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April 20, 1979 - Image 56

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

56

Friday, April 20, 1919

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

A FEATURE SUPPLEMENT

.041. 0,

Sponsored by

ULT RE C

i

TARBUTH FOUNDATION

FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF HEBREW CULTURE

129 West 67th St., New York, N.Y. 10023 - (212) 874-7837

ISRAEL'S MEDIA

Israelis love to read. Book consump-
tion in Israel on a per capita basis ranks
among the highest in the world. But the
reading habits of Israelis are not con-
fined to books. Today there are no less
than 23 daily newspapers in the Jewish
S tate which, in relation to the total pop-
ulation of approximately 33/4 million, is
enormous.
of those dailies, all but two are morn-
ing papers. Ma'ariv and Ye'diot Aharo-
not, the two popular evening papers,
have a circulation as large as all the dail-
ies combined.
Whereas Israel's radio and TV are
operated and owned by the State through
a special authority, the newspapers are
not. A measure of independent news re-
porting is thus assured from the outset.
Censorship exists only to the extent that
military matters or items involving state
security are concerned, and there does
exist a well functioning Board of Review
for complaints involving censorship.

Newspapers and Magazines

It has been a tradition of long standing
for Israel's political parties to publish
their own newspapers, not only journals
and periodicals, but dailies. This is still
the case, and it does account _for the
large number of daily newspapers.

Ha'aretz, the most respected daily,
has an independent political attitude and
does not refrain from criticizing the gov-
ernment whenever it sees fit. The famous
Schocken family owns Ha'aretz. On
the other hand, Davar, founded by Is-
rael's beloved Labor leader Bed Katz-
nelson in 1924, has always been the or-
gan of Histadrut, Israel's Labor Federa-
tion, and of Mapai, the Labor Party. As
long as there was a Labor government,
Davar came closest to what could be
called a government organ.
There are dailies of the left-wing par-
ties, such as Al Hamishmar, and of
the religious parties in their various shad-
ings. One daily newspaper, called Omer,
is written in simple Hebrew for those
who are trying to learn the language, and
there are three Arab newspapers which
enjoy Israel's freedom of the press just
as the Hebrew papers. Despite miiltary
censorship, these Arab papers still can
vent their objection to the very existence
of the Jewish State every single. day!
An interesting feature: the news-
papers written in languages other than
Hebrew, their list being headed by the
respected and widely read Jerusalem
Post, formerly Palestine Post. which
is published in English and is distributed
not only in Israel, but also in the USA
and Western countries. In addition there

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TARBUTH FOUNDATION

• President: Dr. Abraham Goodman; Executive Vice President: Dr. Emil Lehman; Editor: Dr. Max Rothschild

r--- FRIDAY TELEVISION AND RADIO SCHEDULE

(Reprinted from "Ha'aretz")

are the German, French, Spanish, Ru-
manian, Yiddish, Persian daily news-
papers and many others, whose reader-
ship consists of the immigrants from
these respective countries.

07.07
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10.05
10.35
10.40
11.10
11.40

Network Radio

Israel's radio had its origins in the
Palestine Broadcasting Service of the
Mandate era, beginning in 1936. Soon
the Haganah set up an underground ra-
dio station, Kol Yisrael, which became
Israel's official radio network with the
foundation of the State. Today there are
four radio networks (Reshatot, singular
Reshet): Reshet Aleph transmits in
Hebrew and offers news, serious music,
and educational programs; Beth fea-
tures light music, entertainment, com-
mercials and, most important, it trans-
mits regular programs in languages other
than Hebrew for new immigrants, as
well as a simplified Hebrew program for
the immigrant learners; Reshet Gimel
beams its programs by short wave to other
countries in the form of Kol Yisrael
La'Golah, the languages ranging from
Russian to Persian, French, English;
Yiddish and others. Finally, the Israeli
Defense Forces have their own radio sta-
tion. called "Gallei Zahal," (The Armed
Forces Network).

It is no exaggeration to state that Is-
rael's radio, especially "Gallei Zahal,"

has become a significant part of Israeli
adult education, and thus of Israel's cul-
tural life, quite aside from its role as part
of the news media.

Television

Television started in Israel rather late,
and at first in the form of an 'educational
enterprise directed at schools and new
immigrants: General TV was not estab-
lished until after the Six-Day War. All of
a sudden, it appeared that there were
many TV sets in the country with people
viewing also the programs beamed from
Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Egypt.
Israel's TV of today is still only black
and white, featuring approximately six
hours every day, beginning at 5:00 P.M.;
wholesome educational programs are
broadcast in the morning. There always
is a children's hour, as well as a pro-
gram in Arabic. News broadcasts are
transmitted in several languages. Inter-
estingly enough, the TV listings in Is-
rael's daily newspapers feature the pro-
grams emanating from Jordan as well
as the Israeli programs!
One of the welcome features of Is-
rael's TV is the absence of advertising.
On the other hand, owners of TV sets
have to pay a government tax. A special

4

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No. 28

Published by TARBUTH FOUNDATION, INC.

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government TV authority is in charge
of all TV operations.
Little known is the fact that a good
part of Israel's prime TV time each
evening is devoted to Arabic programs,
and it must be saib that these programs
are definitely more positive and con-
structive than the hateful anti-Israel
tirades beamed from Syria and Jordan.
A typical Israeli TV schedule will fea-
ture a lecture on the Torah portion of
the week or a chapter from other parts of
the Bible, daily news, weekly news sum-
maries and analyses, an American play
with Rock Hudson, Aram Katchaturian's
Violin Concerto, Hawaii 5-0 and so
forth.
In the 31 years of its existence, the
Jewish State has created under severe
financial strains a high standard of pub-
lic media which can proudly hold its own
in today's world.

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NOT ONLY IN AMERICA

"Experiencing Technical Difficulties"

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WHAT ABOUT THE SECOND HALF?

RECENT AD OF THE ISRAEL
BROADCASTING AUTHORITY

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