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March 30, 1979 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

16

Flay, March 30,1919

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Passover Popovers

NEW YORK — The fol-
lowing recipe for Passover
Popovers is one of many re-
cipes in The Jewish Party
Book: A Contemporary
Guide to Customs, Crafts,
and Foods," by Mae Shafter
Rockland (Schocken Books).

cup water
1 /4 cup salad oil
3 tblsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1 cup matza meal (regular or
cake meal)
3 eggs
Combine the water, salad
oil, sugar, and salt in a large
saucepan and bring to a boil.
Remove from heat and stir in
the matza meal. Beat the eggs,
one at a time, and add each to
the matza-meal mixture, mix-
ing well after each addition.
Wet your hands and form the

3 /4

very sticky dough into six
large. halls_ Plana an a lightly-
greased baking sheet, leaving
two inches betWeen each ball.
Bake in a pre-heated 400° oven
on the center rack. If desired,
they can be made smaller or
use honey instead of sugar.

In her book, Ms. Rockland
tells the story of Passover,
how it has been celebrated
through the ages, how
prepare the Seder table, and
and
how to choose a Haggada.
She includes both tradi-
tional and contemporary
suggestions for holding a
festive and meaningful
Seder.

Poverty arid shame shall
be to him that refuseth in-
struction.

11.11WOWINIIPINW
111111111111 1111111111.14111111_

''..4

Sociologist Sees Changing Federation Role

By BEN GALLOB

-

(Copyright 1979, JTA, Inc.)

NEW YORK — The 62-
year-old New York Federa-

Auschwitz Visit
Is Set for Pope-

WARSAW — The Polish
government announced last
week that Pope John Paul II
will visit the Auschwitz
concentration camp during
his official visit to Poland in
June.
The Pope and United Na-
tions Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim will also
dedicate a children's hospi-
tal in memory of the 14 mil-
lion children killed during
World War II.

Plans Completed for Military,
Hospital Passover Observances

NEW YORK — For
American Jewish military
families throughout the
world and patients in Vete-
rans Administration hospi-
tals, Passover this year will
be a special time, thanks to
advance arrangements and
shipments made by JWB,
local affiliates, Jewish
chaplains and military lay
-leaders.
Sedorim will be con-
ducted by full-time--and

cl?aginowitz-

cSorEmnizEd

MRS. RABINOWITZ

Madalyn Brin and Martin
Alan Rabinowitz were mar-
ried in a recent ceremony at
the Sheraton Southfield
Hotel.
The bride is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Brin of
Southfield. Parents of the
bridegroom are Mr. and
Mrs. Seymour Rabinowitz,
also of Southfield.
Bridesmaids were Sandy
Brin, Susie Rabinowitz,
Yehudis Rabinowitz, Judy
Zimmerman and Betty
Gasner. Ushers were Mar-
tin Brin, Steve Rabinowitz,
Bruce Rabinowitz and Ar-
thur Rabinowitz.
The
new
Mrs.
Rabinowitz was
graduated from the Uni-
versity of Detroit and
Miami-Dade School of
Respiratory Therapy.
Her husband was
graduated from Oakland
University and Wayne
State University's School
of Pharmacy.
Following a honeymoon
in Las Vegas and Israel the
couple is residing in South-
field.

part-time Jewish chaplains
and Jewish military lay
leaders. Kosher supplies
and religious materials —
everything from Haggadot
and prayer books to matzot
and wine — will be provided
through JWB's Commission
on Jewish Chaplaincy and
Women's Organizations'
Services to more than 500
military installations in the
Philippines, Taiwan,
Okinawa, Japan, Korea,
Italy, Spain, Germany, Ice-
land, Greenland, Alaska,
Panama, the U.S., the
Caribbean area, and
elsewhere, as well as ships
at sea, weather and radar
stations, U.S. embassies the
world over, VA hospitals
and other Federal facilities
for hospitalized veterans.
JWB will also provide for
the religious needs of Peace
Corps volunteers in Fiji, Af-
rica and other overseas lo-
cations.
The JWB Women's
Organizations' Services
distributed special "Solo
Seder" packages to
Jewish servicemen
stationed at isolated
areas throughout the
world, and to men on
duty at remote weather
and radar stations. The
Solo Seder packages con-
tain all the ingredients
for a Seder meal for one
person.
"Family Nosherei Pack-
ages" are also issued by the
Women's Organizations'
Services. These contain
Passover macaroons,
cookies, candy, nuts, cake
mixes and Haggadot for a
family of four.
Jewish patients in VA
hospitals will also partici-
pate in Passover obser-
vances conducted by chap-
lains. In some hospitals, the
cassette recording of the
Passover melodies will be
brought to the patients'
bedsides over the hospital's
public address system.
At many installations in
the U.S. and overseas, spe-
cial kosher Passover meals
will be provided for the
entire eight days of the
holiday.

Some of the larger kibut-
zim use computers to oper-
ate their irrigation systems.

JWB is the U.S. govern-
ment-accredited agency for
serving Jewish military
personnel, their families
and sick and disabled
patients in Veterans Ad-
ministration hospitals. It is
also the Association of
Jewish Community Cen-
ters, YM-YWHA' and
camps in the U.S. and
Canada.

* * *

W. Point Seder

WEST POINT, N.Y. —
More than 500 persons are
expected' to attend a com-
munity Seder at the U.S.
Military Academy on April
15. -
Participants will include
West Point personnel and
officers of the West Point
Jewish Chapel Fund, which
is seeking to build the first
Jewish chapel in the 174-
year history of West Point.

cCtEinl ezrEguitE

5 otfi liinicrEZsaty

tion of Jewish Philan- parable survey of such lead- ments of Jewish survival,
thropies . has- , in recent ers shovved in 1968.
are not r canny part, of federa-
years, shifted its emphasis
He listed a number of tion's structure."
from financing health and other factors changing fed-
He asserted that the most
welfare agencies for the eration- directions. One is important factor against a
Jewish needy to that of a changes in government feeling of Jewish commu-
central agency responsible funding, with a higher nity in New York City is
to • the entire Jewish com- proportion of hospitals and that New York Jews "do not
munity.
welfare agencies now think of themselves as an
This is the judgment of funded with public money.
organized community.
Charles S. Liebman, profes- Another is demography -- Their loyalties are either
sor of Jewish sociology at the movement of Jews in parochial — to a particular
the Jewish Theological large numbers to new areas organization, school or
Seminary, in an extensive of residence.
synagogue — and/or gen-
survey of the federation's
Another is the growth of eral — to Israel, Judaism or
history in the 1979 Ameri- the black power movement the Jewish people.
can Jewish Year Book, pub- and manifestations of black
"If federation is to create
lished by the American anti-Semitism, which he and lead a Jewish commu-
Jewish Committee and the said helped to motivate nity, it will not do so by
Jewish Publication Society federation policy in the di- \ shifting Jewish loyalties to
of America.
rection of Jewish emphasis itself,. but rather by serving
He reported that the fed- in its programs.
as an instrument for shap-
eration allocates funds to
Another was the Six-Day ing loyalties. In the last
130 agencies and institu- War, which contributed to analysis, federation is an
tions in the Greater New the Jewish pride and con- instrument and not an end,
York area which serve the cern of federation leaders, in the creation of a Jewish
health, welfare, rec- and still another was a community."
reational and educational growing concern of federa-
needs of some 1.5 million tion leaders with concepts of
people. This year, the feder- the common good. "While
ation will distribute more federation has not aban-
than $27 million to these doned its concern for the
agencies. Two-thirds of the general welfare, it now
money comes from the an- views its contribution to
nual joint Federation- that welfare through the
EU INN NM En =I OM MP
Greater New York United medium of group interest,"
COUPON GOOD FOR
Jewish Appeal campaign.
he reported.
One result of this chang-
But within the last de-
cade, Prof Liebman re- ing emphasis, Prof. Lieb-
ON ANY
ported, the children of East man declared, is that the
European Jews have proportion of federation
entered federation leader- funds going to hospitals es-
ship ranks. He said a recent tablished under Jewish au-
WATCH BAND
survey of federation lead- spices has dropped while al-
FITTED, SIZED
ers indicated in many ways locations for Jewish educa-
AND NEW PINS
INCLUDED
a much stronger sense of tion have increased. ' In
good thru 4-13-79
Jewish identity than a com- addition, he said, federation
MN MN MN ME MN MN MN NM
has started to use its influ-
COUPON GOOD FOR
Robert Shosteck ence to increase the Jewish
GENUINE
of the- programs of
of Bnai Brith, 69 content
EVER ADv
its beneficiary agencies.
WASHINGTON (JTA) —
BATTERY
The federation also has
Robert Shosteck died March started to finance agencies
ALL SIZES FOR LCD, LED
ACCUTON, QUARTZ, PULSAR
15 at age 69. At the time of with a specifically Jewish
AND ELECTRONIC WATCHES
his death he was beginning group communal purpose,
25 INCLUDES
a career as a television per- such as the Greater New
EACH. AND SETTING
sonality after working as a York Conference on Soviet
good thru 4-13-79
forest ranger, naturalist, Jewry, and the Jewish
-------
historian, professor, voca- Community Relations
OVER 35 V AS OF DEPENDABLE SERVICE
tional guidance expert, Council.
museum director and
However, the sociologist
author.
JEWELRY
added, "synagogues, major
Mr. Shosteck, a native of foci of Jewish identification
250 W. 9 ARE RD., FERNDALE 48220
4 STORES EAST OF F&M
LI6-5551
Trenton, N.J., who resided and commitment, remain e
PARKING
in Bethesda, Md., spent marginal to federation. I -
.'14
IN REAR ,_4 1;2
most of his adult life with Jewish schools, perhaps the ',MN..
it.- ■ mt ... ■ - mmmm — mm mil
Bnai Brith International in most important instru-
Washington. He joined the
Jewish service organization
in 1941 as director of re-
search of its vocational serv-
ice bureau' and 26 years
LANDSCAPE CO.
later became curator of the
Bnai Brith Klutznick Ex-
AMERICA'S FOREMOST LANDSCAPER
hibit Halls (now museum).
He retired in. 1975.
Before joining Bnai
Long ago Zade planted
Brith, he had been a for-
a maple tree
est ranger in the state of

TIME

SAVERS

$2°° OFF

E

$2

-

SISLER

SABRA

THE STEINS

Mr. and Mrs. Harry (Re-
becca) Stein of Oak Park
were honored by their chil-
dren and grandchildren
Sunday at a party at the 10
Mile Jewish Community
Center on the occasion of
their 50th wedding an-
niversary.
Their children are Mr.
and Mrs. Leo (Barbara)
Stein and Dr. and Mrs:Sid
(Lynn) Leib, hosts of the
party. The senior Steins
have seven grandchildren.
Born in Poland, Stein is a
retired scrap metal dealer.
With his wife, who was born
in Russia, Stein is active in
the Yiddish Culture Club
and Friendship Club at the
10 Mile Center.
The couple holds mem-
bership at Cong. Bnai
Moshe.

Washington and during
World War D. was a re-
search specialist at the
national roster of spe-
cialized and scientific
personnel office of the
War Manpower commis-
sion.
From Bnai Brith, he went
to the National Park Serv-
ice and the Maryland Na-
tional Parks and Planning
Commission as a consultant
and guide on nature trails
and historical sites in the
metropolitan area. He was
also a lecturer at area col-
leges. He was a founder and
past president of the Wash-
ington Jewish Historical
Society.

Son, he said, this is for
you and me

I'm a man of ninety years
so when I go shed no tears

I'll always remember what
We planted that night

It's a bond between us
forever that will always
be right.

SABRA LANDSCAPE CO.

47833 West Seven Mile Road
Northville, Michigan 48167

(313) 477-4400



Presich:o;

BERNARD MARGOLIS



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