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June 01, 1979 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4-0E466 4WISH NEWS

26 Friday, June 1, 1919 —

Danny Raskin's

LISTENING
POST

BIGGIE EVENT of the
year is June 14 . . . when the
Children's Leukemia Foun-
dation of Michigan has its
annual theater party.
A premier benefit per-
formance of the movie
"Rocky II" starring Sylves-
ter Stallone is set for the
Northland Theater on J.L.
Hudson Dr.. . . Afterwards,
honoring Northland Cen-
ter's 25th anniversary, will
be an afterglow for pur-
chasers of patron, sponsor
and benefactor tickets.
CLF is the only agency of
its kind in the state dedi-
cated to all serious blood
disease patients 1Mng in
Michigan . . . It helps any-
one, child or adult, with any
of the many blood diseases.
Most of the volunteer-
hard workers have been
touched by a serious
blood disease, either a
family member or good
friend, making the work
most heartfelt.
For example Harriet and
Jack Goldberg of Stage Del-
icatessen . . . They lost a
daughter 10 years ago from
Hodgkins Disease and are
among the volunteers who
work very diligently to find
a cure so that Others will not
suffer as they did.
Theater party chairper-
sons are . . . Harriet and
Jack, Sharyn and Alan
Cornfield and Pat and Joe
Belanger . . . If folks want
ticket information, call the
Stage . . . LI 8-1111 or LI
1-2888.
Children's Leukemia
Foundation is a very won-
derful organization . . . and
certainly deserves all the
support you can give.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Couples White Elephant
Sale is 9 a.m. this Sunday
. . . Last week's date was in
error.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
... to Charles J. Robinson
on number 65.
JUST ABOUT ALL the
350 people who attended
Crescent Shrine Club's - re-
cent Crippled Children and
Divan Night at Shenandoah
Country Club are now look-
ing forward to the group's
next affair . . . Crescent's
birthday party in Sep-
tember.
President Harry Kramer
couldn't have been more
pleased with the entire eve-
ning . . . as accolades came
from so many who enjoyed a
good time.
Entertainment chairman
of Crescent is Robert Harris
. . . Crippled Children
chairman is Oscar Kahan,
and Jimmy Laker is chair-
man for Burns Children .. .
Each had a child with their
families . . . as the guests of
Crescent.
DAVE BERMAN cele-_
brated his 65th birthday at
a dinner party . . . prepared
by wife Minnie . . . and if
anybody he knew from yes-
teryears had walked in,
Dave would have probably



said, "I want you to meet an
old friend of mine from
Theodore St."
Even when Dave and
Minnie went to Israel some
years ago, at the airport in
Tel Aviv, he bumped into a
friend from . . . you guessed
it . . . Theodore St.
If you lived on Theodore
St. during yesteryears, sure
would be a great kick for
Dave to receive a note say-
ing happy birthday.
Write to: Dave Berman,
23150 Marlow, Oak Park,
48237.
NANCY NATOW, who
graduated cum laude from
University of Michigan
School of Art less than a
year ago, is a young artist
folks are talking about.
Nancy had a fine painting
hung at the Scarab Club on
her first attempt in a juried
showing and now has an-
other juried painting being
displayed at the Detroit In-
stitute of Arts for a special
two-week show.
From Monday through
June 14, Nancy will also
have several of her paint-
ings on public display at
Rackham Memorial in Ann
Arbor . . . as one of only
three artists to have their
works exhibited at this
time.
She is the daughter of
Anita and Dan Natow.
MAX "MAGGIE"
KASOFF may be a sick
man, but he's very much
alive . . . contrary to some
thoughts .. The former
Hannah Schloss all-around
athlete . . . and member of
so many organizations,
lives at 20645 Knob Woods
Dr., Southfield.
JUDY TARNOW,
daughter of Sady and Mor-
tie Dermer, didn't let the
carpeting at Archibald's
hold her back when she
wanted to do something.
It was an intimate 14-
people birthday party for
Judy and one of the gifts
was a pair of shoe roller
skates which she im-
mediately put on and skated
around . . . to the gulping
amazement of Archibald
lunchers . . . (How would
you feel, ready to take a bite
and somebody came whiz-
zing by on roller skates?)

Belgians Alerted

BRUSSELS (JTA) — The
Belgian Army has been
entrusted with guarding
the country's nuclear reac-
tors following reports of
Palestinian terror groups
about to strike at vital in-
stallations.
Police believe the Pales-
tinians are prepared to
strike in reprisal against
the arrest of two Palesti-
nian terrorists in May car-
ried out an attack at Brus-
sels Airport wounding a
dozen passengers.

An estimated 24,000
Jews are expected to leave
Russia in 1979.

THE RYAN ROADBOUSE

Woody Allen's 'Manhattan
Found Lacking in Substance

By HERBERT LUFT

(Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

HOLLYWOOD

WOODY ALLEN'S "Man-
hattan" opens with a
cinematic view of New York
City, its imposing skyline,
candid shots of streets and
alleys, a fireworks in the
park — all this seen by Gor-
don Willis' camera lens in
images of black and white,
with dimmed greyish
shades between, to indicate
the flow of life from night to
day. The symphonic pattern
of the metropolis is accen-
tuated by the melodic
sounds of George Gershwin
tunes played by the New
York Philharmonic under
the baton of Zubin Mehta.
Once we disengage our-
selves from the turbulence
of the city, we are rather dis-
illusioned by a lack of sub-
stance in the story of "Man-
hattan." The neurotic,
pseudo-intellectual char-
acter portrayed by Allen is
no empire builder and his
pals of both sexes only
mildly amusing.
Though we appreciate the
finesse of Allen's film, with
the sweeping flow of its
photography reflecting the
pulse of the city, the narra-
tive is no match to the trap-
pings of brilliance.
There is a certain
charm in the relationship
of Allen with his friends;
he is torn between three
women; his former wife
who is about to expose
him in an autobiographi-
cal book; an overripe
teenager (portrayed with
the innocence of a puppy
by Mariel Hemingway);
and the perpetually smil-
ing and giggling Diane
Keaton who is on the
make for men in general.
Michael Murphy (whom
we met as the husband in
"An Unmarried Woman")
on the screen is no less
confused than is Woody
Allen; both of them are
constantly running in a
circle with Woody seem-
ingly extemporizing an
endless flood of chatter in
a yarn that shuns rigid
story construction.
We do not appreciate a
specifically "Jewish"
smart-alecky attitude in
our movies; yet, Allen gets a
lot of mileage from the
traits of his character, who
sleeps with a 17-year-old,
even if against his better
judgment. There should be a
fairer way to expose a de-
caying civilization.
Allen is a dedicated film
maker as he has proven
with "Interiors," a mature
work of the cinema. But Hs
witticism in toying with the
"folly" of his racial and reli-
gious background, perhaps
fitting for the nightclub
stage, is not appreciated by
us in the medium of mass
communication.
OLDRICH LIPSKY, the
Czech film director, was in
Hollywood _to show the
Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences his
latest picture, "Nick Carter
in Prague," a non-political
story dealing with the
exploits of a fictional pri-

vate eye who, not unlike
Sherlock Holmes, was made
famous just before the turn
of the century.

PETER SELLERS, por-
traying a double role in the
comical re-make of the mo-
tion picture classic, "The
Prisoner of Zenda," last
year shot on locations in
Vienna by Walter Mirisch,
now is in a more serious
film, "Being There," from a
"cult" novel by Jerzy
Kosinski about a powerful
financier who promotes a
political innocent to be a
candidate for the highest
office in the U.S.

MICKLIN
JOAN
SILVER, daughter-in-law
of Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver,
who made herself a name as
an independent film maker
with "Hester Street," is cur-
rently guiding "Chilly
Scenes of Winter," a modern
love story based on the
novel by Ann Beattie which
she also adapted for the sc-
reen.
MELVIN FRANK
celebrates 40 years in show
business with his 34th film,
the romantic comedy "Lost
and Found."

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