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June 22, 1979 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

24 Friday, June 22, 1919

Pope Thanked for Holocaust Victim Tribute

TEL AVIV (JTA) — The
Federation of Polish Jews
has expressed its "profound
appreciation" and thanks to
Pope John Paul II for his

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compassionate words about
the Holocaust victims when
he was at Auschwitz during
his visit to Poland.
The Pope, viewing the
Hebrew inscription on the
memorial wall at the former
Nazi death camp, con-
demned the murder of mil-
lions, including Jews, and
the destruction of the
world-famous spiritual
creativity in the tragedy
that befell Polish Jewry and
the Jewish people of the
entire world.
The American Jewish
Committee also sent a cable
to Pope John Paul II prais-
ing him for his remarks

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about the Jewish victims at
Auschwitz.
At Auschwitz, the
Pope, accompanied by
nearly half a million
people, celebrated a sol-
emn mass at an open air
altar between the railway
lines which once brought
Jews from all over
Europe to the gas cham-
bers of the twin death
camps.
At Birkenau, about a mile
away from Auschwitz, the
Pope donned his vestments
in the blockhouse where SS
officers once watched their
victims being chosen for the
gas chambers.
In New York, the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising memorial
service held at Temple
Emanu-El in New York, has
drawn a warm response
from Pope John Paul II, the
Warsaw Ghetto Resistance
Organization (WAGRO) re-
ported.
WAGRO President
Benjamin Meed, who had
written to the Pope about
the event, received a let-
ter conveying the Pon-
tiffs acknowledgement.
It stated that "In the
April 22 commemoration of
the uprising of his Jewish
fellow countrymen the Holy
Father sees a reminder of
the need to safeguard at all
times the objective and in-
violable rights of every

human being. His Holiness.
prays that through the
commemoration many will
be inspired with such an
attitude and he invokes
God's blessings on their
work for the good of all."
Meed, whose organiza-
tion organized the annual
Warsaw Ghetto memorial,
said the Pope's understand-
ing and compassion for the
remembrance of the Jewish
victims of the Holocaust
was a significant develop-
ment in Catholic-Jewish re-
lations which, he hoped,
"will serve as a memoran-
dum for history."
Meanwhile, an article by
Tad Szule in New York
Times Magazine contains
new facts about Pope John
Paul II's friendly feelings
towards Jews.
"His childhood friend
Kluger, for example, re-
members that when anti-
Semitic thugs in Wadowice
tried to attack Jewish stu-
dents, Wojtyla came to their
defense. In wartime
Kracow, the future Pope
made a point of taking out a
Jewish girl on dates to pro-
tect her from harassment.
His close friends are con-
vinced that Wojtyla thought
of himself as an escort, and
that there was no romantic
involvement. Her identity
is a well-kept secret to this
day."

June Is Yarmulke Month

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By DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

June is the "yarmulke"
month. If you don't believe
it, go down to Hester Street
on New York's Lower East
Side, the center of the yar-
mulke industry. If you are
out of employment, you can
at least get temporary em-
ployment there at this
period. It is in June that the
yarmulke demand is at its
height.
Yarmulkes, of course, are
worn at other times of the
year too. Recently,
President Carter in Israel
was shown wearing one —
but at weddings they are an
essential and June is the
most popular month for
marrying.
Hats may come and go but
the yarmulke has stayed for
a long time. One reason
perhaps is because it is so
small and light. It can easily
be carried on one pocket.
But along with the practical
considerations there are the
higher reasons.
If you put on a cowboy
hat, you get the feeling
that you are in Arizona
and you look about for a
horse. If you put on a
yarmulke, the prosaic
and business world van-
ishes from your mind.
You get a spiritual feeling
or that someone around
you has found the object
of his love. There is no
mandate for wearing a
yarmulke. But as the old
Jewish saying has it, '
"minhag brecht a din," a
custom transcends a law.
The business of marrying
in June itself also is a cus-
tom. Among Jews of old,

oddly enough, the great day
of love was Yom Kippur. It
was the custom among the
Jews of old for the young
women on Yom Kippur to
gather in front of the
synagogue and dance.
All the girls borrowed
clothes. This was to give the
poor girls an even break
with the rich. The young
men stood around looking
on and before the stars came
out on Yom Kippur, mark-
ing the end of the fast, many
had found their future
mates.
It seems incongruous that
the most awesome of the
holidays should be chosen
for love and yet there was
good sense and practical
logic behind it for Yom Kip-
pur brought . the maximum
attendance at the
synagogue, so that one had
the widest possible choice.
Also, perhaps it is best to
make one's choice of love
partner on an empty
stomach. If you pledge your
troth after a good dinner,
you can't be sure it wasn't
the steak or the cakes that
did it, but when you choose
on an empty stomach, you
know that gastronomy did
not enter into it. The Day of
Atonement becomes a day of
At-one-ment .

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NEW YORK — American
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winning television talk
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with the coveted AMW
Humanities Award "for
consistently high standards
in television broadcasting."

Enjoy Your Aleph Bet

By HERZL SHUR

As Jewish Children, you'll never fret
To learn your ALEPH-BET.
They certainly stand solid,
Yes, the Gimmel and the Da-led.
If you want to become a Ray,
Be sure to practice on your Hay and Vav!
The day will come around when you will say Yes,
I know my Za-yin and I know my Hes.
As long as you're good and in a fair mood,
You'll master your Tes and also your Yood.
If you are patient and listen to the Meh-la-med,
You'll know your Kof and you'll know your La-med.
Look at your Mem, look at your Noon,
If you can't get it now, you're bound to get it soon.
The Sa-mekh and the Ah-yin they're not hard to remember.

If you can't grasp them in November, you'll know them
in December.
It won't be long and you'll be shouting Hooray!
It's easy as pie to say Pay and Fay.
Study your Tzadik and study your Koof,
If you study a little each day, it won't be so tough!
Next we come to the Raysh and Shin,
Just perk yourself up and lift up your chin!
To stop right here would be a terrible Sin
So let's say Tof and Sof, which is really quite enough!

Boris Smolar's

`Between You
. . . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA
' (Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

MEET YOUR LEADER: One may believe in
"Women's Lib" and one may not, but NYANA, the New
York Association for New Americans — the largest agency
outside of Israel for the resettlement of Jewish refugees
from the Soviet Union and other countries of oppression —
finds women equal in ability to men in top leadership.
NYANA, which has resettled 185,000 Jewish refugees
since its establishment in New York 30 years ago— includ-
ing 16,000 from the Soviet Union during the last 10 years
— had as its first president the late, venerated Mrs. Adele
Levy, who like her father, the great philanthropist Julius
Rosenwald, was deeply devoted to Jewish needs. She was
succeeded by men for a period of 20 years. But since 1971
the NYANA presidency has been held by women. The new
president, elected last month, is also a woman. She is Dr.
Sylvia N. Friedman.
A practicing psychotherapist who received her docto-
rate in psychology from Fordham University, Dr. Fried-
man has been treasurer of NYANA and member of the
executive of its board of directors, as well as active in the
United Jewish Appeal and in the Natoinal Council of
Jewish Women. She has also been a delegate to the Jewish
Agency assemblies in Israel. She is active in various com-
mittees of the Council of Jewish Federations. She has been
deeply interested in Jewish emigration from the Soviet
Union for many years.
NYANA is now known primarily for its activities of
resettling Soviet Jews in New York which abosrbs most of
the newcomers. But during the 30 years of its existence it
has resettled waves of immigrants which included also
thousands of Displaced Jews, Greek Jews, Cuban Jews,
Cze- ch Jews, Polish Jews, Syrian Jews, and is now reset-
tling, in addition to Jews from the Soviet Union, Iranian
Jews.
The U.S. government, impressed with NYANA's sys-
tem, has asked for the agency's assistance to the State
Department in the emergency resettlement of Ugandans in
1972, Vietnamese in 1975, and Chinese-descent Viet-
namese "boat people" in 1979. A beneficiary of the National
UJA and of the Joint UJA-Federation drive in New York,
NYANA will now receive also federal funds to meet the
costs of its expert services.
PROBLEMS AND PROGRESS: In assuming the
presidency of NYANA, Dr. Friedman will face greater obli-
gations than ever in the history of the agency. Last year,
NYANA spent more than $7 million assisting 5,200 new-
comers. This year — when the largest Jewish immigration
from the Soviet Union is anticipated — the agency's case-
load may increase to 12,000.
Inflation will, of course, also present a major problem
for the new president. Six years ago, resettlement of a
family of four, until they became self-sufficient, averaged
$1,500. This year, the average cost is already $5,200-plus;
by year's end it may go up.
NYANA's basic services include financial assistance
for food, housing, utilities, furnishings, household equip-
ment, medical and dental care, children's day care, work
tools, intensive English instruction, skill evaluation and
career planning, scholarships, vocational training, job
guidance and placement.

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