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September 21, 1979 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

34 Friday, September 21, 1919

Weizman-Saunders Confrontation Over Their
Countries' Foreign Policy Called 'Nothing Much'

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and the Israel Embassy
sought to play down the con-
frontation between Israel
Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman and Assistant
Secretary of State for Mid-
dle East Affairs Harold
Saunders over United
States and Israeli policies.
The confrontation, which
took place at the Israel Em-
bassy Saturday night where
a reception was held with
some newsmen present, was
characterized by an Israeli
spokesman as "nothing
much" and the two "spoke in
quiet tones."
Department
State
spokesman Hodding-Carter
was asked whether the Is-
raeli bombardment of
Palestinian terrorist bases
in South Lebanon, the
cabinet decision to allow Is-
raelis to purchase land in
the administered ter-
ritories, Jewish settlements
in the West Bank and the
U.S. aid program constitute
a rising level of tension that
was symbolized by the ex-
change between Saunders
and Weizman.
"Such sharp exchanges
at 11:30 at night with

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good friends, we don't
consider to be the final
determinant of our stand-
ing as friends," Carter
replied. "We remain close
and friendly. We have dif-
ferences as we have al-
ways had differences. We
continue to work on
those differences. The
differences in no way in-
terfere with the ultimate
stability of our relation-
ship or the depth of it."
Carter said he would not
deal with the details of the
exchange or the "varied re-
ports" about it, but he
acknowledged that "in gen-
eral the thrust of the article
I have seen is relatively ac-
curate."

HAROLD SAUNDERS

Acc6rding to an eye wit-
ness to the confrontation
who took notes, the confron-
tation was initiated by
Saunders, who complained
to Weizman that the U.S.
gives billions of dollars in
aid to Israel, but when he
was in the Middle East he
was not informed about the
Egyptian-Israeli moves to
establish joint Egyptian-
Israeli patrols in the Sinai
in place of the United Na-
tions Emergency Force.
When Saunders
suggested that the failure
he spoke of did not consti-
tute friendship, Weizman
replied, "you are talking of
friendship. You are making
us to appear as villians in
Southern Lebanon." Weiz-
man also wanted to know,
"where were you when the
children were being killed
in Maalot?"
Saunders said that "all
you know is bombing,"
and added, that is not
our kind of policy."
Weizman wondered what
U.S. policy is and Saun-
ders said that "you are
making the same mistake
that the U.S. made in
going to Vietnam."
Weizman replied that "if
there will be another
Katyusha (Soviet rocket) or
something else that will
hurt us we will act se-
verely." When Saunders
said, "you will continue
bombing," Weizman re-
plied: "I did not say bomb-
ing. I want to remind yeti we
went into Lebanon and
stayed there several weeks
until we accomplished what
we had to do."
Weizman reportedly also
told Saunders that the U.S.
was not being Israel's friend
by assailing Israeli air
strikes against terrorist

bases in South Lebanon.
°47-20"

EZER WEIZMAN

Saunders then charged
that Israel was using too
much military force in
Lebanon. Weizman re-
sponded, "don't lecture us
on what to do." He then re-
ferred to the U.S. display of
weakness and vacillation in
foreign affairs, noting the
position toward Cuba,
which led the non-aligned
nations meeting in Havana
in condemning the U.S. and
again equating Zionism
with Racism. Saunders re-
portedly responded, at
least we are not bombing
there."

(Reports
from
Washington Wednesday
said that Weizman and
Saunders reconciled their
differences.)
Meanwhile, Rep. Paul
Findley (R-I11.) said that
Weizman had promised
that Israel would consult
with the U.S. before
launching any new pre-
emptive strikes against
Lebanon
American-supplied
weapons.
Findley said Weizman
authorized him to disclose
that pledge, made at an off-
the-record meeting with
members of the Foreign Af-
fairs Committee. According
to the Congressman, the Is:-
raeli defense chief told him
that "if Israel in the future
should find it necessary to
use U.S.-supplied military
equipment in any pre-
emptive strikes it would
first talk with the United
States." Findley, who has
called for an inquiry into Is-
rael's use of American
equipment in Lebanon, said
Weizman's promise rep-
resented "a significant and
gratifying change in Israel's
military policy."

Vance Voices Optimism
Over Camp David Accords

WASHINGTON (JTA) —
Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance said on the first an-
niversary of the signing of
the Camp David agree-
ments that the "commit-
ments made one year ago
are being carried out
scrupulously."
He said, in a prepared
statement issued at the
State Department, that "the
world can see the practical
results that have been
achieved" and that as the
Egyptian-Israeli relations
"mature it will demonstrate
that agreement will be
kept."

The secretary called on
"all who seek aid cherish
peace to join with us" to
"build on the solid foun-
dation laid at Camp
David." The Camp David
accords were signed at
the White House Sept. 17,
1978, by President Anwar
Sadat of Egypt, Premier
Menahem Begin of Israel
with President Carter as
a witness.
Vance's statement was is-
sued prior to a ceremony at
the White House marking
the first anniversary of the
Camp David accords.
President Carter, Vance
and National Security Ad-
viser Zbigniew Brzezinski
represented the U.S. at the
ceremony.
Israel was represented by
Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan and Defense Minis-
ter Ezer Weizman and
Egypt by Vice President
Hosni Mubarak and De-
fense Minister Kamal Has-
san Ali.

Oil Policy Asked

CYRUS VANCE

Vance noted also that "it
will show not only that
peace can be achieved, but
that it can last." He said
that "for the first time in the
more than 30-year-old
Israeli-Arab conflict, a
mechanism exists for be-
ginning to resolve the issues
of concerns to the Palesti-
nians" and that the current
negotiations "to provide the
full autonomy for the in-
habitants of the West Bank
and Gaza are gaining
momentum."

NEW YORK —
American Jewish Commit-
tee has urged the U.S. to
broaden its definition of
"heavy crude" oil to make
the production of such oil
commercially feasible.
In written testimony
submitted to the U.S. De-
partment of Energy, Harris
L. Kempner Jr., chairman
of ACJ's National Commit-
tee on Energy, also urged
the U.S. to encourage the
production of refined heavy
crude oil by non-OPEC oil-
producing nations.

He becometh poor that
dealeth with a slack hand.

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