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August 10, 1979 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

40 Friday, August 10, 1919

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Vision looks inward
and becomes duty. Vision
looks outward and becomes
aspiration. Vision looks
upward and becomes faith.
—Stephen S. Wise.

INVITATIONS?
Hattie Schwartz



Of Course!

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DISCO NORTH?

Seymour Schwartz

— Of Course!

356-8525

Agudath Hosts
17,000 Campers

NEW YORK — A record
17,000 children are par-
ticipating in various pro-
grams at 55 summer all-day
and sleepaway camps oper-
ated by the international
Agudath Israel movement.
The vacation retreats,
most of which bear the
name Camp Agudah (for
boys) or Camp Bnos (for
girls) are located in New
York, California, Illinois,
Ohio, Montreal, Toronto,
Argentina, England, Israel,
Belgium, Switzerland and
Italy.

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M-S 10-5

Reflections on the Passing Parade

By DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

Speaking about the 10th
anniversary of man's land-
ing on the moon, one of the
scientists connected with
the space work foresees in
the not too distant future
man actively engaged in
various forms of space ac-
tivity. There are many
things which can be done in
space which cannot be done
on earth, he says. The only
lack up there, he declares, is
air.
* * *
All men are created
equal, Americans say. Sam
Levinson has changed that
a bit. Commenting on the
nuclear incident in Three
Mile Island, Pa., Levinson
says, We will all be cre-
mated equally."
Levinson, one of the es-
tablished humorists of the
country, is the author of a
new book with the title:
"You Don't Have to Be in
Who's Who to Know What's
What."
The thesis of the work
is that ordinary people
are not so dumb either.
Benjamin Franklin had
the same idea. He said
that there are as many
able people who are not
known as there are who
are known and cele-
brated.

If you decide to get born, a
good place to do it is Kiev. It
was there that Golda Meir
was born. Also Louise
Nevelson.
Louise Nevelson, who
came to America from Kiev,
Russia when she was a
child, is now regarded as
perhaps the leading
sculptress in America. Her
parents settled in Rockport,
Maine and there she spent
her childhood. She wasn't
very much appreciated in
Maine, but now that she is
famous, they are making up
for it. Last month, the city of
Rockport turned out in full
force to honor her with par-
ties and exhibitions of her
work. Who knows, they may
even name a street after
her. In New York, it has al-
ready been done: Louise
Nevelson Plaza.

Members of her family
attribute her success to her
indomitable spirit. You
just couldn't keep her
down, they say. She still
works all day, but she be-
lieves in relaxing too. At
night, she likes to go danc-
ing. After all, she is only a
little more than 80 years
old.

* * *

Seymour
Rabbi
Schwartz of Parkchester
in the Bronx, is a man

Adjustment Is the Theme
of Two New Summer Books

Henry Denker's latest
novel, "Horowitz and Mrs.
Washington," (G.P. Put-
nam's Sons) centers, at first,
on two fiercely independent
and uncompromising indi-
viduals, but, in the end,
takes on a meaning much
larger in scope.
Samuel Horowitz is the
fiesty old man living alone
on New York's upper West
Side. He is so hard headed
and stubborn that he puts
up a fight when he is at-
tacked by muggers and suf-
fers a stroke which
paralyzes his entire left
side.
Horowitz's son hires a
black nurse, Mrs. Washing-
ton, to supervise the physi-
cal therapy and Horowitz
becomes furious.
Slowly and grudgingly,
Horowitz grows to re-
spect Mrs. Washington.
He finds that she is, after
all, a decent woman (and
besides, she makes great
blintzes; one of
Horowitz's favorite dis-
hes).
Eventually, the two corn-
bine forces to save Horowitz
from his daughter, who
plans to move Horowitz
from his beloved New York.

bara Fischman Traub
(Richard Marek Pub-
lishers).
The story centers
around 17-year-old Lisa
Engler, who is among the
few Jewish survivors
who return home to the
Romanian town of Sighet
at the end of the war. De-
vastated by the loss of
their families and the
things they have seen in
the camps, the survivors
hope to find comfort in
the familiar contours of
home. Instead, they find
their houses destroyed
and their non-Jewish
neighbors sorry that they
survived and returned.
The novel follows Lisa
through a life in which she
is both shattered by her los-
ses and braced for the future
by the moral integrity she
finds within herself.

Righteous Gentile
Cited for Efforts

WEST BERLIN — A
West German woman who
hid a Jewish woman and her
daughter in her Berlin
home during World War II
has received a $1,000 check
from a New York attorney.
The check was sent after the
Thus, "Horowitz and Mrs. attorney read a newspaper
Washington" becomes a article about the incident.
story of the triumph of hu-
Emma Gumz and her late
manity and understanding husband risked their lives
over loneliness and prej- to protect Inge Deutschkron
udice.
and her mother for three
* * *
years during the war.
Of Berlin's 160,000 Jews,
The return of concentra-
tion camp survivors to their only an estimated 5,000
native lands and to the were able to live out the war
mainstream of life is the within the city. An esti-
subject of "The Matrushka mated 60,000 perished in
Doll," a new novel by Bar- the Nazi death camps.

know quite the contrary. In
"der erd" now, we know,
there is the oil. When Jews
said that, they really
meant, go find some oil.
* * *
We never felt too reas-
sured _about permanent
peace between Israel and
Egypt until the other day,
when we read that Sadat,
on Begin's recent visit to
Egypt, called him by his
first name.
People who call each
other by their first names
can't be enemies. If we coul(
SAM LEVINSON
get people the world over tc
who deserves a" noble do that we could abolish the
prize, if not the Nobel armies.
But we were a little wor-
Prize. He started some-
thing really worthwhile. ried in this case. It is easy
Like many other areas, for Sadat to say Menahem,
many of the people of but Sadat's first name
Parkchester are afraid to seems to present more diffi-
go out at night because of culty. Anwar el Sadat is his
the great increase in name. Somehow it doesn't
crime. So what did Rabbi sound right to call anyone
Schwartz do? He insti- Anwar. It would have been
tuted a community walk. better if Sadat's first name
Every Thursday night, was Joe or Mike.
all the people of
Parkchester can join in
FIRESTONE
the walk.
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L ino • commis •
general community spirit.
It is the absence of wal-
For the Finest
kers, it seems to me, that is
largely responsible for the
Wedding and
increase of crime. The mug-
ger is a cowardly person. He
Bar Mitzva Album
will not go where there are
many people. His cowardice
Call
is further shown by the fact
that he prefers to choose old
people for his victims.
** *
People used to think that
"geh in der erd" was a
357-1010
Jewish curse, but now we

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