100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 01, 1979 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

16 Friday, lune 1, 1919

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Peace Treaty Registered at UN

"Best Deal In Town"

WILSON-CRISSMAN CADILLAC

CALL BUS. MI 4-1930
RES. 642-6836
1350 N. WOODWARD, BIRMINGHAM

UNITED
NATIONS
(JTA) — Israeli Ambas-
sador Yehuda Blum has
submitted copies of Israel's
peace treaty with Egypt and
related documents to
United Nations Acting
Legal Counsel John Scott
for formal registration.
The documents Blum

handed over were in all the
languages in which they
had been signed. Under the
United Nations Charter,
every treaty and interna-
tional agreement entered
into by any member state
must be registered with and
published by the UN
Secretariate.

FINAL NOTICE

CLOSED WEDNESDAY, MAY 30

Entire Inventory Now. Marked Down For Final Sale.
Every Item Will Be Sold For Cash. We Must Liquidate
This Inventory At All Cost.

GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS

.1

K‘t (0

Men's clothing from famous manu-
facturers and international designers .
like Givenchy, Oleg Cassini, Geoffrey.
Beene, Adolfo, Stanley Blacker, Nicola Mancini, B. Teller, Jaymar, Hathaway,
Lakeland, Sansabelt, Harbormaster, Lanvin, and many others.

formerly
Jonathan's

DRESS SHIRTS
SWEATERS
JACKETS
JACKETS
OUTERWEAR
JEANS
SOCKS, UNDERWEAR, ETC.
WALLETS, GLOVES, ETC.
100's OF SUITS
100's OF SPORT COATS
100's OF SHOES

DOORS OPEN 9am Thurs. & Fri. till 10pm

Thurs. & Fri. 9am-10pm • Sat 9am-6pm • Sunday Noon-5pm'• Mon 9:30am-9pm



FOR SALE: Fixtures, Mannequins, Display Items.
. Complete tailor shop, hemmer, straight sew and supplies.
Complete-pressing equipment-3 years old.

NOTICE: TAILOR SHOP CLOSED • NO ALTERATIONS • NO RETURNS • NO REFUNDS

master charge

■aott1.1,1k•

19771 12 Mile Rd. at Evergreen
in Evergreen Plaza, Southfield
Phone: 557-4560

GOB Permit No. 242

Boris Smolar's

`Between You
• . and Me'

Editor-in-Chief
Emeritus, JTA
. • (Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

.

THE "PAROLE VISAS": Can Iranian Jews — or
Jews who fled any country because of persecution, or fear of
persecution — secure American "parole visas" outside of
the U.S. immigration quota, as do Jews now leaving the
Soviet Union?
This question is now coming to the forefront in connec-
tion with the present situation of the Jews in Iran who live
in mortal fear. It is also emerging in connection with the
feeling of uneasiness now growing among Jews in Argen-
tina, the largest Jewish community in Latin America.
"Parole admission" gives the Attorney General un-
limited power.to
refugees irrespective of the
:i admit
annual.
world-wide immigration quotas of 290,000. The Attorney
General also has the authority to issue up to 17,400 "condi-
tional entry" visas to any alien who fled a Communist or
Communist-dominated country — or any country in the
Middle East — because of persecution or fear of persecu-
tion, on account of race, religion or political yiews.
The difference between "parole visas" and "conditional
entry" lies essentially in their relative degree of flexibility.
While the Attorney General may admit on parole an un-
limited number of aliens without taking into account their
national immigration quota, he is limited in "conditional
entry" by certain restraints of the definition of the ,term
"refugee" and by the fiscal year quota of 17,400. The "condi-
tional entry" is for a maximum period of two 'years, after
which the entrant must apply for permanent resident
status.
One must not be under the impression that only those
who now leave the Soviet Union are receiving "parole
visas." More than 600,000 such visas have been issued to
Cuban refugees since 1965. Approximately 140,000 South-
east Asians were admitted to the U.S. on "parole visas" in
1975. During the 1956 crisis in Hungary, when thousands
fled the country invaded by Moscow's Red Army, some
32,000 were granted admission to the U.S. under "parole
visas."
BILLS IN CONGRESS: At present, there are three
proposals before Congress recommending a redefinition of
the term "refugee" and changes in other provision& in the
immigration law. They are all more liberal than the pre-
sent law. Most responsive to Jewish concerns is the bill by
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.), introduced last March.
The other two proposals are: a policy statement of Associate
Attorney General Michael Egan, -and-a bill introduced by
former Rep. Joshua Eilberg (D-Pa.) in 1977. Legislative
action is anticipated this summer:
The Kennedy bill expands definition of displaced per-
sons to include also those uprooted by civil disturbances or
military operations. If a Jew were uprooted by such events
in Iran, he could be admitted to the U.S. as a displaced
person, although there were no persecutions on account of
his religion. An Argentine Jew could also be admitted as a
refugee or displaced person, since the Kennedy bill deletes
geographical limitations to the present definitions of who
can be clatsified as a refugee.
The Kennedy proposal also urges U\alimited "condi-
tional entry." It stipulates, however, that consultations
must be held with appropriate House and Senate Commit-
tees. Admissions of any large group of Jewish refugees on
conditional entry visas would, under the Kennedy bill, be
no more difficult than under the present system of `:parole
visas."
ASYLUM FOR NON-IMMIGRANTS: Never having
admitted refugees during the Nazi years, and remembering
the shameful and tragic act of not allowing the of
930 German-Jewish refugees who sought escape from Nazi
Germany in 1939 on board the ship St. Louis-- the U.S.
first turned to the use of special legislative authorization
after World War II, when thousands of Jewish survivors of
Nazism were clamoring to leave their DP camps.
The first legislative enactment was the Displaced Per- •
sons Act of 1948, which permitted the entry of 400,000
refugees. It was followed by the Refugee Relief Act of 1953
which brought to this country 214,000 refugees within
three years. The parole procedure system was decided upon
in 1952 as a flexible tool for dealing with large refugee
problems.
A new situation is developing now with regard to
foreign citizens who were admitted to the United States as
students, tourists and other non-immigrants. Thousands of
them now seek political asylum here fearing persecutions
in their native countries on account of race, religion or
political opinion. If granted asylum, such non-immigrants
can remain temporarily with their status to be reviewed
yearly. They are permitted to work.

Abner Mikva Is Named D.C. Judge

— by President Carter to the
WASHINGTON
Former Rep. Abner Mikva Federal District Court for
(D-Ill.) has been nominated the District of Columbia.



Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan