Israelis and
American Jews.

Airline Boycott

CARIO (ZINS) — The
Arab Civil Aviation Council
Conference, meeting in
Damascus, has decided to
boycott any airline which
schedules regular air serv-
ice via Ben-Gurion Airport.

An empty brain and a
tattling tongue are very apt
to go together; the most silly
and trivial items of news or
scandal fill the former and
are retailed by the latter.

to what they, the Asian
Arabs themselves, termed
the Jewish "land of their
fathers."
At that time, the pan-
Arabs were led by the
Hashemites, an aristo-
cratic group who — to
do them justice — saw the
benefits of bringing to-
gether what they called
the "Jewish Arabs, the
Christian Arabs, and the
Muslim Arabs." Regrett-
ably, on the other hand,
the Hashemites thought
in terms of empire rather
than Common Market
regionalism.
Those Arab fatherlanders
— in a sense the Hovevei
Zion of pan-Arabism —
wanted neither Egyptians,
Iranians nor Turks as part
of the future Arab scheme of
things. Indeed, a Nejib al
Azoury observed in 1905,
the Egyptians were to be
excluded "because they do
not belong to the Arab
people; they are of the Afri-
can Berber (Hamatic or
Moorish) family; and the
language they spoke before
Islam bears no similarity to
Arabic."
Realists as well as roman-
tics will recognize the poig-
nant element in the current
strains and stresses of
Israeli-Egyptian peace-
making when it is realized
that Israel Defense Minis-
ter Ezer Weizman's uncle,
Chaim Weizmann, achieved
a peace treaty two genera-
tions ago with the then-
leader of the pan-Arabic
Hashemites, the Emir (later
King of Iraq) Feisal bin
Hussein, the great-uncle of
Jordan's King Hussein.
That was in 1919.
That agreement consisted
of nine articles, introduced
by sentiments such as "the
ancient bonds existing be-
tween the Arabs and the
Jewish people," and under-
scored by the realization
that "the surest means of
working out the consumma-
tion of their national aspi-
rations is through the
closest possible collabora-
tion in the development of
the Arab state (to be) and
(then-British ruled) Pales-
tine."
The Feisal-Weizmann
pact's articles speak of
accredited agents being
exchanged, of definite
boundaries, of mutual
guarantees, of stimulat-
ing Jewish immigration
"as quickly as possible,"
of freedom of religion, of
protecting holy places, of
economic surveys, of ac-
cord and harmony, and
of mutually agreed arbi-
tration.
The spirit of this agree-
ment was exemplified by
the remarks of the Syrian
pan-Arab moderate, Chaqri
Ganem, who stated that the
Arabs had suffered too
much like the Jews not to
"throw open to them the
doors of Palestine." Even
though Ganem thought of
linking Syria and Jewish
Palestine through federa-
tion, which is not a true
regionalist solution, how
different that all sounded to

today's "heirs" of Christian,
anti-Jewish principles and
neo-imperial charter.
(At the height of their
power the pro-Hashemite
pan-Arabs were on the as-
cendancy in Hejaz, Jordan,
momentarily in Syria and
in Iraq until 1958. The
pan-Arab Baathists today
dominate Syria and Iraq
and attempt to play a role in
North and South Yemen,
elsewhere in the peninsula,
and in Eritrea across the
Red Sea, and of course in
Lebanon.)
The dream of an Israeli-
Arab Asian peace did not
die, notwithstanding the ec-
lipse of the Hashemite-led
pan-Arabs, the results of
the Anglo-French Sykes-
Picot Treaty (first made
public by Leon Trotsky), the
Axis interlude in the
Mideast, the intra-Arab di-
visions, and of course the
later superpower rivalry
across the region.

Thus British Cabinet
Minister Richard Crossman
wrote in the "New States-
man" of the potential coop-
eration among "50 million
Semites."
In the time of Israeli
Premier Moshe Sharett
and his Lebanese coun-
terpart, President
Charles Habib Malik,
talk was heard of Israel
joining the Arab League,
via a regional defense
pact. Yet the Middle East,
being the region it is, took
the unexpected turn in
the form of the Israeli-
Egyptian peace process.
From a regional point of
view, Zion is at the apogee of
peace-making with her
neighbors. The potential for
disintegration may be a
more powerful factor in in-
ternational relations than
is the integrative impulse,
but cooperation also with
Arab Asia cannot be
excluded forever.

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