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November 30, 1979 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

away, Novemoer 3U, WU 31

THE DETRUII JtWISH nuts

Dutch Role Under Nazis Exposed by Prof

By MAURITS KOPUIT

London Jewish Chronicle

AMSTERDAM — The
wartime Dutch govern-
ment, which went into exile
in London on May 13, 1940,
as the Nazi forces invaded
Holland, failed to help the
country's persecuted Jews,
according to Prof. Lou de
Jong, the director of the
Dutch National Institute
for War Documentation.

QUEEN WILHELMINA

The only person who
stood up for the Jews — and
was known as "Die Juden-
freunding" ("the Jews'
Friend") by the Germans —
was Queen Wilhelmina, Dr.
Jong writes in the ninth and
latest volume of The King-
dom of the Netherlands dur-
ing the Second World War"
being written at the request
of the Dutch government.
Prof. De Jong, who was a
member of Radio Orange in

London during the war,
writes in the book that
many Dutch ministers in
exile made anti-Semitic
statements, and that there
were restrictions on em-
ploying Jews at the Dutch
government offices in Lon-
don because of a fear that
there would be too many
Jewish civil servants when
the government returned to
Holland.
The Dutch government
limited its help to Jewish
refugees, and only a
number of poor Jews
benefitted. The minister
of colonies decided at the
end of 1940 not to admit
Jewish refugees to the
Dutch Antilles (in the
West Indies) or Surinam
(in South America).
Thousands of Jewish ref-
ugees who had fled from
Holland to Vichy France re-
ceived little help from
Dutch diplomatic and con-
sular representatives, and
those who failed to receive
permission to enter Spain
were rounded up and de-
ported to the death camps in
Germany and Poland.
An exception to the gen-
erally aloof attitude of the
Dutch representatives was
Sally Noach, the Dutch
Consul in Lyons, who de-
scribed himself as the "Con-
sul for Jewish refugees."

The Dutch government
was so frightened at the fate
of the Jews that it would not
employ in its intelligence
agencies Maurits Kiek, a
Dutch Jew who had worked
for the British Secret Serv-
ice since 1937.
Kiek was drafted to the
Dutch Irene Brigade and
served with the Allied
forces until the British
Secret Service applied
for his transfer and
dropped him in Belgium
in 1943, to organize an es-
cape route for Allied
pilots captured or in hid-
ing.
The Dutch Red Cross in
London refused to send par-
cels to imprisoned Dutch
Jews, as was the practice by
the Red Cross in other coun-
tries for their nationals, on
the ground that their deliv-
ery could not be checked.
The American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee
helped in this respect, but
the Dutch government
would not agree to reim-
burse the "Joint" for its ex-
penses.
Prof. De Jong wrote that
the failure of the Dutch
government-in-exile to help
Jews was not a surprise be-
cause, since 1945, several
reports had been published
about its attitude.
However, he said, each
time these reports ap-

because women are sex ob-
professor. Why? God knows.
"Children: Jessica, jects? What can you do with
Jeremy, Sebastian, Gi- air that is unacceptable?
deon. All with fancy You don't accept it, I sup-
names to get away from pose. Something else for
the Jewish families Melanie to reject. Perhaps
where every Tim, Dick you return it? For credit?
"Even the Bible, Melanie
and Harry is named
explained, is sexist. The
David."
In a chapter titled, "The audacity of it,' she wailed,
Liberated Grandmother," `saying man cannot live by
Mrs. Seaman dishes out a bread alone.'
"She's right, women
verbal barrage_ at the
women's liberation move- need bread too, but not
ment and the effect it has alone. With a piece of
had both on her and her Muenster cheese." .
It is logic like this that
daughter-in-law, Melanie:
"During the day, Melanie, sets • the Jewish
breathes freely, but on the grandmother apart from
six o'clock news she hears everyone else, making her a
about the high density fuel person who may not be
oils lousing up the air. The unique, but certainly is
air is unacceptable. Is this different.

NY Court Ruling Expected
to Aid Small Congregations

By BEN GALLOB

(Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

NEW YORK — A tax rul-
ing by New York state's
highest court is expected to
help contribute to the via-
bility of newly-established
Jewish congregations and
schools in small-town areas,
according to the National
Commission on Law and
Public Affairs (COLPA).
By a six-to-one decision of
the State Court of Appeals,
religious institutions now
have the assurance they do
not have to own the prop-
erty in which they conduct
their religious programs to
qualify for the "parsonage"
tax exemption for the resi-
dence such institutions pro-
vide for their officiating

clergyman.
The real estate exemption
law specifies that the par-
sonage exemption is "in-
addition to" the tax exemp-
tion for the residence such
institutions provide for
their officiating clergyman.
The real estate exemption
law specifies that the par-
sonage exemption is "in
addition to" the tax exemp-
tion provided for religious
institutions which are used
only for religious purposes.

The first gold star a child
gets in school for the mere
performance of a needful
task is its first lesson in
graft.
—Philip Wylie

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Role of Jewish Grandmother Defined
in Doubleday Volume by a Veteran

A Jewish grandmother
doesn't necessarily have to
be Jewish; nor does she have
to be a grandmother. In fact,
"she" can even be a "he."
That is one of the premises
of the humorous "How to Be
a Jewish Grandmother," by
Sylvia Seaman (Double-
day).
Mrs. Seaman, a "veteran"
Jewish grandmother her-
self, impresses upon the
reader that being Jewish is
only a state of mind. "A
writer these days can't get a
book published unless he's
depicting the sociological
pattern of the Jew in the
American scene. If you
aren't Jewish, you have to
pretend to be," she argues
jokingly.
Mrs. Seaman opens the
book with a brief introduc-
tion of the characters. Not
only does this help clear up
the confusion that is certain
to appear later, when the
reader is trying to decipher
who she is "kvetching about
now," but it also established
the author's sense of humor:
"Winthrop, my son, the
ophthalmologist (that
means eye doctor) mar-
ried to Melanie because
her mother said she has
to marry a doctor.
"Children (all beautiful):
Gerald, Arlene, Shira.
"Jason, my son the
lawyer, married to Cynthia,
the `shiksa.' Because in
every Jewish family one
child these days has to
marry a Gentile. Children
look Gentile, act Jewish.
Noah, Colin.
"Elana, my daughter,
married to Calvin, a college

A time for GUCCI.

-peared, it came as a shock to
the public, because people
all over the world regarded
Holland as having a reputa-
tion for helping Jews and
because, since 1600, when a
Jewish community was es-
tablished in Holland, there
had been no pogroms and no
anti-Semitism.
However, he pointed
out, when the Germans
began persecuting Jews
in Holland, the govern-
ment and people re-
mained passive.
In the summer of 1942,
the Dutch government-in-
exile in London received in-
formation about the regular
deportations of Dutch Jews
to Poland. But it was not
until 18 months later, in
1944, that the Dutch gov-
ernment notified the Polish
government-in-exile. The
offices of both governments
were situated in the same
building in London.
Of the 140,000 Jews in
Holland in 1940, more than
100,000 were murdered by
the Nazis. There are about
30,000 Jews in the country
today.

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