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August 24, 1979 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-08-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, August 24, 1979 21

Actor Burns in Going in Style'

By HERBERT G. LUFT

(Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

HOLLYWOOD — "Going
in Style" is the title of a new
Warner Bros. movie with
George Burns, Lee Stras-
berg and Art Carney as a
trio of lovable senior citi-
zens who decide there must
be more to life than just
growing old gracefully. The
thought-provoking comedy
is being produced by Tony
Bill (himself a former actor
who portrayed the juvenile
lead in "Come Blow Your
Horn" as the son of Molly
Picon) and Fred T. Gallo (an
alumnus of three Woody
Allen films as assistant di-
rector).
Martin Brest makes his
debut as a feature film di-
rector after studying at the
American Film Institute.
The current picture was
filmed mainly in New York.
The three men join together
to come out of retirement.
They are Joe, an ex-
salesman (Burns); Willie, a
former taxi. cab driver
(Strasberg), and an ex-
singing bartender (Carney).
Tired of wiling away the
rest of their years sitting
day-by-day in the park and
watching TV at night, the
feisty trio decides that they
could do better than collect-
ing Social Security benefits.
Leaving their shabby
apartments, they set out
on a unique and hilarious
adventure that takes
them to places they never
dreamed of before. And
amid laughter, the movie
takes a serious look at
growing old in America.
Burns is in a class by him-
self as star of almost 50
years in vaudeville, on radio
and television, with occa-
sional spots in motion pic-
tures, but only as himself, in
such earlier talkies as "In-
ternational House," "Col-
lege Swing," "Honolulu"
and "Two Girls and a
Sailor.", The oldest among
the three, he is by far the
most energetic of the ram-
bunctious trio, sandwiching
into the strenuous routine
of appearing, -at the age of
83, on the set at 6 a.m., a
"live" appearance at the
Hotel Casino in Atlantic
City in a show that lasted
long past midnight.
Nathan Birnbaum be-
came George Burns when
appearing as straight man
to Gracie Allen's scatter-
brained character on radio
and television.
After his wife Gracie died,
he went on alone with his
specific comedy routines
characterized by his desire
to become a song-and-dance
man who fails. A smash hit
on the nightclub circuit and
in the concert halls, with
guest appearances on
numerous talk shows, he
also went into TV commer-
cials and continues to do so.
When his life-long
friend Jack Benny died
unexpectedly, George
replaced him on the sc-
reen in Neil Simon's "The
Sunshine Boys" and was
nominated for an "Os-
car" for his very first
dramatic motion picture
part.

He has since starred in
"Oh God!" with John De-
nver at his side; he was the
singing mayor in "Sgt. Pep-
per's Lonely Hearts Club
Band" and now appears in
Columbia Pictures' "Just
.You and Me, Kid" with 14-
year-old Brooke Shields as
his "romantic" interest.
George Burns has long-
term commitments, next
commencing photography
on "Oh, God — Part 2" and
joining Ann-Margret in a
TV spectacular, among
other goodies.
Lee Strasberg is one of the
founders of the Group Thea-
ter in the 1930s and for
many years was artistic di-
rector of New York's Actors
Studio (now on the West
Coast) whose graduates in-
clude such luminaries as
Marlon Brando, Julie Har-
ris, Geraldine Page, Dustin
Hoffman and Al Pacino.
Past the age of 70, he
made his screen debut as a
gangster in "The Godfather
II," promptly winning an
Academy Award nomina-
tion. In quick succession he
appeared in the star-
studded "The Cassandra
Crossing"; opposite Ruth
Gordon in "Boardwalk,"
and with Al Pacino in "And
Justice for All" (the latter
two still unreleased).
He made his TV bow in
the ABC Movie of the Week,
"The Last Tenant." In the
new film, Strasberg reduces
his flamboyant personality
to a retired cab driver with a
sensitive but adventurous
spirit.
Art Carney made his
name in show business
with two popular TV
series, "The Jackie
Gleason Show" and "The
Honeymooners," with
the Emmy award-
winning role of sewer
man Ed Norton.
On the stage, Carney
starred in "The Rope Dan-
cers" and Neil Simon's "The

Pesach Customs
Charted by Rabbi

NEW YORK — The late
Rabbi Shemtob Gaguine
served as Ecclestiastical
Chief of the Spanish and
Portuguese Jews Congrega-
tions of England and
authored a number of vol-
umes entitled "Keter Shem
Tob" which deal with differ-
ent customs among the var-
ious groups of Sephardim.
Some Pesach customs in-
clude: The Egyptian ritual
of celebrating weddings on
the eve of Passover; The
London custom of celebrat-
ing a siyyum mesikhta,
which, in recent years has
fallen into destitude; and a
Moroccan custom in which
the first-born go to a place
where there will be a cele-
bration of the mitzva of
circumcision on that day,
freeing themselves from
fasting.

One ORT project,
Scholarship for Teachers'
Training, takes the most
promising ORT students,
trains them for teaching
jobs and places them in the
ORT network.

Odd Couple" and "The Pris-
oner of Second Avenue." In
"Harry and Tonto" he
netted an Academy Award
as an aging father who
breaks out of his environ-
ment of despair. He received
top billing in the film, "The
Late Show," depicted the
antagonist to Walter
Matthau in "House Calls"
and was seen in the CBS-TV
dramatization of Kaufman
& Hart's "You Can't Take it
With You."

* *

WE WON'T LOSE A
CUSTOMER OVER PRICE!

*

JOEY BISHOP ap-
peared with Danny
Thomas, Rabbi Edgar Mag-
nin and a host of show biz
personalities on the St. Jude
dinner-dance for the benefit
of the Children's Research
HospitalFoundation which,
at its clinic in Memphis,
Tenn., is attempting a
breakthrough in the detec-
tion and cure of lukemia
and other forms of cancer.
The event took place at the
Beverly Hilton and was
non-sectarian, with
Lebanese-Catholic Danny
Thomas reciting the
"braha" in Hebrew.

TamaRoFF

Buick Opel Honda

353-1300.28585 Telegraph

Across from Tel-1 2 Mall — Near 12 Mile
Out of town calls accepted. Open Mon. & Thurs. til 9 p.m.

DETROIT EDISON OFFERS EIGHT IMPORTANT
TIPS TO HELP YOU GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR
AIR CONDITIONER THIS SUMMER.

Fortunately, Detroit Edison customers have
plenty of electric power available. Now and in
the future. It's the result of planning, develop-
ment and investment and the fact that over 84
percent of Detroit Edison's power is generated

1

Pull down shades and close
draperies to keep out the
hot `sun.

Keep your air conditioner
on a moderate setting.
• When leaving home, set the
temperature higher.

Shade windows from
outside with ventilated
awnings, solar screens,
trees or shrubs.

4

from coal, the nation's most abundant fuel.
The balance is generated from other fossil fuels.
Even so, none of us should waste energy So
follow these tips and stay cool and comfortable
all summer long.

5

Keep air filter, coils, regis-
ters and return ducts clean.

3

Be careful not to block the
flow of cool air.

Flush out hot attic air
with a powered ventilator.

4,

`MODEL NUMBER
ACR2.0874F

VOLTS I CYCLE PHASE
115
60
1

7

Use heat and humidity-
producing appliances —
such as your oven, washer
and dryer — early in the morning
or in the evening.

KEEPING THE POWER
IN YOUR HANDS

Detroit

If you're buying a new air
conditioner, you'll save
electricity if you select one
with an energy efficiency rating
(EER) of 8 or higher. The EER is
figured by dividing the BTUs by
the watts.

Edison



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