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December 07, 1979 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"IRE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

6 'Friday, teCeinber 1,1979

Israel Condemns UN's Vote

(Continued from Page 1)
but recognized that a just
solution of the Palesti-

nian problem was of
"overriding impor-
tance."

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Waldheim warned that
the situation in the Mideast
affected not only the stabil-
ity in that area but carried a
potential threat to peace
and security in the world.
The president of the Gen-
eral Assembly, Salim Salim
of Tanzania, also issued a
statement warning that un-
less the Palestine question
is resolved there will be no
peace in the Mideast.
Meanwhile, "The PLO,"
an independently-produced
Swiss film documentary on
the terrorism of the Pales-
tine Liberation Organiza-
tion, was screened at the
Anti-Defamation League of
Bnai Brith headquarters
after the United Nations re-
jected Israel's request to sc-
reen the film at the UN
building.
"The PLO," was Israel's
"answer" to the UN-
produced film "Palestinians
Do Have Rights" — a PLO
version of the Arab-Israeli
conflict.
The UN-produced film
cost the UN $80,000 and
was authorized by the Gen-
eral Assembly's Committee
on the Exercise of the In-
alienable Rights of the
Palestinian People.

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SPITZER'S

Nazis in America: A Reluctant
Topic for United-Synagogue

By ROCHELLE WOLK
KIAMESHA LAKE, N.Y.
(JTA) — Wearing the uni-
form of an SS officer, a
young rabbi strides into the
dining room of the Concord
Hotel, among the 2,000
delegates who have
gathered here for the bi-
ennial convention of the
United Synagogue of
America this past Novem-
ber.
Few people recognize the
rabbi, and some mistake
him for a neo-Nazi, register-
ing shock or fear. Neverthe-
less, no one confronts him or
tries to throw him out. Most
delegates continue to gorge
themselves on the Concord's
delicacies. Their attitude
seems to be: if we pretend
he's not here, he'll disap-
pear.
Frustrated in his efforts
to place the issue of Nazi
war criminals in America
on the convention's agenda,
Rabbi Paul Silton, educa-
tion director of Temple Is-
rael in Albany, N.Y., de-
cided to create grass roots
interest among the dele-
gates by donning the startl-
ing attire.
With the cooperation of
the- Empire and New
York Metropolitan
Regions of the United
Synagogue, Silton had
arranged a regional
meeting on the subject as

a sidelight of the conven-
tion. Costumed ' to
dramatize the issue, he
was passing out fact
sheets and invitations to
all of the delegates in the
dining room.
At the meeting, more
than 120 delegates heard
Charles Allen, Jr., an ex-
pert on Nazi war criminals
in the U.S., discuss the
"deep moral issue that de-
mands resolution." For
more than 35 years, Nazi
genocidists and col-
laborators have found
haven here, he told the
delegates, and the U.S. gov-
ernment has known of their
Nazi past.
Allen originally exposed
the scandal in 1963, but his
charges were labeled
"Communist motivated" by
then Attorney General
Robert Kennedy, he said.
Ten years later, the issue
was brought up again, after
Immigration and Naturali-
zation Service (INS) em-
ployes Vincent Schaino and
Tony Devito left the INS,
charging systematic
coverup of cases.
Crediting Rep.
Elizabeth Holtzman (D-
NY), current chairperson
of the House Judiciary
subcommittee on immig-
ration, and former Rep.
Joshua Eilberg (D-Pa.),
former chairman with

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leadership in forcing the
issue into the open, Allen
said that he now has
documented
the
presence of 286 alleged
Nazi war criminals and
collaborators living here.

"In all flat candor, - Allen
said, "the government has
not been fast enough, cer-
tain enough, or accurate
enough." He urged his audi-
ence to "encourage a posit-
ive, careful, scrupulous ap-
proach to the issue."
The only source that can
"force the final truth out" is
Holtzman's committee, he
explained. The committee
has the powers of subpoena
and contempt, and should
hold hearings to force the
intelligence agencies to re-
veal their complicity, he
concluded.
Largely through Silton's
efforts a resolution regard.
ing the proSecution of Nazi
war criminals was among
the 30-odd resolutions pre-
sented to the delegates for
their approval.
Although
United
Synagogue had joined with
other major Jewish orgari-
izations to monitor the ef-
fectiveness of prosecution of
war criminals, publicize the
need for eye-witnesses, and
recommend that congrega-
tions contact representa-
tives in Washington about
the issue, this is the first
time that a resolution was
passed by the body, accord.
ing to Muriel Berman, di-
rector of the Joint Commis-
sion on Social Action for
United Synagogue.
The resolution calls
upon the President, Con-
gress, and the Justice
Department to expedite
denaturalization and de-
portation hearings of
Nazi war criminals. It
further calls on all gov-
erment agencies to fur- .
nish necessary docu-
ments to the Office of
Special Investigation, re-
garding alleged Nazi war
criminals.
"We will not remain si-
lent to the fact that these
murderers of men, women
and children have been
allowed to find refuge in our
land," the resolution con-
cludes.
A special investigation
unit was initiated in INS in
1974; and in May of 1979
the unit became the Office
of Special Investigation in
the Criminal Divison of the
Department,
Justice
—headed by Walter Rockier.
Twelve cases are in the
courts, with a file of some
200 being investigated.
To date, not one Nazi war
criminal has ever been de-
ported from the United
(Hermine
States.
Braunateiner Ryan was ex-
tradited-to West Germany
where she is now on trial.)

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