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October 13, 1978 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

40 Friday, October 13, 1918

Tarbuth Foundation, Arts School Moving Into Goodman House

By BEN GALLOB

in the Lincoln Center area
of mid-Manhattan.
The $3.5-million, eight-
story Goodman House is a
tribute to the vision and
dedication of Abraham
Goodman. The idea for a
culture foundation was first
proposed in 1961 to the
Goodman brothers, Ab-
raham and Jack, by Dr.
Emanuel Neumann, the
veteran Zionist leader, now
the Tar,buth Foundation's
honorary president. The
foundation's first office was
in the Jewish Agency build-
ing in Manhattan. Ab-
raham Goodman, a leading
Jewish philanthropist and
treasurer of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, is
president of the Tarbuth
Foundation.
In 1975, the Foundation
received office space in the
H. Goodman and Sons Co. in
Manhattan and there,
under the executive vice
presidency of Dr. Emil
Lehman, continued and ex-
panded a multitude of
Jewish cultural programs.
- -

(Copyright 1978, JTA, Inc.)

A center for Jewish cul-
tural programming be-
lieved to be unmatched in
the United States in the
scope and variety of its ac-
tivities is scheduled to begin
functioning this month
when the Tarbuth Founda-
tion for the Advancement of
Jewish Culture and the He-
brew Arts School for Music
and Dance take up perma-
nent residence in the new
Abraham Goodman House

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Lehman, who had been di-
rector of the Herzl Institute
for 20 years, was invited by
Goodman to become founda-
tion executive - vice
president after he had
served the foundation as a
consultant for-a decade.
The Hebrew Arts
School, operating out of
rented quarters in the
Lincoln Center area, was
started in 1962 as the first
music and dance conser-
vatory of its kind. It cele-
brated its 15th birthday
last fall. Starting with 16
students in two small,
borrowed classrooms,
the Hebrew Arts School
reported at the start of
the 1977-78 school year
more than 500 students
and a part-time faculty of
50 teachers.
Lehman said the founda-
tion and the arts school will
share the facilities of the
Goodman House. These in-
clude a 500-seat concert hall
and a major recital
chamber, as well as many
music and dance studios
and a major library for
Jewish music.
Also included is an ex:
hibit section to display
works of Jewish art; a
variety of recreational
facilities; a garden; and an
out-reach center using
radio, television, audio-
visual arts and other forms
of communication to spread
the ideas and values of the
Jewish cultural experience.
There will also be 12 piano
studios and 10 instrumental
studios.
Both the foundation and
the school are now moving
into Goodman House and
expect to be functioning
fully by the _end of this
month. The Abraham
Goodman building will be
formally dedicated Nay. 19.
The facilities of Good-
man House will make
possible not only con-
tinuation of the many and
varied programs of the
foundation and the arts
school- but also a consid-
erable expansion of the
programs of both institu-
tions.
This is particularly true
of the Tarbuth Foundation,
which has conducted its
far-ranging programs from
its offices in the Goodman
company, compared to the
school which, though func-
tioning in rented quarters,
has had enough facilities for
a children's division, art
education programs, a
teacher training institute
and a performing arts di-
vision.

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The Hebrew Arts School, program, made possible by
founded by Dr. Ziporah H. the availability of the
Jochsberger, its director, is facilities 1 of Goodman
a non-profit, non-sectarian House, will be held one af-
conservatory chartered by ternoon a week, starting the
the Board of Regents of the first week in February.
The foundation has a
State University of New
York. Goodman is also major program of TV offer-
president and chairman of ings, which Lehman said
would be continued and ex-
the board of the school.
Operating out of its pre- panded in the foundation's
sent office, the foundation new home. All of the 30-
provides an exceptional minute programs are tele-
range of Jewish cultural cast on cable TV outlets in
programs, several in coop- Manhattan.
The foundation has
eration with other Jewish
published five volumes in
organizations:
On the status of the a Modern Hebrew
Jewish family, sponsored Classics Series, original
in cooperation with local . Hebrew language edi-
federations, is a program tions, on selected stories
which Lehman hopes to of S.Y. Agnon, essays of
stage at Goodman House, Ahad Ha'am, stories of
while continuing with Asher Barash, stories of
plans for the established Hayim Hazzaz, and the
Tamarisk and other
out-of-town gatherings.
A new series, "Weekends stories of Yitzhak
With Jewish History," has Shenhan. The Modern
been initiated by the found- Hebrew Classics are used
ation and has been pre- in many colleges with
sented in various com- Hebrew departments,
munities in New York State Lehman said.
Another popular founda-
and is available in other
tion publication, "Israel
areas, Lehman said.
In connection with a With A Smile," a book of
major bicentennial exhibit, Hebrew language conversa-
held at the New York City tions for intermediates by
Center during the summer Dr. Shlomo Kodesh, has
of 1976, in which 30 organ- _ been published in an edition
izations joined with the of 12,000 copies, with most
foundation to celebrate of them distributed.
The foundation has also
"Cultural Pluralism —
America's Gift to Jewish published a series of He-
History," the foundation brew language courses on
published a Cultural tape, for beginners, inter-
Chronology of American mediates and advanced stu-
dents, produced in coopera-
Jewry.
As an outgrowth of that -tion with the department of
project, the foundation education and culture of the
plans an inservice course for American Section of the
public school teachers on World Zionist Organiza-
cultural pluralism, stres- tion. Also available are a
sing its Jewish elements. series of program aids for
Lehman said the 15-week _ camps and schools, on He-

,

Sarah DeRoven Dies at 92

Sarah DeRoven an active
volunteer and member of
Jewish communal and
women's organizations,
died Oct. 5 at age 92.
Born in Poland, Mrs. De-
Roven came to the U.S. in
1927 with her husband, Ab-
raham Sulkes, and their
children. Mr. Sulkes died in
1932. In 1938 she married
Abraham DeRoven.

M. P. Greenblatt

Murray P. Greenblatt, an
attorney and certified pub-
lic accountant, died Oct. 6 at
age 49.
A native Detroiter, Mr.
Greenblatt was graduated
from the University of
Michigan and the Harvard
University School of Law.
He was president of the
Great Lakes Acceptance
Corp., a subsidiary of the
Bally Corp. He was a
member of Cong. Shaarey
Zedek, Hannah Schloss Old
Timers and the City of
Hope. He was an active
numismatist.
-Mr. Greenblatt was
active in efforts on behalf of
the Allied Jewish Cam-
paign and the United Foun-
dation. He also was a
member of MENSA.
Mr. Greenblatt - leaves
two sons, Greg and Dean; a
daughter, Gwen; and his
mother, Mrs. Daniel (Dol-
lie) Greenblatt.

SARAH DeROVEN

Mrs. DeRoven was a
charter member of Club
One, Pioneer Women; the
former Cong. Beth
Moses; was a lifetime
volunteer leader in the
Jewish National Fund
and held important offi-
cial posts in the Women of
JNF; was a member of
Hadassah; United He-
brew Schools Woman's
Auxiliary; Jewish Home
for Aged Auxiliary and
Kvutza Ivrit Hebrew Cul-
tural Group.
Mrs. DeRoven was the re-
cipient of many communal
honors.
She is survived by a son,
Emanuel M. Sulkes; a
daughter, Mrs. Harold
(Rae) Goodman; seven
grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren.

brew through games, songs,
stamps, arts and crafts and
in camp, as well as a pro-
gram manual for camp
counselors.
A Hebrew Culture Cara-
van is a periodical feature
supplement, available as a
public service to newspaper
and congregational and
organization bulletins. A
filmstrip, "An Interview
with Judah Halevi," comes 4
with a written script and'an
audio cassette. A 25-minute 4
filmstrip, now in prepara-
tion, will deal with Yi
in America.
1 S- *-4

11111

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP
MANAGEMENT AND
CIRCULATION

(Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685)

1. TITLE OF PUBLICATION: The
Jewish News Publishing Company.
2. DATE OF FILING: Sept 29, 1978
3. FREQUENCY OF ISSUE: Weekly.
A. NO OF ISSUES PUBLISHED
ANNUAL: 52.
B. ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION
PRICE: $12.00.
4. LOCATION OF KNOWN OFFICE
OF PUBLICATION: 17515 W. 9
Mile Rd., Suite 865, Southfield,
Oakland County, Michigan 48075.
5. LOCATION OF THE HEAD-
QUARTERS OR GENERAL
BUSINESS OFFICES OF THE
PUBLISHERS. Same as above.
6. NAME AND ADDRESS OF PUB-
LISHER, EDITOR AND MANAG-
ING EDITOR: Philip SkUnovitz,
22300 Lucerne Dr., Apt. 101,
Southfield, Mich. 48075.
7. OWNER The Jewish News Publ.
Co., 17515 W. 9 Mile, Suite 865,
Southfield, Michigan 48075.
Philip Slomovitz, 22300 Lucerne,
Apt. 101, Southfield, Michigan
48075.
Carnal M. Slomovitz, 16400 N. Park
Dr., Apt. 706, Southfield, Michigan
48075.
8. KNOWN BONDHOLDERS,
MORTGAGES, AND OTHER SE-
CURITY HOLDERS OWNING OR
HOLDING 1 PERCENT OR MORE
OF TOTAL AMOUNT OF BONDS,
MORTGAGES OR OTHER
SECURITIES: None.
(In the fillowing tabulation first
column of figures is "Average No.
Copies Each Issue During Preced-
ing 12-Months," second column is
"Actual Number of copies of Single
Issue Published Nearest to Filing
Date.")
10. EXTENT AND NATURE OF CIR-
CULATION:
A. TOTAL NO. COPIES PRINTED
5o
Run):
(1
N
4e5tPress
16,175
B. PAID CIRCULATION:
1.
SALES THROUGH
DEALERS AND CARRIERS,
STREET VENDORS AND
COUNTER SALES:
1,750
2. MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: 2
12,650
13,298
C. TOTAL PAID CIRCULATION:
14,400
15,573
D. FREE DISTRIBUTION BY
MAIL, CARRIERS OR OTHER
MEANS, SAMPLES, COM-
PLIMENTARY, AND OTHER
FREE COPIES:
400
50
E. TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (Sum
of C and D):
14,450
15,973
F. COPIES NOT DISTRIBUTED

1. OFFICE USE, LEFT OVER,
UNACCOUNTED, SPOILED
AFTER PRINTING:
50
-- 100
2. RETURNS FROM NEWS
'AGENTS:
102
50
G. TOTAL: Sum of E&F 1 and 2 —
should equal net press run shown in
A):
16,175
14,550

I certify that the statements
me above are correct and c
CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ,'•
Bus MgrJCorp. Sec'y.

FOR OPTIONAL COMPLETION
BY PUBLISHERS MAILING AT
THE REGULAR RATES (Section
132,121, Postal Service Manual) 39
U.S.C. 3626 provides in pertinent
part: "No person who would have
been entitled to mail matter under
former section 4359 of this title
shall mail such matter at the rates
provided under this subsection un-
less he files annually with the
a written request for
tes,
permission to mail matter at such
rates."
In accordance with the provisions of
this statute, I hereby request per-
mission to mail the publication
named in Item 1 at the reduced
postage rated presently authorized
by 39 U.S.C. 3626.
CARMI M. SLOMOVITZ,
Bub. MgrJCorp. Sec'y

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