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November 02, 1979 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Burg to Meet Palestinians
After Autonomy Talks

(Continued From Page 1)
protest against a secret
commitment by the Begin
government to annex the
West Bank and Gaza Strip
after the five-year au-
tonomy period.
"Not true," Burg
exclaimed. No such de-
cision has been taken, sl-
ough it is the govern-
ent's attitude that we
have an historic right to
Eretz Yisrael." He also
denied Dayan's charge
that the once moderate
NRP has become a hard-
line extremist party.
Burg conceded that in re-
cent years, some NRP
elements, notably its
youth faction, were very
close to the Gush
Emunim. "But I, person-
ally, representing the
strongest faction in the
party, am middle-of-the-
road," he said, "a little to
the right of national
questions and a little to
the left on social issues."
He denied Dayan's com-
plaint that the Cabinet had
ignored his proposal that Is-
rael unilaterally dismantle
its military government on
the West Bank and Gaza
Strip and replece it by a civi-
lian authority in the event
that the autonomy talks
failed. According to Burg,
Dayan had never made a
formal proposal. He men-
tioned it once or twice in the
Cabinet but he never made
concrete proposals and
never elaborated on them."
Burg said that last week's
ruling by the Israeli Sup-

reme Court that the Gush
Emunim settlement of Elon
Moreh must be removed
from the seized Arab lands
it occupies was not dis-
cussed during the autonomy
talks in London. He said the
high court's decision was a
credit to Israel's democratic
and judicial system but
stressed that it dealt with a
specific issue involving a
particular acreage and loca-
tion "and does not diminish
the right of Jews to settle in
the whole of Eretz Yisrael."
He added, "I don't see in
the question of settlement
an obstacle to a settlement
of the question." He said the
whole idea of autonomy for
the territories was to assure
the peaceful coexistence of
Jews and Arabs west of the
Jordan River. "So we'll have
Arabs living in regions pre-
dominantly inhabited by
Arabs. The mere fact of this
peaceful coexistence will be
an important guarantee
against the emergence of a
Palestinian state," Burg
said.
Dayan also rejected the
Labor Party's territorial
compromise approach
based on a settlement
with Jordan. He quoted
former Foreign Minister
Abba Eban as saying it
was "offering something
we don't have to someone
who doesn't want it."
According to Dayan, "the
best solution . . . the only
solution . . . (is) living to-
gether . ." But he did not
explain what this would
mean in practical terms.

U.S. PLO Policy Outlined

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
The Carter Administra-
tion's position towards the
Palestine Liberation
Organization is reported to
include "contacts" with in-
dividuals who have sym-
pathy with the PLO.
The "Administration's
policy" was stated in a letter
from President Carter's
special Middle East ambas-
sador, Robert Strauss, to
Rep. Lee Hamiltbn (D-Ind.),
chairman of the House
Foreign Affairs subcommit-
tee on Europe and the Mid-
dle East. The letter, dated
Oct. 26, was made public by
Hamilton.
"This Administration has
to an absolute and con-
nt policy of abiding by
agreement made with
the government of Israel at
the time of the Sinai II
agreement in September
1975," the Strauss letters
said. "That agreement
states that the United
States will not recognize nor
negotiate with the PLO so
long as the PLO does not
recognize Israel's right to
exist and does not accept Se-
curity Council Resolutions
242 and 338.
That commitment is
contained in a memoran-
dum of agreement be-
tween the governments
of Israel and_ the United
States at the Geneva
peace conference, which
was transmitted to the
Congress at the time of

are

W

the agreement.
"Let there be no misun-
derstanding of this basic
policy. In the context of the
autonomy talks, as agreed
at Camp David, we — like
the governments of Israel
and Egypt — maintain a
dialogue with the Palesti-
nians in the West Bank and
Gaza as appropriate. This
may include contacts with
individuals who sympathize
with the PLO.
"The PLO itself is cur-
rently proscribed under the
military occupation in the
West Bank and Gaza so
there are no declared PLO
members in the area."
Strauss promised a "very
precise statement" on the
U.S. policy when Hamilton
pointed out to him one week
ago at a subcommittee hear-
ing at which Strauss was
testifying that top officials
of the U.S. government used
different words in describ-
ing U.S. relations with the
PLO. These included
"talks" and "contacts."
Meanwhile, Donald
McHenry, the U.S. ambas-
sador to the United Nations,
said he has had "contacts"
with the PLO itself but he
does not "negotiate" with its
representatives. State De-
partment spokesman Hod-
d-ing Carter, when asked
about this distinction, re-
sponded that the U.S. offi-
cials can have "contacts"
but "to negotiate" is ' "long
affair."

Isarel Accepts
More Refugees

TEL AVIV (JTA) — Is-
rael's small population of
boat people was doubled last
week with the arrival of 197
more refugees approved by
the government for settle-
ment here.
The newcomers landed at
Ben-Gurion Airport in a
flight from Athens. Most
had been confined to refu-
gee camps in Singapore and
Hong Kong. A number were
picked up at sea by the Is-
raeli contaionership Zim
Sydney.

When British troops left
Palestine on the eve of Is-
rael's independence, they

turned over strategic posi-
tions and military materiel
to the Arabs.

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