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August 10, 1979 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-08-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

(Women's Club;1

ISRAEL CHAPTER,
Pioneer Women, will honor
new members and their
sponsors at a dessert lunch-
eon 1 p.m. Aug. 18 at the
Labor Zionist Institute.
Greater Detroit Council
President Ruth Miller will
be guest speaker. Pianist
Rosalyn Kraus will
entertain. For membership
information, call Lee Wag-
man, 967-3257; or Fan Bu-
nin, 646-5337.

LADIES
OF
ESHIVATH BETH
YEHUDAH AND
WOMEN'S SABBATH
LEAGUE will hold a
luncheon-meeting noon
Wednesday at the yeshiva
building. Discussion will
center on arrangements for
the Oct. 24 donor luncheon.
Sponsoring the luncheon-
meeting are Mrs. Isaac
Mandel in memory of her
daughter and Bertha
Goodman in memory of her
husband. President Mrs.
Leo Laufer invites guests.

* * *

CHANA CZENESH
Pioneer
CHAPTER,
Women, will meet noon
Monday in the Lincoln To-
wers Apts. club room. Ruth
Miller will speak on
"Holocaust, Beginning or
End?" Refreshments will be
served. Guests are welcome.

secretaries; and Esther
Lisner, treasurer. Beverly
Hacker was named sister-
hood member of the year
"for her outstanding in-
volvement in sisterhood
actvities." The women will
hold a board meeting 7:30
p.m. Monday at the
synagogue.

* * *

DIMONA CHAPTER
will have a luncheon meet-
ing 12:15 p.m. Tuesday in
the home of Frieda Faigin,
22855 Nottingham Ln •,
Southfield. Dorothy Cohen
will speak on "Life in the
Cults." There is a charge.
For information, call Mrs.
Faigin, 356-7119; or Elaine
Kohner, 851-3662.

* * *

SHALOM
CHAI
CHAPTER,
Pioneer
Women, will have a special
luncheon-meeting noon
Wednesday at the North-
gate Apts. club house. Lil-
lian Lublin and Rae
Freeman will be honored
"for their spiritual adop-
tions and for their dedica-
tion to Israel." Guests are
welcome.

Stollman-Luger
Vows Exchanged

* * *

WHITEHALL-CHAI
Pioneer
CHAPTER,
Women, will meet noon
Monday in the Whitehall
Apts. club house. Hostesses
will be Eva Epstein and
Anne Gerber. Guests are
welcome and refreshments
will be served.

* * *

DAVID-HORODOKER
WOMEN'S ORGANIZA-
TION will meet noon Tues-
day at the Maple House
Restaurant, Southfield and
10 Mile Roads. Hostesses
are Sarah Figlen and Ethel
Hackman.

* * *

MRS. LUGER

Lea Andrea Stollman,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Stollman of Oak
Park, recently became the
bride of Richard Michael
Luger, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Daniel Luger of
Mamaroneck, N.Y.

CLUB ONE, Pioneer
Women, will meet noon
Wednesday in the Lincoln
Towers Apts. club room.
The donor will be discussed.
A cultural program will fol-
Their vows were ex-
low. For information, call
changed at Cong. Bnai
Chana Michlin, 968-5351.
* * *
Moshe, with Rabbi Stanley
SPRING ARBOR M. Rosenbaum and Cantor
Women's Louis Klein officiating.
CHAPTER,
The couple are residing in
American ORT, will hold its
fall membership tea and in- Oak Park.
stallation of officers 8 p.m.
'lg. 22 at Franklin Pointe Melody Musicale
pts. club house. Sharon Installs Officers
Hart, president of Michigan
Florence Malach was in-
Region, Women's American
ORT, will be installing offi- stalled as president of
cer. For reservations, call Melody Musicale at its re-
Deborah Hitsky, 541-6633; cent installation of officers.
Other officers are: Jackie
or Judy Chupack, 661-2571.
* * *
Rogers and Florence Meitis,
BETH ACHIM SIS- secretaries; Celia Goodman,
TERHOOD installed Sha- treasurer; Tillie Nadler,
ron Leeman as president at historian; Rhoda Wallace,
its mother-daughter ban- program chairman; Irma
quet. Other officers are Pasik and Zelda Keil, pub-
Elizabeth Cantor, Marcia licity; Gloria Siporin, sun-
Davis and Judy Phillips, shine chairman and Ruth
vice presidents; Mary Katzman, telephone chair-
Sugarman, Sandy Rubin, man.
Persons interested in
Arlene Burlant, Miriam
Cohen, Maxine Stoler, joining the group should
Phyllis Subar, Harriet call Ms. Malach, 569-3874;
Kruger and Beverly Mitz, or Mrs. Rogers, 557-4259.

Friday, August 10, 1919 35

Broomfield Would Kill MFN for Romania

Rep. William S. Broom-
field (R-Mich.), the ranking
Republican on the House
International Relations
Committee, has released a
statement criticizing the
Carter Administration's
continued backing of Most
Favored Nation trade
status for Romania.
Rep. Broomfield said,
"The Administration's 'hu-
man rights' cornerstone
seems to be unusually soft
for it often crumbles under
weighty foreign policy ques-
tions.
"This cornerstone crum-
bled once again when the
Administration vigorously
opposed a bill before the
House of Representatives
which would have revoked
trading status from to-
talitarian Romania. This
unsuccessful bill, which I
supported, would have pro-
vided substance to our na-
tion's human rights dec-
larations.
"Four years ago,
Romania became the first
Communist nation to re-
ceive MFN status. At that
time, Romania had dis-
played a strong spirit of
independence from
Soviet domination, and it
was hoped that this
would encourage other
nations in Eastern
Europe.
"In return for this favored
status and millions of dol-
lars in credits, Romania
gave its solemn pledge to
live up to our country's
`freedom of emigration' re-
quirements, and to imple-
ment the requirements of
the Helsinki Accords on
human rights which it
signed.
"Instead, we have wit-
nessed an increase in the
level of oppression and in
the number of barriers to
emigration after granting
MFN status.
"We have received re-
peated assurances that
Romania would change its
policy, and we have seen
these assurances violated
repeatedly.
"We have seen the
forced assimilation of
Romania's second
largest ethnic group — its
21/2 million Hungarians.
There have been well-
documented reports of a
systematic effort to de-
stroy a whole network of
Hungarian cultural in-
stitutions in order to dep-
rive this ethnic group of
its language, traditions,
and cultural identity.
"Beyond this, the Hunga-
rian population has been
subject to official harass-
ment and discrimination
that makes their lives one of
despair.
We have seen the con-
tinuation of government
forced labor camps where
political and religious pris-
oners and prisoners of con-
science are incarcerated,
controlled, and politically
`re-educated' through drugs
and electro-shock treat-
ments.
"We have witnessed the
numbers of emigrants
allowed to leave
Romania for Israel and

other countries steadily
decline during the years
of MFN status.
"Prior to receiving MFN
status, as many as 4,000
people per year were
allowed to emigrate. In
1978, this number had
dwindled to less than 1,200
people, and so far this year,
less than 300 people have
been able to emigrate from
Romania.
"Further, the barriers to
emigration have steadily
increased in direct violation
of the Helsinki Accords.
Once, only an application
for emigration was needed.
Now, pre-application forms
are required with requisite
waiting periods which in-
crease the time a person can
be subject to harassment,
intimidation and punitive
action.
"The House of Represen-
tatives' refusal to revoke
the MFN status from
Romania will make this the
fourth year in a row that the
House has accepted the as-
surances of the Romanian
government that it will
change its policy on human
rights. Romania's recent
history has shown other-
wise . ."
Meanwhile, Leon Dul-
zin; chairman of the
World Zionist Organiza-
tion and Jewish Agency
Executives, contends
there has been "a change
for the better in
Romania's promises" re-
garding the free emigra-
tion of Romanian Jews to
Israel.
There are an estimated
40,000 Jews still living in
Romania, out of a post-war
total of 400,000. Almost

350,000 have gone to Israel
over the years and thus al-
most all of those who still
remain have relations or
friends in Israel. Part of the
heavy Israeli tourism to
Romania each summer
comprises former Roma-
nians visiting relatives, and
there is some Jewish tourist
traffic, though restricted, in
the other direction.
According to Dulzin, who
just returned from
Romania, one-third of the
Jews in Romania actively
want and intend to immig-
rate to Israel. Another third
would consider the move
but the remainder cannot,
because of age, infirmity or
other reasons.
The Minister of Reli-
gions of the Romanian
government assured
Dulzin that the proce-
dures for applying for
exit visas would hence-
forth be simplified. Dul-
zin accordingly urged the
Jews wherever he went
to make applications —
repeated applications if
necessary — and in this
way put the govern-
ment's pledges to the test.
Meanwhile, Dulzin in-
formed Romanian officials
that the WZO had, when
asked for advice, told U.S.
Jewish organizations that
in its view Romania did de-
serve most-favored-nation
trade status. This advice
was apparently given on the
basis of past statistics and

the promises of a change in
present restrictions on
emigration.
Dulzin had praise for his
host, Chief Rabbi Moshe
Rosen, to whom he ascribes
the impressive religious
organization of the Roma-
nian community which has
ritual slaughterers and
kosher restaurants in many
cities, synagogues and He-
brew classes, burial
societies and other institu-
tions.
Romania,. said Dulzin,
has one of the best-run na-
tional Jewish communities
anywhere — and this was
almost entirely thanks to
Rosen.
The Jewish Agency has
undertaken to send to
Romania five religious offi-
cials to keep .up religious
services and practices in the
outlying communities, Dul-
zin said. "It is a real holy
mission to go out there for a
year or two," he remarked.

SAM
BARNETT

IMPORTER AND CUTTERS
OF FINE DIAMONDS

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OUR 39th ANNUAL
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