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January 19, 1979 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1979-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

14 Friday, hoary 19, 1919

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Commandos Demolish a Terrorist Base
Following Attack on Maalot Guest 'House

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TEL AVIV (JTA) — An
Israeli commando force de-
molished a terrorist base on
the Lebanese coast south of
Tyre Monday night and re-
turned safely to its base. A
military spokesman said
the target of the seaborne
raid was at Ras-El Ein
which Israeli intelligence
determined was the start-
ing point of the three ter-
rorists who attacked a guest
house at Maalot Saturday
and were slain by Israeli
soldiers.
In a related development,
an Arab shepherd and his
father were arrested in
their Galilee village on sus-
picion of having directed the
terrorists to Maalot. Ac-
cording to police, the
shepherd encountered the
three who identified them-
selves as terrorists outside
the village. He took them
into his home where his
father prepared food for
them and later showed
them how to reach Maalot,
the police said. The suspects
admitted collaboration with
the terrorists but said they
did so at gunpoint.
Israeli soldiers killed the
three heavily armed ter-
rorists who raided the guest
house and convalescent cen-
ter just before dawn in an
attempt to seize hostages for
the release of terrorists im-
prisoned in Israel. Miriam
Alfasi, 31, of Beersheba was
killed trying to escape
through a window.
Two other women were
injured in the same man-
ner and a soldier, Cpl. It-
zhak Ravivo, 20, was
wounded in the ankle in a
shoot-out with the ter-
rorists. All were taken to
Haifa Hospital for treat-
ment.
The terrorists were the
first to infiltrate Israel from
south Lebanon since Israeli
forces withdrew from that

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territory last spring and
turned the task of policing it
over to the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL).
Documents found on the
bodies of the slain terrorists
indicated that they *be-
longed to Naif Hawatmeh's
Popular Democratic Front
for the Liberation of Pales-
tine. This was confirmed in
a terrorist radio broadcast
from Beirut.
The U.S, State Depart-
ment condemned the at-
tack.
The fact that Maalot
was the target had a pro-
found psychological ef-
fect in Israel. In May,
1974, that village four
miles south of the
Lebanese border was the
scene of one of the worst
terrorist massacres in Is-
rael's ‘ histOry. At that
rmed terrorists
armed
from Lebanon seized a
school where children on
a hiking tour of Galilee
were spending the night
and slaughtered 28 of
them during a battle with
Israeli forces.
The guest house at
Maalot served as both a re-
sort and convalescent home,
operated by Kupat Holim,
the Histadrut sick-fund. It
was occupied by about 230
people, most of them el-
derly, and also by a group of
Egged bus drivers with
their families who were
spending the weekend
there.
The terrorists managed to
enter the three-story build-
ing undetected and took
several hostages at gun-
point before they were con-
fronted by Israeli soldiers.
The wounded corporal,
Ravivo, said he was in
charge of a platoOn that was
staying overnight at the
guest house. At about 6:30
a.m. he and two other
soldiers inspected the build-
ing as a matter of routine.
"On the third floor I
noticed a dark-faced man
with a large handbag,"
Ravivo said. "We asked him
who he was. He mumbled
something in Arabic, and
then grabbed a Kalatch-
nikof rifle he had concealed
in a dark corner. I grabbed
the rifle • from him. Two
other terrorists rushed up
from the second floor and
opened fire on us. We re-
turned the fire.
"The first terrorist who
was closest to us threw a
hand grenade. I -grabbed
it and threw it back. It
exploded, killing the at-
tacker. The other two
raced downstairs and out
of the building. They
were gunned down by
other soldiers about 150
yards from the. door."
Ravivo, the son of a police
officer, was promoted to the
rank of sergeant while hos-
pitalized.
In unrelated incidents,
police sappers safely dis-
mantled explosive devices
planted by terrorists at
soldier pick-up stations
near Jerusalem and
Ashdod. A booby-trapped

hand grenade was dis-
covered just outside
Jerusalem on the Tel Aviv
highway. An improvised
pipe bomb in a plastic - bag
was found at a roadstop out-
side Ashdod.

On Wednesday, police
sappers dismantled a pow-
erful bomb found in a
parked Mercedes car near
the Habirah movie house in
one of the busiest sections of
Jerusalem. Yesterday, a
bomb exploded in a
Jerusalem market, injuring
at least 20 persons.
'Meanwhile, a military

court in Rarnallah im-
posed long prison terms
on two Arabs whose at-
tempt to bomb a school in
Ramat Gan a year ago
failed when the watch
they used as a timing de-
vice stopped before it
could trigger the explo-
sive charge.
Hassan Abdul Majib, 41,
was sentenced to 18 years in
prison and Saleh Bangui I,
37, drew an eight-year
term. They were arrested
when they took the defec-
tive watch to a Jewish
watchmaker in Jerusalem.
for repairs.

U.S. Sends Armed Jets
to Saudis in Security' Show

, WASHINGTON (JTA) —
The United States an-
nounced that it is sending
12 armed F-15- fighter jets
and 300 or more American
airmen to Saudi-Arabia in a
demonstration of "security"
for the kingdom of Saudi
Arabia and the Middle East
"region" that may be
threatened by the continu-
ing turmoil in Iran.
However, the Pentagon
said that the F-15s will
leave the U.S. Saturday for
Saudi Arabia because time
is needed to complete logis-
tical arrangements, includ-
ing permission for over-
flights en route.
According to the Penta-
gon, 250-300 airmen will
accompany the planes, in-
cluding about 36 pilots. The
others will be support per-
sonnel as the U.S. has no
support base in Saudi
Arabia.
The Pentagon dis-

closed that the "purpose
of the deployment will be
for the demonstration of
the F-15 aircraft." The
State Department
clarified this later by em-
phasizing that it "is not a
training mission" but "a
'highly visible fly-in" in
which the American jets
will "do some highly visi-
ble flights."
The State Department's
chief spokesman Hodding
Carter emphasized that the
planes were being sent "at
the invitation" of Saudi
Arabia.
Last spring, Saudi Arabia
was authorized to purchase
60 F-15s. Carter said-Saudi
Arabia "is currently
scheduled" to begin train-
ing its-pilots in .the U.S. in
1981 and that delivery "of
the planes, the most highly
sophiSticated fighters in the
U.S. arsenal, would be in
1982. • -

12,000-Year-Old Dog Found

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
What is believed to be the
skeleton of one of the
world's oldest domesticated
dogs has been identified by
an Israel scientist.
Found in a human grave
excavated two years ago by
a French team of ar-
chaeologists, -the dog's re-
mains were identified by
Simon Davis, a daeteazal
student in Hebrew Univer-
sity's zoology department.
The discovery is likely to
shed new light on the mores
of ancient Canaanite corn-
- munities.
Found in a tomb in the
Galilee, the dog is thought
to have been a three-to-
five-month-old puppy. It
supports the hypothesis
that man had already
domesticated dogs 12 mil-
lennia ago.
Davis, 29, came to Is-
rael from Britain as an
undergraduate and has
remained here working
in research at the He-
brew University. His
supervising professor,
Tchernov, said the
domestication of dogs as
exampled in this find
seems to have preceded
that of other animals by
some 3,000 years.
Tchernov's theory is that
dogs were used to help with

hunting, and that primitive
man found it unnecessary to
domesticate today's far-
niyard animals for food pur-
poses. Some 9,000 years
ago, according to the evi-
dence, sheep and goat herd-
ing began, and this was fol- -
lowed by cow herding and
lastly, horse and donkey
domestication.

_Tchernov believes the
Jordan Valley basin was the
area of man's earliest ex- '
perimentation in the field of
animal domestication.

Finances Slow
Jordan Valley
Development

JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Financial difficulties are -
the main reason for th
slowdown in the develop-
ment of Jewish settlements
in the Jordan Valley, Shi-
mon Ravid, director of the
World Zionist Organization
Settlement Department,
told members of the Labor
Party Bureau while touring
the area recently.
Gen. Moshe. Levy, com-
mander of the central
region command, told the
group the settlements could
serve as a contributing de-.
fense force should there be a
military confrontation.

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