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April 27, 1979 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

12 Friday, April 21,419

14

Clothier

647-8054

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Russian Immigrants Are Trying to Repay
the Assistance of the Detroit Community

Celia and Arno Sosenky
arrived in Detroit from the
Soviet Union in January
1979 with their daughter
and son-in-law. They joined
a son who arrived here a
year earlier,
Resettlement Service, a
member agency of the
Jewish Welfare Federation,
found them an apartment in
Oak Park and helped them
get settled.
Soon after they arrived,
they visited the headquar-
t'ers of the Allied Jewish
Campaign Women's Di-
vision's Phonogift, a tele-
phone solicitation effort
which reaches 8,000 area
women.

Happy 85th Birthday

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ISADORE SHAPIRO

From

Your Loving Children,
Grandchildren and Great Grandchildren

was so impressed
with what I learned
about how money is col-
lected and distributed to
different agencies," Mrs.
Sosenky said.
Mrs. Sosenky visited
Phonogift again this year,
and acted as interpreter for
Women's Division workers
and the immigrants.
"I decided I should do
something to help," she
said. "I was unable to con-
tribute very much so I de-
cided to contribute my help.
I made a list of 35 Russian
immigrants and asked them
to give to the Campaign."
Every one of the immig-
rants contacted by Mrs.
Sosenky made a pledge to
the Campaign.
"They were happy to be
asked," she said. "They
want to feel a part of the
Jewish community and
to help other Jews.
Her husband has also
been donating his time to
the Jewish community. He
works as a volunteer
English teacher for recent
immigrants at the Jewish
Community Center.
"There are so many
people leaving Russia now
that it is impossible to hold
English classes for all of
them in Rome, where they
stay for several months be-
fore coming to the U.S.," he
said.
"Only the young people
can learn English in Rome,
so there are people coming
here who know not a word of
English. It is very hard for
the teachers who don't know
Russian to teach them at
the beginning, and that's
where I help," he said.
The Sosenky's fluent
English helped them ad-
just to their new home
more easily than many
Soviet immigrants.
"We were lucky because

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CELIA and ARNO SOSENKY

we know English," Mrs.
Sosenky said. "But we are
unlucky because we can't
find jobs."
The Sosenkys worked as
teachers in Kishinev. Mrs.
Sosenky taught Russian to
high school students for
more than 30 years. Since
Kishinev was part of
Romania before World War
II, Mrs. Sosenky learned
Romanian and has worked
as a translator from English
and Romanian to Russian.
Arno ,Sosenky, a native of
Germany, was a professor of
German language at the
Conservatory (Institute of
Arts) in Kishinev for 15
years. He has also taught
English, translated scien-
tific works from German
and English into Russian,
and written several schol-
arly articles on the German
language.
Despite their desire to
work and their inability
to find suitable jobs, the
Sosenkys are happy to be
in the U.S.
Sosenky still has vivid
memories of the 10 years he
spent in Soviet prison
camps. He was arrested in
1936 while he was working
for a German-language
newspaper. "The editor —
who was a Communist —

was accused of anti-Soviet
attitudes, and I was accused
of knowing about his atti-
tudes and of hiding them,"
he said. He was in prison
three years.
He was arrested again in
1948 and accused of "cos-
mopolitanism." "This was a
time when everything Rus-
sian had to be better than
everything not Russian," he
said. "If you said you liked
Beethoven better than
Tchaikowsky, you were
anti-Soviet." Sentenced to
10 years, he served seven.
"In Russia, people have to
have two faces," he said, -
"one for speaking to col-
leagues and students, when
you can't say what you
think, and the other for
speaking with your family.
"Here in the United
States you can say what
you think. In Russia you
can only think."
The Sosenkys have vis-
ited area synagogues and
youth groups and meetings
of adult Jewish organiza-
tions to talk about their ex-
periences in the Soviet
Union and here in the U.S.
"We are always ready to
help people and be helpful
because we have gotten so
much help from the Jewish
people," Mrs. Sosenky said.

Stulberg and Stern Add
to Music Study's Glories

Pianist Neal Stulberg
and violinist Mitchell Stern
gave evidence Sunday of
remarkable contributions
to music by a leading De-
troit women's organization.
Appearing in the annual
artist concert of Music
Study Club, at the resusci-
tated Orchestra Hall, they
lent their names to a large
number of promising musi-
cians who received
encouragement from the
women's group in reaching
the heights predicted for
them.
Stulberg and Stern now
will be part of the growing
family of musicians who
were provided large audi-
ences before whom they
proved their skills, many of
them having risen to great
heights.
Itzhak Pearlman, for
example, had the Music
Study Club of Detroit
among the first organiza-
tions to give him a boost. He
has not forgotten it and he
mentions it when he meets
Detroiters.
Many others achieved
fame after appearances at

Music Study Club concerts.
Stulberg, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Samuel Stulberg of
Detroit, is among the native
born Detroiters who are
achieving glory in music.
At Sunday's concert, be-
fore an appreciative audi-
ence, Stulberg was superb
in Schubert's "Sonata in A
Major, Opus 20" and Pro-
koviev's "Sonata No. 7,
Opus 83." Out of his Pro-
koviev emerged a com-
plete orchestral triumph.
Stern matched him in
brilliance in his interpreta-
tions of Elgar's "Sonata in E
Minor, Opus 82"; Schubert's
"Rondo Brilliant in B
Minor, D895" and Paganini
— Kreisler's "LaCam-
panella."
The concert achieved
added significance with the
appearance of a third musi-
cian of expressive ability,
Robert McDonald, who was
accompanist for Stern in the
Elgar piece.
—P.S.
Some 72 percent of U.S.
Jewish voters voted for
Democrats in the November
1978 elections.

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